Traditional recipes

Girlfriend Makes 300 Sandwiches For Her Boyfriend to Propose

Girlfriend Makes 300 Sandwiches For Her Boyfriend to Propose

A food blogger/writer says she is '124 sandwiches (now 123) away from an engagement ring,’ of reaching her goal of 300 for her boyfriend to propose. Though she says that his request is a joke, one thing is for sure: she is serious about making and chronicling all of those sandwiches.

Stephanie Smith is a senior reporter at the New York Post and also the author of her blog 300 Sandwiches.

Smith wrote in a NY Post article that her boyfriend, Eric Schulte, is the gourmet cook of their relationship, but has always asked her to make him a sandwich. One day, Smith caved in and made him turkey and Swiss on toasted wheat bread. After finishing he made a comment.

“Honey, you’re 300 sandwiches away from an engagement ring!” Schulte said.

And that’s what inspired Smith to create her blog. But, is she serious?

There has been a lot of buzz around the ‘Net saying that she is regressing the old idea that women belong in the kitchen.

Schulte suggested in the Post’s article that he was one of those boyfriends with a “make-me-a-sandwich” attitude.

“You women read all these magazines to get advice on how to keep a man, and it’s so easy,” Schulte said. “We’re not complex. Just do something nice for us. Like make me a sandwich.”

However, Smith says in another NY Post article that the blog is a challenge to see if she and her boyfriend could actually create 300 different sandwich recipes. She says people are taking the concept too literally.

The idea of the blog does seem sexist (and ridiculous, if that’s actually what her boyfriend had in mind). But, all that aside, those sandwiches look incredibly tasty.

We hope that after all of the publicity that has been surrounding her blog, she gets her engagement ring way before they make the 300th sandwich.

Better start saving, Eric. And maybe throw in a sandwich with that.


Girl Who Thinks Sandwiches Will Get Her a Husband Settles For a Book Deal

How many sandwiches do you have to make until you get a book deal? If you’re New York Post writer Stephanie Smith, the answer is “less than 300.”

Smith sparked a wave of outrage in September after writing a troll-ish column in the Post about how her boyfriend, New York City developer Eric Schulte, promised to propose to her after she made him 300 sandwiches. “Maybe I needed to show him I could cook to prove that I am wife material,” Smith wrote, echoing tasteless, archaic sentiments that feminists have attempted to stamp out for decades without betraying a single glimmer of self-awareness.

Now, Smith has landed what she probably always wanted anyway: a book deal. Random House’s newest imprint, Zinc Ink, will publish Smith’s accounting of her quest to snag a husband through superior sandwich making. Naturally, it’s slated to hit shelves on Valentine’s Day 2015.


300 Sandwiches: The Secret To Boyfriend's Heart?

What makes a guy put a ring on it? New York Post reporter Stephanie Smith hopes 300 sandwiches will be her answer.

It all started after one particularly tasty turkey sandwich she made for her boyfriend. Smith says that the sandwich was so good, he said, "You're, like, 300 sandwiches away from an engagement ring."

So Smith got cookin' and is sharing her journey of food and love through her blog, 300sandwiches.com. It features a daily gourmet sandwich recipe.

Critics have taken to social media, blasting her for twisting herself into a pretzel to please her man.

Host Michel Martin spoke with Smith about her blog, the criticism she's been receiving, and why she hasn't proposed.

Interview Highlights

Why Sandwiches

We had been dating for over a year and he had cooked many of the meals in our house and I just wasn't that strong in the kitchen. But the running joke between us was, the only thing he wanted was for me to make him sandwiches. So one day, I did.

On The Criticism

I encourage [critics] to read the blog, and read all of the stories that have taken us from sandwich one to now 179. . It's not just a girl making all this food to earn a man's love. This is a journey between the two of us as we continue on towards engagement. And I don't think I'm less of a woman or a hard-charging career woman because I want to do something nice for my boyfriend.

'Make Me A Sandwich'

I've gotten so many great stories from people who have also bonded with loved ones, children or parents through food or particularly sandwiches. . We use the phrase "make me a sandwich." It's like a euphemism for, you know, "give me a kiss," or "show me some lovin'" and I think people can start to use that in the same way.

Sandwich #130 - "Weekend Productivity" Mozzarella and Homemade Pesto BLT (from 300sandwiches.com)

2 buns or baguettes, cut into sandwich sized pieces (about 5" long)

1/3 cup grated Parmesan or Pecorino Romano cheese

1/2 ball mozzarella, sliced

2 more tablespoons olive oil (to dress arugula)

Make the pesto: in a food processor, combine basil, pine nuts, garlic, cheese, salt and pepper. Slowly add the olive oil as you blend the ingredients on medium speed in processor. Add juice from squeeze of lemon wedge and give pesto one last pulse to make sure lemon juice is evenly blended.

Fry bacon to desired crispness in a non-stick skillet on medium low heat. Remove from heat and drain grease from bacon on paper towel-lined plate. Toast baguette. Remove from heat and lay out on cutting board or plate. Dress arugula in a tablespoon of olive oil and salt and pepper.

Slather on pesto, then layer on arugula, tomato, then mozzarella, then a leaf or two of basil, then bacon. Top with a small dollop of pesto, then top with other slice of bread. Smush gently and serve. Makes two 5" BLTs.


'300 Sandwiches': 10 films to make out of the book

The internet briefly went crazy a few weeks ago over 300 Sandwiches, the blog/cry for help written by a woman whose boyfriend promised her an engagement ring if she could only make him 300 sandwiches — precisely the kind of romantic-comedy behavior that seems somewhat unseemly when it becomes real-life behavior. But now we’ll be able to ponder the romantic implications of the Pumpkin Biscuit, Bacon, and Scrambled Egg Sandwich beyond the world of inadvertently hilarious blogs. The New York Post reports that Stephanie Smith — the author of 300 Sandwiches and coincidentally a writer for the Post — now has a book deal, because this is still America, and if you can’t get a husband then at least you can get a book deal, amiright, ladies?

Of course, this could — nay should — be just the tip of the iceberg. (Lettuce.) After all, the vaguely similar ticking-clock-romance website 40 Days of Dating is getting its own movie. And how many sandwiches did they even eat in their 40 days of dating? Not 300, that’s for sure. This could be a whole franchise. This could be a whole linked series of franchises. Below, our 10 humble suggestions for movies derived from the ﲾr-popular 300 Sandwiches brand:

300 Sandwiches: Start simple. It’s a romantic comedy about a hardworking professional who is so focused on her career that she never learned how to cook. She’s in a long-term relationship with a handsome hipster lothario who doesn’t think he can commit to just one woman. They make a bet: She’ll cook 300 sandwiches and he’ll put a ring on it. Shenanigans ensue when her sandwiches become so popular that she opens a food truck. Stars Paula Patton and Alexander Skarsgard.

300 Sandwiches, One Day: Screw simple. Let’s Love Actually this. On the hottest day of the year in New York City, a popular sandwich shop in the Upper West Side announces a hunt for the perfect sandwich. Various will-they-or-won’t-they-probably-they-will couples converge, played by a cast of beloved actors gracefully accepting paychecks, in a panoramic film about finding love between the slices. Directed by Garry Marshall.

Our Life in 300 Sandwiches: In this tearjerking romantic drama, an elderly couple looks back on their life and wild love affair, every sequence of which somehow revolves around sandwiches. There’s a time-travel twist and Rachel McAdams is involved, probably.

300 Sandwiches is a Dish Best Sliced Cold: Think Fatal Attraction meets Julie & Julia. An unhinged interior decorator becomes obsessed with a handsome young chef, and when he bluntly jokes that he’ll never marry her unless she makes him 300 sandwiches, her obsessions spirals into madness and culinary exploration. Sharon Stone cameos as the seen-it-all sous-chef who knows that there’s nothing more dangerous than a woman with a bread-knife.

300 Sandwitches: Witches are hot right now, right?

300 Sandwiches: Recipe for Disaster: Crusading private investigator Stephanie Stone (Kerry Washington) races against the microwave clock when a radical hacktivest-turned-criminal kingpin (Benedict Cumberbatch) announces that 300 poisoned sandwiches have been released into the Los Angeles food truck subculture𠉪nd if she tells the authorities, he’ll blow them all up. That’s right: The poisoned sandwiches also contain explosives!

Stephanie Sandwich and the Book of Heroes:A sassy teenager’s life gets turned upside-down when her mother marries a mysterious and handsome European millionaire. Inside her stepfather’s castle, young Stephanie (Lily Collins, why not) discovers a dogeared cookbook containing 300 sandwich recipes. Every time she makes a sandwich, she develops a strange new superpower. But the true mystery behind the myth of the Book of Heroes will drive her to the edge of the world𠉪nd beyond. (Part 1 of a possible seven-part trilogy.)

300 Shades of Sandwich: It’s just Fifty Shades of Grey with the names changed, and also sometimes they end sentences with “…like a sandwich.”

300: Battle of the Sandwich: The Frank Miller Spartan franchise departs even further from recorded history in this sidequel that dares to suggest that Leonidas survived the battle at Thermopylae only to be forced into simultaneous warfare with the Persians and the Mongols, which means his army is sandwiched between them, like a sandwich. Rated R for extreme violence and sandwiches.

The Legend of Sandwiches: 300 Slices: Actually, let’s make it a videogame. In this indie-game sensation, you play as Double S, a woman fighting her way through 300 levels of goblins and cyborgs with nothing but her carving knife. She needs to find 300 sandwiches in order to free her love from purgatory. But the big twist is that her love is actually using her, and the “sandwiches” she thought she was finding were actually weapons, and in the end, she has to fight the man she loves to save the world and herself. Pretentious critics everywhere praise Legend of the Sandwiches as 𠇊 landmark work in the history of the interactive medium,” while non-pretentious critics call it 𠇋oring” and give it a withering A- Metacritic score.


Stephanie Smith Releases New Book '300 Sandwiches: A Multilayered Love Story'

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

A fox carefully layered cold cuts and bread to carve up a five-decker masterpiece.

ABC News' Nikki Battiste visits Peanut Butter & Company to make the "Pregnant Lady" sandwich.

A man used a popular sandwich shop's own phone to complain to 911 operators.

Now Playing: Fox Makes Himself a Huge Sandwich

Now Playing: Unique Sandwich Combines Pickles and Peanut Butter

Now Playing: Conn. Man Calls 911 for Sandwich Complaint

Now Playing: Entertainment choices to binge this weekend

Now Playing: Bruno Mars becomes 1st artist to have 5 diamond-certified singles

Now Playing: Eurovision: A worldwide spectacle

Now Playing: The Rundown: Top headlines today: May 21, 2021

Now Playing: Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: A conversation with Asian comedians

Now Playing: Finding healing in humor: Standing in solidarity against anti-Asian hate

Now Playing: How Colin Gerner is paying it forward after losing his brother to brain cancer

Now Playing: Avicii's dad discusses mental health awareness

Now Playing: Disrupting Asian expectations and family pressure: A career in comedy

Now Playing: Asian Dating Life: Navigating the world of cross-cultural relationships

Now Playing: Asian stereotypes in comedy…humorous or harmful?

Now Playing: Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: A conversation with Asian comedians

Now Playing: Nicole Beharie on how ‘Solos’ shows a ‘slice of life’ into ‘not-too-distant future’


300 Sandwiches Couple Just Got Engaged, After Only 256 Sandwiches

Remember the 300 sandwiches lady? The one who had to make her boyfriend 300 sandwiches in order for him to propose? They just got engaged -- 256 sandwiches later.

In June 2012, Stephanie Smith started a blog to document the sandwiches she needed to make in exchange for a ring. If you aren't familiar with this story yet, you read that line correctly. Stephanie Smith started a blog to document the 300 sandwiches she needed to make her boyfriend in order for him to propose. Smith has since been making sandwiches for said boyfriend -- Eric -- and documenting them on her blog 300 Sandwiches.

“You’ve been up for 15 minutes and you haven’t made me a sandwich?” This was the refrain Smith heard every morning from her boyfriend, Eric, she told the New York Post in September. When Smith made Eric a sandwich one day, he told her, "Honey, you’re 300 sandwiches away from an engagement ring!” So began the sandwich-making journey and a fury of predictably angry reactions as her blog gained traction in the media.

On May 20th, 256 sandwiches later, Smith posted on her blog that Eric had proposed. Smith was "working on sandwich 257. I guess neither one of us could wait until #300," she wrote. After all that, they stopped 44 sandwiches shy. Sandwich #256 must have been pretty good! According to Smith's blog, the sandwich was called "Kite Surf Fuel:" Arepas with cheddar cheese, scrambled eggs, tomato and onion. See here for a full description and photo of #256.

The couple got engaged in Barbados, but that's about all we know for now. Maybe he made her a sandwich for a change.

Eric, we think it's high time you made your sweetheart, and all of us, some of our favorite sandwiches:


300 Sandwiches Woman Wins War Of Attrition Against Now-Fiancé

A 21st century woman so fiercely determined to entrap her boyfriend in eternal matrimony that she publicly shamed him into proposing using several hundred sandwich recipes has finally achieved her life's most important goal. Congratulations on your engagement, 300 Sandwiches Lady! Sub-congratulations on successfully undoing years of hard-won feminism using only a WordPress account and bread!

"Words cannot express how extraordinarily happy I am," Post reporter Stephanie Smith wrote on her now infamous blog today. "Not because I have a engagement ring, but because I’m going to spend the rest of my life having ridiculously amazing adventures with my soul mate." Question: What sort of baguette is best for committing Seppuku?

Smith was not, in fact, forced to craft 300 sandwiches before the proposal of her dreams/threats was realized—sensing that he was under the bread knife, her boyfriend "E" popped the question just after Sandwich 257, amid thinly concealed intimidation tactics casually woven into entries about kite surfing:

But there’s one thing he doesn’t do: surprises. People keep asking if we’re getting married here. “No,” E told me. Okay, so no surprise wedding here. And I doubt there’s an engagement ring tucked inside his sandy kitesurfing bag packed with kites, ropes, board shorts and sunscreen. My parents still hold out hope he’ll surprise me with a ring this week. I think he’s concentrating more on the wind than on a proposal.

"Oh, no pressure, E, frail mother and throat cancer-addled father probably still have another few months in them before they shuffle loose the mortal coil, their only wish being to see a rock on my finger before they suck in their final breaths," croons the entry's subtext.

E is either a little dumb or desperate to get the fuck out of this relationship, because he somehow missed the warning after Sandwich #254, literally called the "'Everybody’s Doing It' Pulled Pork Gyros with Red Cabbage, Roasted Tomatoes and Cilantro," in which Smith admits she had "one of those 'everyone is engaged but me' moments yesterday."

I swore I would not put pressure on E to propose. But after 254 sandwiches, I wondered how much longer would I have to hold out for an engagement. Even George Freaking Clooney put a ring on the finger of that hot international lawyer he’s been dating FOR ONLY SIX MONTHS. She must have made him one hell of a sandwich.

Smith's voice, even in writing, has elevated to a pitch that only artisanal hot dogs pressed carefully into a pretzel roll (SANDWICH 193 HAHAHA) could hear:

It makes me sad to even think I was jealous of them, and sad to think E is reading this and thinking he’s making me sad because he hasn’t popped the question yet (I have a knot in my throat typing this). I don’t want him to think he better propose or else I’ll be unhappy. But I think I gave him that impression.

I just did the absolute worst thing a girlfriend could do: I made him feel guilty about proposing.

If only her feelings of guilt were powerful enough to stop her from publishing it. I take it back, though. Smith is not anti-feminist. She is the grand empress of leveraging power to her advantage, which makes her manipulative, sociopathic and possibly evil. But it also makes her a genius.

Ousted Times executive editor Jill Abramson was characterized as "pushy"—a term designated almost exclusively for women who dare to throw their weight around in a way that's threatening to men—in addition to the fact that she was found to make significantly less than her male predecessor. As long as women still experience such galling degrees of marginalization, why not use the tools at their disposal to get what they want? And so, Smith did.

As for you, E: Your Sandwich Prison will be small, and it will only grow smaller with time. Chew carefully.


Woman Trades 300 Sandwiches for a Diamond Ring

Some afternoons, I will be eating a delicious sandwich alone at my computer when the Internet will heave up a personal essay so poorly conceived and utterly vacuous that it threatens to compromise my ability to ever love again. But today, the Internet came for my sandwich.

“I’m 124 Sandwiches Away From an Engagement Ring” is the unfortunately true story of how New York Post Page Six senior reporter Stephanie Smith fell in love with a vampiric computer programmer who demanded that she make him a sandwich every day. (“You’ve been up for 15 minutes and you haven’t made me a sandwich?” he’d coo each morning when they awoke). Smith finally obliged, and the rest is … this bleak relationship-themed sandwich recipe blog-turned-New York Post essay. Writes Smith:

To him, sandwiches are like kisses or hugs. Or sex. “Sandwiches are love,” he says. “Especially when you make them. You can’t get a sandwich with love from the deli.”

One lazy summer afternoon just over a year ago, I finally gave in. I assembled turkey and Swiss on toasted wheat bread. I spread Dijon mustard generously on both bread slices, and I made sure the lettuce was perfectly in line with the neatly stacked turkey slices.

Eric devoured the sandwich as if it were a five-star meal, diving in with large, eager bites. “Babes, this is delicious!” he exclaimed.

As he finished that last bite, he made an unexpected declaration of how much he loved me and that sandwich: “Honey, you’re 300 sandwiches away from an engagement ring!”

I paused. … Maybe I needed to show him I could cook to prove that I am wife material. If he wanted 300 sandwiches, I’d give him 300 sandwiches — and I’d blog about it.

I asked friends for suggestions, but some, especially my single friends, were less than supportive of the idea.

“How ‘Stepford Wives’ of you!” said one single gal whose kitchen was used for shoe storage.

Another, a hard-working C-suite banking executive, also objected. “It’s not 1950!” she exclaimed. “It’s chauvinistic! He’s saying, ‘Cook for me, woman, and maybe I’ll make you my wife.’

Is “I’m 124 Sandwiches Away From an Engagement Ring” a chauvinist exercise? Ha, ha. If only we had the luxury of grappling with such advanced questions here. No. We are in “plant or animal?” territory now. Is “I’m 124 Sandwiches Away From an Engagement Ring” even human? If I produce 300 widgets for him, he will award me a whatsit. I’ve only got 124 more widgets to go before the deal is finalized. Then, I will reproduce the details of the transaction in a coffee table book and start raking in the whosits. Beep boop beep boop beep! Sandwiches are love!

How do we make sense of love in the time of “I’m 124 Sandwiches Away From an Engagement Ring”? The traditional romantic structures that previously organized our physical and emotional connections to other people are crumbling fast. Nobody buys one another root beer floats anymore. Everybody’s touching everybody else before they marry anyone. There are no boyfriends here. In the face of all this romantic disruption, some lovers are frantically constructing new frameworks—diamond-fishing sandwich blogs, for example—in a desperate attempt to reduce our strange and wonderful human experiences into another rote mechanical exercise. Stop. Love each other. Eat sandwiches. Don’t trade either of them for anything.


The Woman Who Made 300 Sandwiches Finds Her Wedding Dress

I was completely unprepared for a wedding when I got engaged.

I had never seen a full episode of “Say Yes to the Dress.” I had never wrapped bed sheets around my body, Grecian-style, and walked down my hallway humming “Here Comes The Bride.” I had never ripped sketches of white, bell shaped dresses out of my third grade Trapper Keeper.

I’m the woman who started the controversial food and romance blog 300sandwiches.com, tracking my quest to make 300 sandwiches before my boyfriend, Eric, proposed. Eric, who was a lovely cook, joked I was “300 sandwiches away from an engagement ring” after I made him a simple turkey and Swiss. I spent two years making peanut butter and jellies and BLTs and meatball hoagies to cook my way to an engagement. At 257, Eric popped the question.

One might assume that any woman so determined to earn a proposal would have plotted out every aspect of her potential wedding, down to the lace and beaded white gown with the 4’ train. But I didn’t.

Sure I had dreamt about Mr. Right. As a kid in pigtails, I envisioned us living together in our modern contemporary house with floor to ceiling windows and a Jeep Wrangler parked in the driveway. I thought about the moment he would propose and how shocked and speechless I would be, while trying not to “ugly cry.” But my daydreams never drifted past the point of engagement. No wedding, no vows, no three-course dinner at a country club. And certainly no dress.

The author trying on a dress at Vera Wang.

In my adult years, I became a reporter for The New York Post’s Page Six column and covered celebrity weddings (along with divorces). Prior to that, I wrote for the fashion newspaper Women’s Wear Daily, and studied the industry’s titans—Vera Wang, Oscar de la Renta, Calvin Klein. I spent my working hours writing about other people’s weddings and dresses, but never did I surmise what I wanted for myself.

And then I got engaged. It was time to do a different kind of research.

I booked appointments at bridal salons with my mother and two trusted fashionable friends in tow. I tried on mermaid style ball gowns and fitted silk dresses with sweetheart necklines. Store clerks oohed and ahhed, fanning out trains as I walked out of one dressing room after another. Everything fell into two categories: prom queen or uptown private school princess. I am neither.

I parked my browser on Pinterest, begging something to speak to me. There were dresses for galloping through a lavender field in cowboy boots, or striding through a candlelit garden, hair slicked back in a chignon tighter than a corset. Nope. And absolutely not.

A wedding dress isn’t a costume. I needed something that was authentic to me, that showcased the best of me. For that, I needed to take a long hard look at who I was: I’d lived in New York for 15 years. A survivor of the New York dating scene, I’d kissed and dated and been dumped by a lot of frogs and thankfully the only scars I have to show from it are a few nasty text messages. I was an independent woman in charge of her own life (even if that meant choosing to make her man 300 sandwiches after he made a silly joke because she is hell-bent on getting the last laugh). I felt confident, and I wanted a dress that reflected that same self-awareness.

If I were getting married a decade earlier, my dress of choice would be different. At 25, I was insecure and still searching for my identity. I second-guessed all of my decisions: career choices, toxic friendships, fashion trends (what was with my obsession with vintage kimono dresses that looked like couch slipcovers from the 70s?). A tulle ball gown might have been suitable for that life stage, the more fabric to hide underneath, the better. Sequins would have made me sparkle in the crowd, since I always feared not being pretty enough, skinny enough, or…well, enough.

The author in her wedding dress. Photo: 300 Sandwiches

But I didn’t need that armor. I wanted something light and body conscious, something that would reveal the best of me—my body and my heart, warts and all.

Turns out I didn’t find that dress on the rack. I designed my perfect dress with my bridesmaid and designer Caroline Fare, who made a lace gown by hand. It hugs my curves, with a hint of sparkle, and reflects my life at this very moment–blissfully content, and independently happy.

The author’s new book, 300 Sandwiches: A Multilayered Love Story … with Recipes, is available now.


How to get your man to propose: make him 300 sandwiches

ONE woman is using a tried and tested formula - food - to convince her boyfriend to put a ring on it. She’s on a mission - one sandwich at a time. And don’t hold the dill.

A chicken, bacon, lettuce and pear sandwich. Nom nom nom. Photo: Rene Cervantes Source:Supplied

WHAT lengths would you go to get your partner to propose?

One woman is using a tried and tested formula — food — to convince her boyfriend to put a ring on it.

Stephanie Smith, a reporter for The New York Post’s Page Six column, started a blog documenting her quest to woo her boyfriend Eric with delicious bread and meat creations.

Here’s her account of how 300sandwiches.com came to be:

My boyfriend, Eric, is the gourmet cook in our relationship, but he𠆝 always want me to make him a sandwich. To him, sandwiches are like kisses or hugs. Or sex.

“Sandwiches are love,” he says. 𠇎specially when you make them. You can’t get a sandwich with love from the deli.”

One lazy summer afternoon just over a year ago, I finally gave in. I assembled turkey and Swiss on toasted wheat bread. I spread Dijon mustard generously on both bread slices, and I made sure the lettuce was perfectly in line with the neatly stacked turkey slices.

Eric devoured the sandwich as if it were a five-star meal, diving in with large, eager bites. �s, this is delicious!” he exclaimed.

As he finished that last bite, he made an unexpected declaration of how much he loved me and that sandwich: “Honey, you’re 300 sandwiches away from an engagement ring!”

Was our happily ever after as simple as making him a few sandwiches?

A banh mi roll created by Stephanie for her sandwich-loving boyfriend. Photo: Rene Cervantes Source:Supplied

Our relationship has always centred on food. We met at a restaurant in Chelsea two years ago when a friend I was dining with spotted an Alexander Skarsgard look-alike. An introduction was made, and I found out he’s a computer programmer, a Taurus (or as he says, “What’s that sign for people who don’t believe in astrology?”), obsessed with Star Wars and a very good cook.

On our second date, he cooked me dinner — tuna tartare and fresh scallops on a tomato compote. More delicious meals, nearly all of them cooked by him, followed, and soon we were dating seriously. The fact that he could make a perfect filet mignon, not just order one in a steakhouse, was a big turn-on.

A year ago, we moved in together to a sleek place in Brooklyn. We’ve met each other’s parents, travelled internationally without strangling each other and successfully hosted many a dinner party.

Things were moving at a natural pace, but I wondered what it would take for him to propose. I’m in my mid-30s, and my parents have been happily married for more than 35 years. I have always valued the commitment and dedication it takes to get married and stay married. Call me old-fashioned, but I𠆝 like to raise a family with someone who feels likewise.

Maybe I needed to show him I could cook to prove that I am wife material. If he wanted 300 sandwiches, I𠆝 give him 300 sandwiches — and I𠆝 blog about it.

I bought the 300sandwiches.com domain name and a Nikon DSLR. I perused tons of recipe sites and cookbooks for sandwich ideas. I asked friends for suggestions, but some, especially my single friends, were less than supportive of the idea.

“How ‘Stepford Wives’ of you!” said one single gal whose kitchen was used for shoe storage.

Another, a hardworking C-suite banking executive, also objected. “It’s not 1950!” she exclaimed. “It’s chauvinistic! He’s saying, 𠆌ook for me, woman, and maybe I’ll make you my wife.’”

My own mother was doubtful. “Honey, can you even cook?” she asked.

A chicken, bacon, lettuce and pear sandwich. Nom nom nom. Photo: Rene Cervantes Source:Supplied

I started with the easy things. My second sandwich after the turkey and Swiss was a two-second ice-cream sandwich constructed from Anna’s ginger thin cookies and blackberry currant ice cream. My early thinking was quantity, not quality.

Ten sandwiches or so in, I did the math. Three sandwiches a week, times four weeks a month, times 12 months a year, meant I wouldn’t be done until I was deep into my 30s. How would I finish 300 sandwiches in time for us to get engaged, married and have babies before I exited my child-bearing years?

My mother was the voice of reason. “Relationships are a marathon, not a sprint,” she said. “Take it one sandwich at a time.”

I made sandwiches for breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert. I made sandwiches to get myself out of the doghouse — like No. 67, a scrambled egg, smoked salmon and chive creation that combined some of Eric’s favourite things to make up for my being 45 minutes late for dinner the night before.

Even after covering movie premieres or concerts for Page Six, I found myself stumbling into the kitchen to make Eric a sandwich while I still had on my high heels and party dress.

Stephanie Simth has made, and blogged about, 176 sandwiches for her boyfriend Eric. Photo: Rene Cervantes (New York Post) Source:Supplied

Making all of these sammies, I’ve learned how much Eric loves sharing cooking with me. He enjoys going to the grocery store with me, picking out ingredients and planning dinners.

Though I still want to get engaged and get married and live happily ever after, I’ve also put less pressure on the race to the 300th sandwich and I’m enjoying the cooking experience with Eric.

Today, I’ve made and blogged about 176 sandwiches. Over the months, my creations have grown more complex — lobster rolls, banh mi, pulled pork. No matter what’s on the menu, Eric smiles and says thank you. He’s just happy I cook for him at all.

“You women read all these magazines to get advice on how to keep a man, and it’s so easy,” he says. “We’re not complex. Just do something nice for us. Like make a sandwich.”