Traditional recipes

Dinner at New York's Baotique

Dinner at New York's Baotique

In its entirety, the space is divided: Baotique (restaurant) is located on the street-level, while Covet Lounge occupies the floor beneath. One identical trait that these "fraternal twins" share? A captivating physical attraction — displayed via brilliant restoration and interior decor located, literally, in every nook and cranny of their mutual space. Think modern-day opulence meets beaux-arts. Brilliant.

"Hi doll," Jean exclaimed from across the room as she made her grand entrance. "I need a drink."

With Baotique's seafood-heavy menu, chock-full of unique ingredients, I let Jean do the "driving." We chose to split an array of dishes:

Black Cod Dumpling Soup Docked atop a fragrant pool of lemongrass-scented seafood broth were homemade wontons filled with black cod. Delicate, fried fish skin "barges" and wilted greens served as flavorful flotation devices.


Dinner at New York's Baotique - Recipes

World renown Chef, Grant MacPherson, is the inspiration and architect of New Realm’s culinary approach. He is responsible for identifying local ingredients for our scratch menus allowing us to pair globally-inspired – locally sourced food with Mitch Steele’s award-winning beers. He is a native of Scotland, and his career has spanned 30 years and five continents, cooking for a multitude of A-list celebrities in the world of business, entertainment and politics: including U.S. presidents, British prime ministers and rock royalty.

Chef Grant has opened restaurants all over the world, from Singapore to Sydney to Russia. He’s worked with many prestigious hotel groups such as The Four Seasons, The Regent, Ritz-Carltons, Malaysia’s Datai Hotel and the Raffles Hotel Singapore (known as the “grand old lady of Far East”). In 1998 he was recruited by Las Vegas casino visionary, Steve Wynn, to head the culinary operations at the new 3,000-room Bellagio Resort & Casino and in 2003 was appointed Corporate Chef to design and open kitchens for Wynn Macau, Wynn Las Vegas, and Wynn Encore. MacPherson played a major role in transforming the dining scene in his adopted hometown of Las Vegas.

After a decade in the Steve Wynn organization and a lifelong career in the hospitality industry, Chef Grant shifted his focus to embark on boutique hotel remodels. To this effect, he served as culinary director at The Sandy Lane Hotel in Barbados, where he transformed the food and beverage program into a world-class operation. Chef Grant has cooked at the James Beard House in New York City twice, led his 105th Birthday Dinner at New York City’s Four Seasons restaurant and recently brought his culinary skills to the Crossroads Guitar Festival, also in New York City and Chicago.

Apart from the United States, Chef Grant has also cooked and collaborated in food and wine festivals around the Globe in such countries as Australia, China, South Africa, Switzerland, Scotland, and Singapore and has won numerous awards worldwide for his cooking skills including a gold medal in the 1992 Culinary Olympics in Frankfurt, Germany. In addition, he was the captain of the Singapore National Team for four consecutive years and has medaled over twenty times in culinary competitions in such cities as Niagara Falls, Sydney, Singapore, Toronto and Vancouver.

Chef Grant collaborated with Apple in Cupertino, California to work on Steve Job’s vision and design of Apple’s new campus dining facility. In addition, MacPherson was named Global Culinarian for Beech Ovens, Jade Range and Viking Commercial Range. He has been the Executive Chef of Viking Commercial since 2010. He also represented the American Pistachio Growers of the US as a Chef Ambassador. Chef Grant was the Culinary Ambassador for Stella Artois beer.

Chef Grant’s recipe book, “In the Viking Kitchen with Chef Grant MacPherson,” was released in April 2011 to huge success. He has published “Word of Mouth”, an autobiographical cookbook that takes the reader through 30 years of rock ‘n’ roll recipes and tasty tales. In addition, he worked on a Cookbook with John Legend called Host Beautifully.

Most recently, he was re-hired to assist the Food & Beverage Team to open Wynn Palace on the Cotia Strip in China with a very extensive Restaurant programing, and the The Ned in London with 9 Food & Beverage offerings. The Ned won Hotel of the year in Great Britain shortly after opening.

Chef Grant currently runs his own company, Scotch Myst, in Las Vegas, where he lives and has two teenage boys that live in Malibu, California Graeme (17) and Connor (14).


Dinner with Jackson Pollock: Recipes, Art & Nature $50.00

Jackson Pollock the artist needs no introduction—but lesser known is Jackson Pollock the gardener, baker, and dinner-party host. Food preparation for Jackson and his wife, artist Lee Krasner, was not a tiresome daily chore but an extension of their creative outlook that blossomed into a shared passion. Planting, gathering, fishing, and clamming for fresh seasonal ingredients connected Jackson to nature, which fed his inner creative terrain and in turn inspired many of his greatest works.

Featuring recipes collected from handwritten pages scrawled by Lee, Jackson, his mother, Stella, traded among their many friends in the town of Springs on Long Island, and gleaned from well-worn newspaper clippings tucked into their cookbooks and recipe files, Dinner with Jackson Pollock is a seamless blend of the fresh local ingredients Jackson and Lee grew and cooked, and the nature that in uenced their art. Robyn Lea weaves together tales from interviews with Jackson and Lee’s family and local friends, and her photographs perfectly complement these culinary records, including still lives inside the Pollock-Krasner home, Pollock’s studio, and beautiful portraits of each delectable recipe.

From starters and entrees to side dishes, breads, and desserts, more than 50 tried-and-true favorites include Stella’s Potato Pancakes, Perle Fine’s Bouillabaisse, Jackson’s Classic Rye Bread, Jackson’s Famous Spaghetti Sauce, Jackson’s Prize-Winning Apple Pie, Elaine de Kooning’s Fruit & Grain Salad, and Rita Benton’s Pecan Torte with Mocha Frosting.

Interspersed with Jackson’s masterworks and family photo album snapshots, this deeply researched volume also includes a preface by Jackson’s niece Francesca Pollock, and a foreword by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center. Dinner with Jackson Pollock is truly a unique and insightful portrait of Pollock and a delightful taste of Springs.

  • 176 pages
  • 100 illustrations
  • English language
  • Released in February 2015
  • W 9.52 x L 11.29 x D 1.02 in
  • Spiral-Bound Hardcover
  • ISBN: 9781614284321
  • 3.0 lb

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About the Author

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Jackson Pollock the artist needs no introduction—but lesser known is Jackson Pollock the gardener, baker, and dinner-party host. Food preparation for Jackson and his wife, artist Lee Krasner, was not a tiresome daily chore but an extension of their creative outlook that blossomed into a shared passion. Planting, gathering, fishing, and clamming for fresh seasonal ingredients connected Jackson to nature, which fed his inner creative terrain and in turn inspired many of his greatest works.

Featuring recipes collected from handwritten pages scrawled by Lee, Jackson, his mother, Stella, traded among their many friends in the town of Springs on Long Island, and gleaned from well-worn newspaper clippings tucked into their cookbooks and recipe files, Dinner with Jackson Pollock is a seamless blend of the fresh local ingredients Jackson and Lee grew and cooked, and the nature that in uenced their art. Robyn Lea weaves together tales from interviews with Jackson and Lee’s family and local friends, and her photographs perfectly complement these culinary records, including still lives inside the Pollock-Krasner home, Pollock’s studio, and beautiful portraits of each delectable recipe.

From starters and entrees to side dishes, breads, and desserts, more than 50 tried-and-true favorites include Stella’s Potato Pancakes, Perle Fine’s Bouillabaisse, Jackson’s Classic Rye Bread, Jackson’s Famous Spaghetti Sauce, Jackson’s Prize-Winning Apple Pie, Elaine de Kooning’s Fruit & Grain Salad, and Rita Benton’s Pecan Torte with Mocha Frosting.

Interspersed with Jackson’s masterworks and family photo album snapshots, this deeply researched volume also includes a preface by Jackson’s niece Francesca Pollock, and a foreword by Helen Harrison, director of the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center. Dinner with Jackson Pollock is truly a unique and insightful portrait of Pollock and a delightful taste of Springs.


The 9 Best Bites from Giada's Ultimate Italian Dinner at the New York City Wine & Food Festival

If the Italian feasts you know and love are reminiscent of lively parties full of friends, a bounty of pasta and pizza, and a seemingly never-ending flow of wine, you'll be happy to know that the Italian Table that Giada De Laurentiis hosted on Thursday night was just like that — only her bash featured hundreds of guests and dozens of dishes. (They needed more than one table.)

Giada kicked off the ninth-annual New York City Wine & Food Festival in true big-city fashion, bringing together chefs and restaurateurs for the ultimate rooftop soiree at Pier 92, located high atop Manhattan's Midtown. While guests enjoyed such savory and sweet bites as squid-laced pasta, chicken Parm-meatball combos and creamy panna cotta, Giada mingled with fans and took pictures with partygoers while wood-burning ovens blazed in the background.

Instead of delivering the usual red-sauce staples, chefs dished out inventive, surprising dishes, including a muffuletta sandwich, a super-spicy pizza and a seasonal panna cotta dessert. Check out 10 top bites of the night.


Fashion Makes You Hungry

After the chaos of back-to-back shows, dinner is a welcome post-Fashion Week reward. Naturally, a good bit of buzz to keep the stylish vibe going is just as essential as spot-on cooking. Both luckily unfold at these four desirable New York lairs.

Directly under the High Line is Santina, where the culinary team famous for hotspots Parm and Carbone turn out coastal Italian-inspired dishes like octopus spiedini and spaghetti blue crab. That you'll enjoy them in a striking glass-walled space is a fitting bonus.

El Colmado, Seamus Mullen's tapas restaurant inside Gotham West Market, is a bit of a schlep from the runways. Far more convenient is younger sibling El Colmado Butchery in the Meatpacking District. Plop down before 7 p.m., and happy hour yields oyster and cava specials before a round of Iberico ham croquettes and spit-roasted rotisserie chicken.

In the good-looking High Line Hotel's courtyard awaits Alta Linea. From the same folks behind L'Artusi and other go-tos, this charming spot is perfect for unwinding with a frozen Negroni (or two) before tackling low-key summer squash and artichoke sandwiches, or hefty meat and cheese plates.

Jonathan Waxman's new-old venture Jams in the 1 Hotel Central Park may be getting all the glory right now, but his West Village classic Barbuto remains a gem for soulful corn-ricotta-pickled chile bruschetta and black grouper with peperonata savored beyond the breezy garage doors.

For more Fashion Week dining recommendations, check out Flavour.


Downtown New Rochelle development to spawn new crop of dining options.

There is a lot of new building activity in downtown New Rochelle, Westchester's 'Queen City' on the Sound. The RXR multi-use high rise between Main St. and Huguenot St. is moving forward, as is construction of the new boutique V Hotel on Church Street, right off Main. The V Hotel will bring a restaurant and bar with it, as yet unnamed. Local news is reporting these projects will spawn new dining options all around the city as well.
One of the newcomers to take advantage of the changing demographic here will be Magno's Grill at 108 Centre Ave., New Rochelle. Nearing completion, the new 60-seat restaurant and bar will be operated by Angelo Magno and family. Chef Magno had previously put his talents to work at such lauded kitchens as Tango Grill and Gaucho Grill in White Plains. Magno's Grill will offer Italian and Argentinean specialties.
Heard anything else? More on these exciting developments soon.


Day 3: Iconic New York

Start your day off in the beautiful Grand Central Terminal. This historic train station is one of the most famous filming locations in New York City. I love people watching here although try to stay out of the way. For something off the beaten path, find the whispering gallery where your voice echoes!

Head to the New York Public Library and pass the landmarks (the Chrysler & Empire State Building) to take in the architecture. My favorite is the Chrysler building, which was known as the ugliest building in New York when it was built.

For lunch, eat at Shake Shack with the rest of Manhattan in Bryant Park. (Dress warmly in winter since there’s no seating!). In Bryant Park, you can watch people ice skate in winter while you eat! Nearby, I have a soft spot for browsing the giant Macy’s in Herald Square.

If you’re an art lover, visit the Museum of Modern Art. MoMa is a world-class museum for a reason and I strongly recommend checking the recent exhibitions to see what is on.

If not, enjoy shopping along Fifth Avenue. The Christmas windows here during November and December are spectacular and free. My personal favorite is Bloomingdale’s! Read more tips about New York over the holidays.

Dinner doesn’t need to be expensive to be good. Go to Halal Guys for cheap/delicious take-out chicken and rice, Pio Pio for fantastic Peruvian food, or Empanada Mama for empanadas. After dinner, watch the sunset and take in the incredible skyline (with a cocktail in hand) at the Pod 39 Rooftop.

Enjoy the bright lights of Times Square at night. (Trust me, it’s like daytime.) If you’re on a budget, I like to head to Hell’s Kitchen for more budget drinks and late-night snacks.

Day 4: The Perfect Classic NYC Itinerary

Pick up a bagel with lox from Zabar’s or get a boozy brunch at Calle Ocho. To be honest, anywhere with a good bagel and a coffee should work as long as it’s not Dunkin Donuts.

Head to the American Museum of Natural History if you’re with kids OR the Met for a few hours! In the Met, I love the Egyptian temple, Musical Instruments, Armor, and pre-20th century art. Don’t miss the rooftop garden for amazing views. Bring your own yogurt for a Gossip Girl photo. (XOXO)

In good weather, you could spend the whole day in Central park lounging, but the Met is one of my favorite museums in the world with a world-class collection. The Met doesn’t have suggested admission anymore, but it’s still a great museum. The American Museum of National History is also a fantastic museum and better suited to families as well as science lovers. Click for a guide to the Upper East Side!

Head to Central Park. I recommend finding the Belvedere Castle, the Bethesda Terrace, Sheep Meadow for lazy picnics, and the Boathouse. If you’re a runner, I strongly recommend trying to run the Reservoir one morning.

In summer, check the Summerstage program ahead for free music shows! This yearly music festival in New York brings in well-known as well as upcoming artists for free shows in Central Park. It’s great to make a day out of it.

For a nicer modern meal, visit the Thalia or the Russian Tea Room. For a casual, very New York meal, try a (famous) NYC hot dog? Don’t buy it from a cart Only buy from Gray’s Papaya with a smoothie like a local. Have the real New York famous cheesecake at Junior’s for dessert.


Lemony egg soup with escarole

From What's for Dinner? at The New York Times What's for Dinner? at The New York Times by Melissa Clark

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  • Categories: Egg dishes Soups Winter Greek
  • Ingredients: lemons eggs escarole chicken stock rice


Wondrous, fascinating and tasty: Brood X cicadas are ready for their closeup - and a wok

Cicadas: They’re what’s for dinner. Or breakfast, lunch or even – gasp – dessert.

They can be candied, coated in chocolate, stir-fried, baked into banana bread, folded into tacos, encased in dumplings and sprinkled on pizza.

While many residents of 15 states await with bated breath and not a little trepidation the emergence of trillions of Brood X cicadas from the 64-degree spring soil, others are sharpening their knives and heating up their grills.

These treasures have been growing up right beneath our feet for 17 years, and are now ready to make their way aboveground, mate and finish out their life cycle. They have already begun surfacing in Maryland, Georgia, Tennessee, North Carolina and Virginia, according to Cicada Mania. In northern Georgia they have started “chorusing,” making their cacophonous mating sounds. To map them, download the app from Cicada Safari. When in full force, there will be as many as a million per acre.

For some cicadas, that life cycle will end in a frying pan. Or, in the case of Seattle-based self-styled bug chef David George Gordon, a wok.

There are 15 known broods of cicadas around the U.S., all of them spending varying amounts of time underground, incubating as they sip sap from tree roots – the norm being 13 or 17 years – and then making their way to the surface in nymph form.

Once they hit the air, they find a tree to climb and shed their nymph skin, entering the teneral stage – “creamy white, with a few blushes of yellow,” as The Washington Post describes it. The exoskeleton of these newly hatched adults hasn’t yet been firmed up by outside exposure, and that’s when you grab them. Eaten in this stage, Gordon said, they’re akin to noshing on soft-shell crab.

These are best collected in the early morning, entomologists say. The next step is to either dump them in boiling water for a few minutes to kill any germs, or freeze them overnight – though experts note that freezing will change the texture and is best done if the bugs are to be roasted.

“That’s the most humane way of dispatching them,” Gordon, author of “The Eat-a-Bug Cookbook,” told the Daily News of the freezer treatment. “They drift off into a deep sleep and never wake up, basically.”

After that, you can have your way with them, or store them further, though some people eat them raw – even alive.

“If you want to save them for later you can put them into olive oil,” Gordon said. “So it’s kind of like sun-dried tomatoes, at that point.”

That makes stir-frying them easy, since they’re already oiled. He cautioned that it’s important to monitor the cicadas while they’re cooking, lest they burst. Their exoskeleton, while not terribly hard, encases their body, and if it gets too hot that can split open with a splat.

“So that’s why I like a wok – you can see them actually inflate a little bit and move them away from the high heat,” he said, before they explode.

Insect consumption is ubiquitous almost everywhere except the U.S. In fact, a good 80% of the world’s cultures eat bugs, Gordon said. A 2013 United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) report urged people to turn to insects as a go-to protein source.

“We’re into the 20% that thinks it’s bizarre,” he said. “We’re in the minority.”

After all, eating creatures with exoskeletons is nothing new to us humans. That just makes cicadas anthropods, and we eat plenty of those from the sea – shrimp, lobster and crab. Indeed, entomologists caution that people allergic to shellfish should consult their doctor before indulging in a cicada.

The Onondaga Nation celebrates cicadas, which saved them from starvation at the hands of then–General George Washington and the Continental Army, which waged a 1779 campaign to destroy Native crops and food.

“It was a terrible time for our people,” Onondaga Nation citizen Betty Lyons, executive director of the nonprofit American Indian Law Alliance, told Indian Country Today. “Our ancestors ran into the forest in order to survive. But then they heard this beautiful humming noise. It was the children who said, ‘Listen, they’re telling us they’re here to save us.’ And it was the children who told the people to eat the cicadas.”

To this day the Onondaga celebrate their own region’s cicadas, in their case Brood VII, which last appeared in 2018. It’s a way of honoring their ancestors, Lyons said.

New York City denizens will not have access to the tasty creatures, as Brood X does not live in the metropolitan area, noted Connecticut entomologist John Cooley.


Rachel Uchitel, former Tiger Woods mistress, in recovery after brain surgery

The former Tiger Woods mistress was fully conscious in a hospital bed Wednesday, a day after her surgery for Chiari Malformation at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

Contacted by the Daily News, Uchitel said she was still in "so much pain" but was thankful.

The surgery was conducted by world-renowned neurosurgeon Dr. Philip Steig, she said.

Chiari Malformation is a painful condition in which brain tissue extends into the spinal canal.

After several more days in the hospital she hopes to make a full recovery.

Before the Tiger Woods scandal, Uchitel, now 40, famously lost her fiancé in the 9/11 terror attack.

She now owns a children's boutique on the Upper West Side named after her daughter Wyatt Lily.

Her ex-husband Matthew Hahn was arrested earlier this month for allegedly harassing her.

The brunette bombshell told cops Hahn bombarded her with calls over a three-day period starting Sept. 4 and made threats that caused her to fear for her safety, court records show.

"I hope you die," he allegedly raged at one point, a well-placed source told The News.


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