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'Tis the Season (Slideshow)

'Tis the Season (Slideshow)

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October 25, 2013

By

Elyse Cromer

Eat seasonally this fall

Roasted Butternut Squash and Apple Soup

Cranberry Sesame Salad

Try making this salad this fall. With hints of cranberry and sesame, it gives off the perfect amount of sweetness.

Click here to see the Cranberry Sesame Salad Recipe

Spicy Roasted Brussels Sprouts

Roasting is a fantastic way to prepare Brussels sprouts. Add kimchi, a staple in the Korean diet, for a little tang and spice.

Click here to see the Spicy Roasted Brussels Sprouts Recipe

Maple Acorn Squash

This is the perfect side dish for roast turkey at Thanksgiving, or even a simple roast chicken on a weeknight.

Click here to see the Maple Acorn Squash Recipe

Mashed Pumpkin with Pumpkin Seeds

Try this recipe for a different take on the traditional mashed potato. It's great to serve as a side dish for Thanksgiving, or as a new fall favorite.

Click here to see the Mashed Pumpkin with Pumpkin Seeds Recipe

Mike's Hard Apple Slaw

This slaw is great to serve as a side dish for any party. The apples are the perfect flavor for the fall occasion.

Click here to see the Mike's Hard Apple Slaw Recipe

Roasted Butternut Squash Soup and Cumin Dusted Pita Chips

With fall in the air and school in session, apples and pumpkins begin to fill the produce aisles. Here’s an idea for a delicious and easy-to-make soup that perfectly pairs apples with butternut squash. Add another layer of flavor when served with cumin pita chips.

Click here for the Roasted Butternut Squash Soup Recipe


‘Tis the Season for Family Recipes

Season’s Greetings! During December we invite you to submit your holiday recipes and memories to our ‘Family Recipe Book’ by commenting on our Facebook post and using the hashtags #EpiscopalEats and #FamilyRecipe. We can’t wait to see what yummy recipes you share.

To kick us off, in this blog Esther Cohen, our Chief Operating Officer, shares some of her favorites. Enjoy!

It’s time to haul out the holly and the flour, sugar and the red and green sprinkles. And, in my house, if it’s time to bake Christmas cookies, it’s time to haul out one of my dearest possessions—my very first cookbook.

I still have it, Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book, found under the Christmas tree in (ahem) 1968 and signed “Love to Esther from Mom.”

I’ve spent a lot of time with this book and it definitely shows its age. The binding is ripped, the pages frayed and stained. I learned how to make much more than cookies from this book. In fact, I still regularly use its recipes for meatloaf, pancakes and waffles. When I can’t remember how long to roast a turkey or how many tablespoons are in a cup, Betty Crocker is my reliable source.

The cookbook also holds old family recipes written on blank pages and stuffed into the book on index cards. My grandmother’s biscuits, my neighbor’s cookies, my sister-in-law’s meringues… my mother’s handwriting as she doubled some recipes for her hungry family. There is so much more than food in this book.

And then, there are the Christmas cookies, the ones we’ll make again this year, just as I have since (ahem) 1968. The best sugar cookie recipe in the world (hint: it uses confectioners sugar). And the Russian Teacakes, which my husband calls Mexican Teacakes (I suspect they are neither Russian nor Mexican, and I’ve never seen anyone drink tea with them, but they are pretty tasty). I’ll pull out the recipe cards with my mother-in-law’s bourbon balls, which we’ll make, and her fruitcake, which we won’t.

We’ll bake cookies for home and cookies for the cookie swap at church, cookies for the office and despite having no small children anymore—cookies for Santa.

And Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book will have a few more stains and a few more frays. And a few more memories.

Recipes From Esther’s Cookbook

Mary’s Sugar Cookies

1 1/2 cups sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 egg, 1 tsp. vanilla, 1/2 tsp. almond flavoring, 2 1/2 cups flour, 1 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. cream of tartar

Cream sugar and butter. Mix in egg and flavorings. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend dry ingredients stir in. Refrigerate 2 to 3 hrs. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Divide dough in half and roll our on lightly floured pastry cloth to 3/16 inches thick. Cut as shown above. Sprinkle with sugar. Place on lightly greased baking sheet. Bake 7 to 8 minutes, or until delicately golden. Makes five dozen 2 to 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Russian Teacakes

1 cup soft butter, 1/2 cup sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 1/4 cups flour, 1/4 tsp. salt, 3/4 cup finely chopped nuts

Mix butter, sugar and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level pour method or by sifting. Blend flour and salt, stir in. Mix in nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Roll into 1 inch balls. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. While still warm, roll in confectioners’ sugar. Cool. Roll in sugar again. Makes about four dozen 1 inch cookies.

Date-Oatmeal Cookies

3/4 cup soft shortening (half butter), 1 cup brown sugar (packed), 2 eggs, 3 tsp milk, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 cups flour, 3/4 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. salt, 2 cups cut-up dates, 3/4 cup chopped nuts

Mix shortening, brown sugar, eggs, milk and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend flour, soda and salt stir in. Mix in rolled oats, dates and nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Roll into balls size of large walnuts. Place 3 inches apart on lightly greases baking sheet. Flatten to 1/4 inches thick with bottom of glass dipped in flour. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. Makes about four dozen 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Esther Cohen is the Chief Operating Officer at Episcopal Relief & Development

Images: Esther’s cookbook accompanied by some of her favorite recipes Middle 1 — Esther’s first cookbook is signed “Love to Esther from Mom. Christmas, 1968” Middle 2 — Esther’s grandmother’s handwritten biscuit recipe and her neighbor Jane’s peanut butter blossom recipe Middle 3 — Esther as a child with her mother and two cats Mittens and Tiger.


‘Tis the Season for Family Recipes

Season’s Greetings! During December we invite you to submit your holiday recipes and memories to our ‘Family Recipe Book’ by commenting on our Facebook post and using the hashtags #EpiscopalEats and #FamilyRecipe. We can’t wait to see what yummy recipes you share.

To kick us off, in this blog Esther Cohen, our Chief Operating Officer, shares some of her favorites. Enjoy!

It’s time to haul out the holly and the flour, sugar and the red and green sprinkles. And, in my house, if it’s time to bake Christmas cookies, it’s time to haul out one of my dearest possessions—my very first cookbook.

I still have it, Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book, found under the Christmas tree in (ahem) 1968 and signed “Love to Esther from Mom.”

I’ve spent a lot of time with this book and it definitely shows its age. The binding is ripped, the pages frayed and stained. I learned how to make much more than cookies from this book. In fact, I still regularly use its recipes for meatloaf, pancakes and waffles. When I can’t remember how long to roast a turkey or how many tablespoons are in a cup, Betty Crocker is my reliable source.

The cookbook also holds old family recipes written on blank pages and stuffed into the book on index cards. My grandmother’s biscuits, my neighbor’s cookies, my sister-in-law’s meringues… my mother’s handwriting as she doubled some recipes for her hungry family. There is so much more than food in this book.

And then, there are the Christmas cookies, the ones we’ll make again this year, just as I have since (ahem) 1968. The best sugar cookie recipe in the world (hint: it uses confectioners sugar). And the Russian Teacakes, which my husband calls Mexican Teacakes (I suspect they are neither Russian nor Mexican, and I’ve never seen anyone drink tea with them, but they are pretty tasty). I’ll pull out the recipe cards with my mother-in-law’s bourbon balls, which we’ll make, and her fruitcake, which we won’t.

We’ll bake cookies for home and cookies for the cookie swap at church, cookies for the office and despite having no small children anymore—cookies for Santa.

And Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book will have a few more stains and a few more frays. And a few more memories.

Recipes From Esther’s Cookbook

Mary’s Sugar Cookies

1 1/2 cups sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 egg, 1 tsp. vanilla, 1/2 tsp. almond flavoring, 2 1/2 cups flour, 1 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. cream of tartar

Cream sugar and butter. Mix in egg and flavorings. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend dry ingredients stir in. Refrigerate 2 to 3 hrs. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Divide dough in half and roll our on lightly floured pastry cloth to 3/16 inches thick. Cut as shown above. Sprinkle with sugar. Place on lightly greased baking sheet. Bake 7 to 8 minutes, or until delicately golden. Makes five dozen 2 to 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Russian Teacakes

1 cup soft butter, 1/2 cup sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 1/4 cups flour, 1/4 tsp. salt, 3/4 cup finely chopped nuts

Mix butter, sugar and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level pour method or by sifting. Blend flour and salt, stir in. Mix in nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Roll into 1 inch balls. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. While still warm, roll in confectioners’ sugar. Cool. Roll in sugar again. Makes about four dozen 1 inch cookies.

Date-Oatmeal Cookies

3/4 cup soft shortening (half butter), 1 cup brown sugar (packed), 2 eggs, 3 tsp milk, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 cups flour, 3/4 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. salt, 2 cups cut-up dates, 3/4 cup chopped nuts

Mix shortening, brown sugar, eggs, milk and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend flour, soda and salt stir in. Mix in rolled oats, dates and nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Roll into balls size of large walnuts. Place 3 inches apart on lightly greases baking sheet. Flatten to 1/4 inches thick with bottom of glass dipped in flour. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. Makes about four dozen 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Esther Cohen is the Chief Operating Officer at Episcopal Relief & Development

Images: Esther’s cookbook accompanied by some of her favorite recipes Middle 1 — Esther’s first cookbook is signed “Love to Esther from Mom. Christmas, 1968” Middle 2 — Esther’s grandmother’s handwritten biscuit recipe and her neighbor Jane’s peanut butter blossom recipe Middle 3 — Esther as a child with her mother and two cats Mittens and Tiger.


‘Tis the Season for Family Recipes

Season’s Greetings! During December we invite you to submit your holiday recipes and memories to our ‘Family Recipe Book’ by commenting on our Facebook post and using the hashtags #EpiscopalEats and #FamilyRecipe. We can’t wait to see what yummy recipes you share.

To kick us off, in this blog Esther Cohen, our Chief Operating Officer, shares some of her favorites. Enjoy!

It’s time to haul out the holly and the flour, sugar and the red and green sprinkles. And, in my house, if it’s time to bake Christmas cookies, it’s time to haul out one of my dearest possessions—my very first cookbook.

I still have it, Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book, found under the Christmas tree in (ahem) 1968 and signed “Love to Esther from Mom.”

I’ve spent a lot of time with this book and it definitely shows its age. The binding is ripped, the pages frayed and stained. I learned how to make much more than cookies from this book. In fact, I still regularly use its recipes for meatloaf, pancakes and waffles. When I can’t remember how long to roast a turkey or how many tablespoons are in a cup, Betty Crocker is my reliable source.

The cookbook also holds old family recipes written on blank pages and stuffed into the book on index cards. My grandmother’s biscuits, my neighbor’s cookies, my sister-in-law’s meringues… my mother’s handwriting as she doubled some recipes for her hungry family. There is so much more than food in this book.

And then, there are the Christmas cookies, the ones we’ll make again this year, just as I have since (ahem) 1968. The best sugar cookie recipe in the world (hint: it uses confectioners sugar). And the Russian Teacakes, which my husband calls Mexican Teacakes (I suspect they are neither Russian nor Mexican, and I’ve never seen anyone drink tea with them, but they are pretty tasty). I’ll pull out the recipe cards with my mother-in-law’s bourbon balls, which we’ll make, and her fruitcake, which we won’t.

We’ll bake cookies for home and cookies for the cookie swap at church, cookies for the office and despite having no small children anymore—cookies for Santa.

And Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book will have a few more stains and a few more frays. And a few more memories.

Recipes From Esther’s Cookbook

Mary’s Sugar Cookies

1 1/2 cups sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 egg, 1 tsp. vanilla, 1/2 tsp. almond flavoring, 2 1/2 cups flour, 1 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. cream of tartar

Cream sugar and butter. Mix in egg and flavorings. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend dry ingredients stir in. Refrigerate 2 to 3 hrs. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Divide dough in half and roll our on lightly floured pastry cloth to 3/16 inches thick. Cut as shown above. Sprinkle with sugar. Place on lightly greased baking sheet. Bake 7 to 8 minutes, or until delicately golden. Makes five dozen 2 to 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Russian Teacakes

1 cup soft butter, 1/2 cup sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 1/4 cups flour, 1/4 tsp. salt, 3/4 cup finely chopped nuts

Mix butter, sugar and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level pour method or by sifting. Blend flour and salt, stir in. Mix in nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Roll into 1 inch balls. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. While still warm, roll in confectioners’ sugar. Cool. Roll in sugar again. Makes about four dozen 1 inch cookies.

Date-Oatmeal Cookies

3/4 cup soft shortening (half butter), 1 cup brown sugar (packed), 2 eggs, 3 tsp milk, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 cups flour, 3/4 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. salt, 2 cups cut-up dates, 3/4 cup chopped nuts

Mix shortening, brown sugar, eggs, milk and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend flour, soda and salt stir in. Mix in rolled oats, dates and nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Roll into balls size of large walnuts. Place 3 inches apart on lightly greases baking sheet. Flatten to 1/4 inches thick with bottom of glass dipped in flour. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. Makes about four dozen 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Esther Cohen is the Chief Operating Officer at Episcopal Relief & Development

Images: Esther’s cookbook accompanied by some of her favorite recipes Middle 1 — Esther’s first cookbook is signed “Love to Esther from Mom. Christmas, 1968” Middle 2 — Esther’s grandmother’s handwritten biscuit recipe and her neighbor Jane’s peanut butter blossom recipe Middle 3 — Esther as a child with her mother and two cats Mittens and Tiger.


‘Tis the Season for Family Recipes

Season’s Greetings! During December we invite you to submit your holiday recipes and memories to our ‘Family Recipe Book’ by commenting on our Facebook post and using the hashtags #EpiscopalEats and #FamilyRecipe. We can’t wait to see what yummy recipes you share.

To kick us off, in this blog Esther Cohen, our Chief Operating Officer, shares some of her favorites. Enjoy!

It’s time to haul out the holly and the flour, sugar and the red and green sprinkles. And, in my house, if it’s time to bake Christmas cookies, it’s time to haul out one of my dearest possessions—my very first cookbook.

I still have it, Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book, found under the Christmas tree in (ahem) 1968 and signed “Love to Esther from Mom.”

I’ve spent a lot of time with this book and it definitely shows its age. The binding is ripped, the pages frayed and stained. I learned how to make much more than cookies from this book. In fact, I still regularly use its recipes for meatloaf, pancakes and waffles. When I can’t remember how long to roast a turkey or how many tablespoons are in a cup, Betty Crocker is my reliable source.

The cookbook also holds old family recipes written on blank pages and stuffed into the book on index cards. My grandmother’s biscuits, my neighbor’s cookies, my sister-in-law’s meringues… my mother’s handwriting as she doubled some recipes for her hungry family. There is so much more than food in this book.

And then, there are the Christmas cookies, the ones we’ll make again this year, just as I have since (ahem) 1968. The best sugar cookie recipe in the world (hint: it uses confectioners sugar). And the Russian Teacakes, which my husband calls Mexican Teacakes (I suspect they are neither Russian nor Mexican, and I’ve never seen anyone drink tea with them, but they are pretty tasty). I’ll pull out the recipe cards with my mother-in-law’s bourbon balls, which we’ll make, and her fruitcake, which we won’t.

We’ll bake cookies for home and cookies for the cookie swap at church, cookies for the office and despite having no small children anymore—cookies for Santa.

And Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book will have a few more stains and a few more frays. And a few more memories.

Recipes From Esther’s Cookbook

Mary’s Sugar Cookies

1 1/2 cups sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 egg, 1 tsp. vanilla, 1/2 tsp. almond flavoring, 2 1/2 cups flour, 1 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. cream of tartar

Cream sugar and butter. Mix in egg and flavorings. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend dry ingredients stir in. Refrigerate 2 to 3 hrs. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Divide dough in half and roll our on lightly floured pastry cloth to 3/16 inches thick. Cut as shown above. Sprinkle with sugar. Place on lightly greased baking sheet. Bake 7 to 8 minutes, or until delicately golden. Makes five dozen 2 to 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Russian Teacakes

1 cup soft butter, 1/2 cup sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 1/4 cups flour, 1/4 tsp. salt, 3/4 cup finely chopped nuts

Mix butter, sugar and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level pour method or by sifting. Blend flour and salt, stir in. Mix in nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Roll into 1 inch balls. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. While still warm, roll in confectioners’ sugar. Cool. Roll in sugar again. Makes about four dozen 1 inch cookies.

Date-Oatmeal Cookies

3/4 cup soft shortening (half butter), 1 cup brown sugar (packed), 2 eggs, 3 tsp milk, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 cups flour, 3/4 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. salt, 2 cups cut-up dates, 3/4 cup chopped nuts

Mix shortening, brown sugar, eggs, milk and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend flour, soda and salt stir in. Mix in rolled oats, dates and nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Roll into balls size of large walnuts. Place 3 inches apart on lightly greases baking sheet. Flatten to 1/4 inches thick with bottom of glass dipped in flour. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. Makes about four dozen 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Esther Cohen is the Chief Operating Officer at Episcopal Relief & Development

Images: Esther’s cookbook accompanied by some of her favorite recipes Middle 1 — Esther’s first cookbook is signed “Love to Esther from Mom. Christmas, 1968” Middle 2 — Esther’s grandmother’s handwritten biscuit recipe and her neighbor Jane’s peanut butter blossom recipe Middle 3 — Esther as a child with her mother and two cats Mittens and Tiger.


‘Tis the Season for Family Recipes

Season’s Greetings! During December we invite you to submit your holiday recipes and memories to our ‘Family Recipe Book’ by commenting on our Facebook post and using the hashtags #EpiscopalEats and #FamilyRecipe. We can’t wait to see what yummy recipes you share.

To kick us off, in this blog Esther Cohen, our Chief Operating Officer, shares some of her favorites. Enjoy!

It’s time to haul out the holly and the flour, sugar and the red and green sprinkles. And, in my house, if it’s time to bake Christmas cookies, it’s time to haul out one of my dearest possessions—my very first cookbook.

I still have it, Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book, found under the Christmas tree in (ahem) 1968 and signed “Love to Esther from Mom.”

I’ve spent a lot of time with this book and it definitely shows its age. The binding is ripped, the pages frayed and stained. I learned how to make much more than cookies from this book. In fact, I still regularly use its recipes for meatloaf, pancakes and waffles. When I can’t remember how long to roast a turkey or how many tablespoons are in a cup, Betty Crocker is my reliable source.

The cookbook also holds old family recipes written on blank pages and stuffed into the book on index cards. My grandmother’s biscuits, my neighbor’s cookies, my sister-in-law’s meringues… my mother’s handwriting as she doubled some recipes for her hungry family. There is so much more than food in this book.

And then, there are the Christmas cookies, the ones we’ll make again this year, just as I have since (ahem) 1968. The best sugar cookie recipe in the world (hint: it uses confectioners sugar). And the Russian Teacakes, which my husband calls Mexican Teacakes (I suspect they are neither Russian nor Mexican, and I’ve never seen anyone drink tea with them, but they are pretty tasty). I’ll pull out the recipe cards with my mother-in-law’s bourbon balls, which we’ll make, and her fruitcake, which we won’t.

We’ll bake cookies for home and cookies for the cookie swap at church, cookies for the office and despite having no small children anymore—cookies for Santa.

And Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book will have a few more stains and a few more frays. And a few more memories.

Recipes From Esther’s Cookbook

Mary’s Sugar Cookies

1 1/2 cups sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 egg, 1 tsp. vanilla, 1/2 tsp. almond flavoring, 2 1/2 cups flour, 1 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. cream of tartar

Cream sugar and butter. Mix in egg and flavorings. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend dry ingredients stir in. Refrigerate 2 to 3 hrs. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Divide dough in half and roll our on lightly floured pastry cloth to 3/16 inches thick. Cut as shown above. Sprinkle with sugar. Place on lightly greased baking sheet. Bake 7 to 8 minutes, or until delicately golden. Makes five dozen 2 to 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Russian Teacakes

1 cup soft butter, 1/2 cup sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 1/4 cups flour, 1/4 tsp. salt, 3/4 cup finely chopped nuts

Mix butter, sugar and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level pour method or by sifting. Blend flour and salt, stir in. Mix in nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Roll into 1 inch balls. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. While still warm, roll in confectioners’ sugar. Cool. Roll in sugar again. Makes about four dozen 1 inch cookies.

Date-Oatmeal Cookies

3/4 cup soft shortening (half butter), 1 cup brown sugar (packed), 2 eggs, 3 tsp milk, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 cups flour, 3/4 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. salt, 2 cups cut-up dates, 3/4 cup chopped nuts

Mix shortening, brown sugar, eggs, milk and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend flour, soda and salt stir in. Mix in rolled oats, dates and nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Roll into balls size of large walnuts. Place 3 inches apart on lightly greases baking sheet. Flatten to 1/4 inches thick with bottom of glass dipped in flour. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. Makes about four dozen 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Esther Cohen is the Chief Operating Officer at Episcopal Relief & Development

Images: Esther’s cookbook accompanied by some of her favorite recipes Middle 1 — Esther’s first cookbook is signed “Love to Esther from Mom. Christmas, 1968” Middle 2 — Esther’s grandmother’s handwritten biscuit recipe and her neighbor Jane’s peanut butter blossom recipe Middle 3 — Esther as a child with her mother and two cats Mittens and Tiger.


‘Tis the Season for Family Recipes

Season’s Greetings! During December we invite you to submit your holiday recipes and memories to our ‘Family Recipe Book’ by commenting on our Facebook post and using the hashtags #EpiscopalEats and #FamilyRecipe. We can’t wait to see what yummy recipes you share.

To kick us off, in this blog Esther Cohen, our Chief Operating Officer, shares some of her favorites. Enjoy!

It’s time to haul out the holly and the flour, sugar and the red and green sprinkles. And, in my house, if it’s time to bake Christmas cookies, it’s time to haul out one of my dearest possessions—my very first cookbook.

I still have it, Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book, found under the Christmas tree in (ahem) 1968 and signed “Love to Esther from Mom.”

I’ve spent a lot of time with this book and it definitely shows its age. The binding is ripped, the pages frayed and stained. I learned how to make much more than cookies from this book. In fact, I still regularly use its recipes for meatloaf, pancakes and waffles. When I can’t remember how long to roast a turkey or how many tablespoons are in a cup, Betty Crocker is my reliable source.

The cookbook also holds old family recipes written on blank pages and stuffed into the book on index cards. My grandmother’s biscuits, my neighbor’s cookies, my sister-in-law’s meringues… my mother’s handwriting as she doubled some recipes for her hungry family. There is so much more than food in this book.

And then, there are the Christmas cookies, the ones we’ll make again this year, just as I have since (ahem) 1968. The best sugar cookie recipe in the world (hint: it uses confectioners sugar). And the Russian Teacakes, which my husband calls Mexican Teacakes (I suspect they are neither Russian nor Mexican, and I’ve never seen anyone drink tea with them, but they are pretty tasty). I’ll pull out the recipe cards with my mother-in-law’s bourbon balls, which we’ll make, and her fruitcake, which we won’t.

We’ll bake cookies for home and cookies for the cookie swap at church, cookies for the office and despite having no small children anymore—cookies for Santa.

And Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book will have a few more stains and a few more frays. And a few more memories.

Recipes From Esther’s Cookbook

Mary’s Sugar Cookies

1 1/2 cups sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 egg, 1 tsp. vanilla, 1/2 tsp. almond flavoring, 2 1/2 cups flour, 1 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. cream of tartar

Cream sugar and butter. Mix in egg and flavorings. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend dry ingredients stir in. Refrigerate 2 to 3 hrs. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Divide dough in half and roll our on lightly floured pastry cloth to 3/16 inches thick. Cut as shown above. Sprinkle with sugar. Place on lightly greased baking sheet. Bake 7 to 8 minutes, or until delicately golden. Makes five dozen 2 to 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Russian Teacakes

1 cup soft butter, 1/2 cup sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 1/4 cups flour, 1/4 tsp. salt, 3/4 cup finely chopped nuts

Mix butter, sugar and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level pour method or by sifting. Blend flour and salt, stir in. Mix in nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Roll into 1 inch balls. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. While still warm, roll in confectioners’ sugar. Cool. Roll in sugar again. Makes about four dozen 1 inch cookies.

Date-Oatmeal Cookies

3/4 cup soft shortening (half butter), 1 cup brown sugar (packed), 2 eggs, 3 tsp milk, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 cups flour, 3/4 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. salt, 2 cups cut-up dates, 3/4 cup chopped nuts

Mix shortening, brown sugar, eggs, milk and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend flour, soda and salt stir in. Mix in rolled oats, dates and nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Roll into balls size of large walnuts. Place 3 inches apart on lightly greases baking sheet. Flatten to 1/4 inches thick with bottom of glass dipped in flour. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. Makes about four dozen 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Esther Cohen is the Chief Operating Officer at Episcopal Relief & Development

Images: Esther’s cookbook accompanied by some of her favorite recipes Middle 1 — Esther’s first cookbook is signed “Love to Esther from Mom. Christmas, 1968” Middle 2 — Esther’s grandmother’s handwritten biscuit recipe and her neighbor Jane’s peanut butter blossom recipe Middle 3 — Esther as a child with her mother and two cats Mittens and Tiger.


‘Tis the Season for Family Recipes

Season’s Greetings! During December we invite you to submit your holiday recipes and memories to our ‘Family Recipe Book’ by commenting on our Facebook post and using the hashtags #EpiscopalEats and #FamilyRecipe. We can’t wait to see what yummy recipes you share.

To kick us off, in this blog Esther Cohen, our Chief Operating Officer, shares some of her favorites. Enjoy!

It’s time to haul out the holly and the flour, sugar and the red and green sprinkles. And, in my house, if it’s time to bake Christmas cookies, it’s time to haul out one of my dearest possessions—my very first cookbook.

I still have it, Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book, found under the Christmas tree in (ahem) 1968 and signed “Love to Esther from Mom.”

I’ve spent a lot of time with this book and it definitely shows its age. The binding is ripped, the pages frayed and stained. I learned how to make much more than cookies from this book. In fact, I still regularly use its recipes for meatloaf, pancakes and waffles. When I can’t remember how long to roast a turkey or how many tablespoons are in a cup, Betty Crocker is my reliable source.

The cookbook also holds old family recipes written on blank pages and stuffed into the book on index cards. My grandmother’s biscuits, my neighbor’s cookies, my sister-in-law’s meringues… my mother’s handwriting as she doubled some recipes for her hungry family. There is so much more than food in this book.

And then, there are the Christmas cookies, the ones we’ll make again this year, just as I have since (ahem) 1968. The best sugar cookie recipe in the world (hint: it uses confectioners sugar). And the Russian Teacakes, which my husband calls Mexican Teacakes (I suspect they are neither Russian nor Mexican, and I’ve never seen anyone drink tea with them, but they are pretty tasty). I’ll pull out the recipe cards with my mother-in-law’s bourbon balls, which we’ll make, and her fruitcake, which we won’t.

We’ll bake cookies for home and cookies for the cookie swap at church, cookies for the office and despite having no small children anymore—cookies for Santa.

And Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book will have a few more stains and a few more frays. And a few more memories.

Recipes From Esther’s Cookbook

Mary’s Sugar Cookies

1 1/2 cups sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 egg, 1 tsp. vanilla, 1/2 tsp. almond flavoring, 2 1/2 cups flour, 1 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. cream of tartar

Cream sugar and butter. Mix in egg and flavorings. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend dry ingredients stir in. Refrigerate 2 to 3 hrs. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Divide dough in half and roll our on lightly floured pastry cloth to 3/16 inches thick. Cut as shown above. Sprinkle with sugar. Place on lightly greased baking sheet. Bake 7 to 8 minutes, or until delicately golden. Makes five dozen 2 to 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Russian Teacakes

1 cup soft butter, 1/2 cup sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 1/4 cups flour, 1/4 tsp. salt, 3/4 cup finely chopped nuts

Mix butter, sugar and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level pour method or by sifting. Blend flour and salt, stir in. Mix in nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Roll into 1 inch balls. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. While still warm, roll in confectioners’ sugar. Cool. Roll in sugar again. Makes about four dozen 1 inch cookies.

Date-Oatmeal Cookies

3/4 cup soft shortening (half butter), 1 cup brown sugar (packed), 2 eggs, 3 tsp milk, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 cups flour, 3/4 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. salt, 2 cups cut-up dates, 3/4 cup chopped nuts

Mix shortening, brown sugar, eggs, milk and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend flour, soda and salt stir in. Mix in rolled oats, dates and nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Roll into balls size of large walnuts. Place 3 inches apart on lightly greases baking sheet. Flatten to 1/4 inches thick with bottom of glass dipped in flour. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. Makes about four dozen 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Esther Cohen is the Chief Operating Officer at Episcopal Relief & Development

Images: Esther’s cookbook accompanied by some of her favorite recipes Middle 1 — Esther’s first cookbook is signed “Love to Esther from Mom. Christmas, 1968” Middle 2 — Esther’s grandmother’s handwritten biscuit recipe and her neighbor Jane’s peanut butter blossom recipe Middle 3 — Esther as a child with her mother and two cats Mittens and Tiger.


‘Tis the Season for Family Recipes

Season’s Greetings! During December we invite you to submit your holiday recipes and memories to our ‘Family Recipe Book’ by commenting on our Facebook post and using the hashtags #EpiscopalEats and #FamilyRecipe. We can’t wait to see what yummy recipes you share.

To kick us off, in this blog Esther Cohen, our Chief Operating Officer, shares some of her favorites. Enjoy!

It’s time to haul out the holly and the flour, sugar and the red and green sprinkles. And, in my house, if it’s time to bake Christmas cookies, it’s time to haul out one of my dearest possessions—my very first cookbook.

I still have it, Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book, found under the Christmas tree in (ahem) 1968 and signed “Love to Esther from Mom.”

I’ve spent a lot of time with this book and it definitely shows its age. The binding is ripped, the pages frayed and stained. I learned how to make much more than cookies from this book. In fact, I still regularly use its recipes for meatloaf, pancakes and waffles. When I can’t remember how long to roast a turkey or how many tablespoons are in a cup, Betty Crocker is my reliable source.

The cookbook also holds old family recipes written on blank pages and stuffed into the book on index cards. My grandmother’s biscuits, my neighbor’s cookies, my sister-in-law’s meringues… my mother’s handwriting as she doubled some recipes for her hungry family. There is so much more than food in this book.

And then, there are the Christmas cookies, the ones we’ll make again this year, just as I have since (ahem) 1968. The best sugar cookie recipe in the world (hint: it uses confectioners sugar). And the Russian Teacakes, which my husband calls Mexican Teacakes (I suspect they are neither Russian nor Mexican, and I’ve never seen anyone drink tea with them, but they are pretty tasty). I’ll pull out the recipe cards with my mother-in-law’s bourbon balls, which we’ll make, and her fruitcake, which we won’t.

We’ll bake cookies for home and cookies for the cookie swap at church, cookies for the office and despite having no small children anymore—cookies for Santa.

And Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book will have a few more stains and a few more frays. And a few more memories.

Recipes From Esther’s Cookbook

Mary’s Sugar Cookies

1 1/2 cups sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 egg, 1 tsp. vanilla, 1/2 tsp. almond flavoring, 2 1/2 cups flour, 1 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. cream of tartar

Cream sugar and butter. Mix in egg and flavorings. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend dry ingredients stir in. Refrigerate 2 to 3 hrs. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Divide dough in half and roll our on lightly floured pastry cloth to 3/16 inches thick. Cut as shown above. Sprinkle with sugar. Place on lightly greased baking sheet. Bake 7 to 8 minutes, or until delicately golden. Makes five dozen 2 to 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Russian Teacakes

1 cup soft butter, 1/2 cup sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 1/4 cups flour, 1/4 tsp. salt, 3/4 cup finely chopped nuts

Mix butter, sugar and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level pour method or by sifting. Blend flour and salt, stir in. Mix in nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Roll into 1 inch balls. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. While still warm, roll in confectioners’ sugar. Cool. Roll in sugar again. Makes about four dozen 1 inch cookies.

Date-Oatmeal Cookies

3/4 cup soft shortening (half butter), 1 cup brown sugar (packed), 2 eggs, 3 tsp milk, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 cups flour, 3/4 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. salt, 2 cups cut-up dates, 3/4 cup chopped nuts

Mix shortening, brown sugar, eggs, milk and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend flour, soda and salt stir in. Mix in rolled oats, dates and nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Roll into balls size of large walnuts. Place 3 inches apart on lightly greases baking sheet. Flatten to 1/4 inches thick with bottom of glass dipped in flour. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. Makes about four dozen 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Esther Cohen is the Chief Operating Officer at Episcopal Relief & Development

Images: Esther’s cookbook accompanied by some of her favorite recipes Middle 1 — Esther’s first cookbook is signed “Love to Esther from Mom. Christmas, 1968” Middle 2 — Esther’s grandmother’s handwritten biscuit recipe and her neighbor Jane’s peanut butter blossom recipe Middle 3 — Esther as a child with her mother and two cats Mittens and Tiger.


‘Tis the Season for Family Recipes

Season’s Greetings! During December we invite you to submit your holiday recipes and memories to our ‘Family Recipe Book’ by commenting on our Facebook post and using the hashtags #EpiscopalEats and #FamilyRecipe. We can’t wait to see what yummy recipes you share.

To kick us off, in this blog Esther Cohen, our Chief Operating Officer, shares some of her favorites. Enjoy!

It’s time to haul out the holly and the flour, sugar and the red and green sprinkles. And, in my house, if it’s time to bake Christmas cookies, it’s time to haul out one of my dearest possessions—my very first cookbook.

I still have it, Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book, found under the Christmas tree in (ahem) 1968 and signed “Love to Esther from Mom.”

I’ve spent a lot of time with this book and it definitely shows its age. The binding is ripped, the pages frayed and stained. I learned how to make much more than cookies from this book. In fact, I still regularly use its recipes for meatloaf, pancakes and waffles. When I can’t remember how long to roast a turkey or how many tablespoons are in a cup, Betty Crocker is my reliable source.

The cookbook also holds old family recipes written on blank pages and stuffed into the book on index cards. My grandmother’s biscuits, my neighbor’s cookies, my sister-in-law’s meringues… my mother’s handwriting as she doubled some recipes for her hungry family. There is so much more than food in this book.

And then, there are the Christmas cookies, the ones we’ll make again this year, just as I have since (ahem) 1968. The best sugar cookie recipe in the world (hint: it uses confectioners sugar). And the Russian Teacakes, which my husband calls Mexican Teacakes (I suspect they are neither Russian nor Mexican, and I’ve never seen anyone drink tea with them, but they are pretty tasty). I’ll pull out the recipe cards with my mother-in-law’s bourbon balls, which we’ll make, and her fruitcake, which we won’t.

We’ll bake cookies for home and cookies for the cookie swap at church, cookies for the office and despite having no small children anymore—cookies for Santa.

And Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book will have a few more stains and a few more frays. And a few more memories.

Recipes From Esther’s Cookbook

Mary’s Sugar Cookies

1 1/2 cups sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 egg, 1 tsp. vanilla, 1/2 tsp. almond flavoring, 2 1/2 cups flour, 1 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. cream of tartar

Cream sugar and butter. Mix in egg and flavorings. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend dry ingredients stir in. Refrigerate 2 to 3 hrs. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Divide dough in half and roll our on lightly floured pastry cloth to 3/16 inches thick. Cut as shown above. Sprinkle with sugar. Place on lightly greased baking sheet. Bake 7 to 8 minutes, or until delicately golden. Makes five dozen 2 to 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Russian Teacakes

1 cup soft butter, 1/2 cup sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 1/4 cups flour, 1/4 tsp. salt, 3/4 cup finely chopped nuts

Mix butter, sugar and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level pour method or by sifting. Blend flour and salt, stir in. Mix in nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Roll into 1 inch balls. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. While still warm, roll in confectioners’ sugar. Cool. Roll in sugar again. Makes about four dozen 1 inch cookies.

Date-Oatmeal Cookies

3/4 cup soft shortening (half butter), 1 cup brown sugar (packed), 2 eggs, 3 tsp milk, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 cups flour, 3/4 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. salt, 2 cups cut-up dates, 3/4 cup chopped nuts

Mix shortening, brown sugar, eggs, milk and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend flour, soda and salt stir in. Mix in rolled oats, dates and nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Roll into balls size of large walnuts. Place 3 inches apart on lightly greases baking sheet. Flatten to 1/4 inches thick with bottom of glass dipped in flour. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. Makes about four dozen 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Esther Cohen is the Chief Operating Officer at Episcopal Relief & Development

Images: Esther’s cookbook accompanied by some of her favorite recipes Middle 1 — Esther’s first cookbook is signed “Love to Esther from Mom. Christmas, 1968” Middle 2 — Esther’s grandmother’s handwritten biscuit recipe and her neighbor Jane’s peanut butter blossom recipe Middle 3 — Esther as a child with her mother and two cats Mittens and Tiger.


‘Tis the Season for Family Recipes

Season’s Greetings! During December we invite you to submit your holiday recipes and memories to our ‘Family Recipe Book’ by commenting on our Facebook post and using the hashtags #EpiscopalEats and #FamilyRecipe. We can’t wait to see what yummy recipes you share.

To kick us off, in this blog Esther Cohen, our Chief Operating Officer, shares some of her favorites. Enjoy!

It’s time to haul out the holly and the flour, sugar and the red and green sprinkles. And, in my house, if it’s time to bake Christmas cookies, it’s time to haul out one of my dearest possessions—my very first cookbook.

I still have it, Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book, found under the Christmas tree in (ahem) 1968 and signed “Love to Esther from Mom.”

I’ve spent a lot of time with this book and it definitely shows its age. The binding is ripped, the pages frayed and stained. I learned how to make much more than cookies from this book. In fact, I still regularly use its recipes for meatloaf, pancakes and waffles. When I can’t remember how long to roast a turkey or how many tablespoons are in a cup, Betty Crocker is my reliable source.

The cookbook also holds old family recipes written on blank pages and stuffed into the book on index cards. My grandmother’s biscuits, my neighbor’s cookies, my sister-in-law’s meringues… my mother’s handwriting as she doubled some recipes for her hungry family. There is so much more than food in this book.

And then, there are the Christmas cookies, the ones we’ll make again this year, just as I have since (ahem) 1968. The best sugar cookie recipe in the world (hint: it uses confectioners sugar). And the Russian Teacakes, which my husband calls Mexican Teacakes (I suspect they are neither Russian nor Mexican, and I’ve never seen anyone drink tea with them, but they are pretty tasty). I’ll pull out the recipe cards with my mother-in-law’s bourbon balls, which we’ll make, and her fruitcake, which we won’t.

We’ll bake cookies for home and cookies for the cookie swap at church, cookies for the office and despite having no small children anymore—cookies for Santa.

And Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book will have a few more stains and a few more frays. And a few more memories.

Recipes From Esther’s Cookbook

Mary’s Sugar Cookies

1 1/2 cups sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 egg, 1 tsp. vanilla, 1/2 tsp. almond flavoring, 2 1/2 cups flour, 1 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. cream of tartar

Cream sugar and butter. Mix in egg and flavorings. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend dry ingredients stir in. Refrigerate 2 to 3 hrs. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Divide dough in half and roll our on lightly floured pastry cloth to 3/16 inches thick. Cut as shown above. Sprinkle with sugar. Place on lightly greased baking sheet. Bake 7 to 8 minutes, or until delicately golden. Makes five dozen 2 to 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Russian Teacakes

1 cup soft butter, 1/2 cup sifted confectioners’ sugar, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 1/4 cups flour, 1/4 tsp. salt, 3/4 cup finely chopped nuts

Mix butter, sugar and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level pour method or by sifting. Blend flour and salt, stir in. Mix in nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Roll into 1 inch balls. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. While still warm, roll in confectioners’ sugar. Cool. Roll in sugar again. Makes about four dozen 1 inch cookies.

Date-Oatmeal Cookies

3/4 cup soft shortening (half butter), 1 cup brown sugar (packed), 2 eggs, 3 tsp milk, 1 tsp. vanilla, 2 cups flour, 3/4 tsp. soda, 1 tsp. salt, 2 cups cut-up dates, 3/4 cup chopped nuts

Mix shortening, brown sugar, eggs, milk and vanilla thoroughly. Measure flour by dip-level-pour method or by sifting. Blend flour, soda and salt stir in. Mix in rolled oats, dates and nuts. Chill. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Roll into balls size of large walnuts. Place 3 inches apart on lightly greases baking sheet. Flatten to 1/4 inches thick with bottom of glass dipped in flour. Bake 10 to 12 minutes. Makes about four dozen 2 1/2 inch cookies.

Esther Cohen is the Chief Operating Officer at Episcopal Relief & Development

Images: Esther’s cookbook accompanied by some of her favorite recipes Middle 1 — Esther’s first cookbook is signed “Love to Esther from Mom. Christmas, 1968” Middle 2 — Esther’s grandmother’s handwritten biscuit recipe and her neighbor Jane’s peanut butter blossom recipe Middle 3 — Esther as a child with her mother and two cats Mittens and Tiger.


Watch the video: this water slide should not exist. (January 2022).