Traditional recipes

Pear Upside-Down Cake With Bay Leaf Glaze

Pear Upside-Down Cake With Bay Leaf Glaze

There's a new upside-down cake in town

Photo courtesy of McCormick

Pineapple upside-down cake gets a holiday makeover when pears and bay leaves replace the pineapple and an orange and bay leaf glaze stands in for the caramelized brown sugar.

Recipe courtesy of McCormick

Notes

Pear nectar may be used in place of pear brandy.

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup powdered sugar
  • 1/3 Cup orange juice
  • 12 bay leaves, divided
  • 3/4 Cups (1 1/2 sticks) butter, divided
  • 3/4 Cups milk
  • 1 Tablespoon pear brandy
  • 1 3/4 Cup granulated sugar, divided
  • 2 firm ripe pears, peeled, cored and thinly sliced
  • 1 1/2 Cup flour
  • 1 Teaspoon baking powder
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 Teaspoon McCormick All Natural Pure Vanilla Extract

The botanical name of the bay leaf has a touch of grandeur: Laurus nobilis. Perhaps that&rsquos why the Romans fashioned the deep green leaves into crowns to honor the earliest Olympic champions. Bay leaves, also called bay laurel, are still a symbol of highest achievement. Think of the honor of being called a &ldquopoet laureate&rdquo or &ldquoNobel laureate.&rdquo In other cultures, bay leaves have a long reputation for protecting against lightning, witchcraft and evil. But we think their real usefulness is in the kitchen, lending a warm undertone to soups, stews and sauces.

The bay leaf is a sturdy herb that benefits from long cooking. It&rsquos best when boiled, simmered, stewed or steeped. That&rsquos when the bay leaf&rsquos delicate flavor and subtle aroma really shine. We find that the bay leaf adds an unmistakable and comforting background note to almost any slow-cooked dish.


The botanical name of the bay leaf has a touch of grandeur: Laurus nobilis. Perhaps that&rsquos why the Romans fashioned the deep green leaves into crowns to honor the earliest Olympic champions. Bay leaves, also called bay laurel, are still a symbol of highest achievement. Think of the honor of being called a &ldquopoet laureate&rdquo or &ldquoNobel laureate.&rdquo In other cultures, bay leaves have a long reputation for protecting against lightning, witchcraft and evil. But we think their real usefulness is in the kitchen, lending a warm undertone to soups, stews and sauces.

The bay leaf is a sturdy herb that benefits from long cooking. It&rsquos best when boiled, simmered, stewed or steeped. That&rsquos when the bay leaf&rsquos delicate flavor and subtle aroma really shine. We find that the bay leaf adds an unmistakable and comforting background note to almost any slow-cooked dish.


The botanical name of the bay leaf has a touch of grandeur: Laurus nobilis. Perhaps that&rsquos why the Romans fashioned the deep green leaves into crowns to honor the earliest Olympic champions. Bay leaves, also called bay laurel, are still a symbol of highest achievement. Think of the honor of being called a &ldquopoet laureate&rdquo or &ldquoNobel laureate.&rdquo In other cultures, bay leaves have a long reputation for protecting against lightning, witchcraft and evil. But we think their real usefulness is in the kitchen, lending a warm undertone to soups, stews and sauces.

The bay leaf is a sturdy herb that benefits from long cooking. It&rsquos best when boiled, simmered, stewed or steeped. That&rsquos when the bay leaf&rsquos delicate flavor and subtle aroma really shine. We find that the bay leaf adds an unmistakable and comforting background note to almost any slow-cooked dish.


The botanical name of the bay leaf has a touch of grandeur: Laurus nobilis. Perhaps that&rsquos why the Romans fashioned the deep green leaves into crowns to honor the earliest Olympic champions. Bay leaves, also called bay laurel, are still a symbol of highest achievement. Think of the honor of being called a &ldquopoet laureate&rdquo or &ldquoNobel laureate.&rdquo In other cultures, bay leaves have a long reputation for protecting against lightning, witchcraft and evil. But we think their real usefulness is in the kitchen, lending a warm undertone to soups, stews and sauces.

The bay leaf is a sturdy herb that benefits from long cooking. It&rsquos best when boiled, simmered, stewed or steeped. That&rsquos when the bay leaf&rsquos delicate flavor and subtle aroma really shine. We find that the bay leaf adds an unmistakable and comforting background note to almost any slow-cooked dish.


The botanical name of the bay leaf has a touch of grandeur: Laurus nobilis. Perhaps that&rsquos why the Romans fashioned the deep green leaves into crowns to honor the earliest Olympic champions. Bay leaves, also called bay laurel, are still a symbol of highest achievement. Think of the honor of being called a &ldquopoet laureate&rdquo or &ldquoNobel laureate.&rdquo In other cultures, bay leaves have a long reputation for protecting against lightning, witchcraft and evil. But we think their real usefulness is in the kitchen, lending a warm undertone to soups, stews and sauces.

The bay leaf is a sturdy herb that benefits from long cooking. It&rsquos best when boiled, simmered, stewed or steeped. That&rsquos when the bay leaf&rsquos delicate flavor and subtle aroma really shine. We find that the bay leaf adds an unmistakable and comforting background note to almost any slow-cooked dish.


The botanical name of the bay leaf has a touch of grandeur: Laurus nobilis. Perhaps that&rsquos why the Romans fashioned the deep green leaves into crowns to honor the earliest Olympic champions. Bay leaves, also called bay laurel, are still a symbol of highest achievement. Think of the honor of being called a &ldquopoet laureate&rdquo or &ldquoNobel laureate.&rdquo In other cultures, bay leaves have a long reputation for protecting against lightning, witchcraft and evil. But we think their real usefulness is in the kitchen, lending a warm undertone to soups, stews and sauces.

The bay leaf is a sturdy herb that benefits from long cooking. It&rsquos best when boiled, simmered, stewed or steeped. That&rsquos when the bay leaf&rsquos delicate flavor and subtle aroma really shine. We find that the bay leaf adds an unmistakable and comforting background note to almost any slow-cooked dish.


The botanical name of the bay leaf has a touch of grandeur: Laurus nobilis. Perhaps that&rsquos why the Romans fashioned the deep green leaves into crowns to honor the earliest Olympic champions. Bay leaves, also called bay laurel, are still a symbol of highest achievement. Think of the honor of being called a &ldquopoet laureate&rdquo or &ldquoNobel laureate.&rdquo In other cultures, bay leaves have a long reputation for protecting against lightning, witchcraft and evil. But we think their real usefulness is in the kitchen, lending a warm undertone to soups, stews and sauces.

The bay leaf is a sturdy herb that benefits from long cooking. It&rsquos best when boiled, simmered, stewed or steeped. That&rsquos when the bay leaf&rsquos delicate flavor and subtle aroma really shine. We find that the bay leaf adds an unmistakable and comforting background note to almost any slow-cooked dish.


The botanical name of the bay leaf has a touch of grandeur: Laurus nobilis. Perhaps that&rsquos why the Romans fashioned the deep green leaves into crowns to honor the earliest Olympic champions. Bay leaves, also called bay laurel, are still a symbol of highest achievement. Think of the honor of being called a &ldquopoet laureate&rdquo or &ldquoNobel laureate.&rdquo In other cultures, bay leaves have a long reputation for protecting against lightning, witchcraft and evil. But we think their real usefulness is in the kitchen, lending a warm undertone to soups, stews and sauces.

The bay leaf is a sturdy herb that benefits from long cooking. It&rsquos best when boiled, simmered, stewed or steeped. That&rsquos when the bay leaf&rsquos delicate flavor and subtle aroma really shine. We find that the bay leaf adds an unmistakable and comforting background note to almost any slow-cooked dish.


The botanical name of the bay leaf has a touch of grandeur: Laurus nobilis. Perhaps that&rsquos why the Romans fashioned the deep green leaves into crowns to honor the earliest Olympic champions. Bay leaves, also called bay laurel, are still a symbol of highest achievement. Think of the honor of being called a &ldquopoet laureate&rdquo or &ldquoNobel laureate.&rdquo In other cultures, bay leaves have a long reputation for protecting against lightning, witchcraft and evil. But we think their real usefulness is in the kitchen, lending a warm undertone to soups, stews and sauces.

The bay leaf is a sturdy herb that benefits from long cooking. It&rsquos best when boiled, simmered, stewed or steeped. That&rsquos when the bay leaf&rsquos delicate flavor and subtle aroma really shine. We find that the bay leaf adds an unmistakable and comforting background note to almost any slow-cooked dish.


The botanical name of the bay leaf has a touch of grandeur: Laurus nobilis. Perhaps that&rsquos why the Romans fashioned the deep green leaves into crowns to honor the earliest Olympic champions. Bay leaves, also called bay laurel, are still a symbol of highest achievement. Think of the honor of being called a &ldquopoet laureate&rdquo or &ldquoNobel laureate.&rdquo In other cultures, bay leaves have a long reputation for protecting against lightning, witchcraft and evil. But we think their real usefulness is in the kitchen, lending a warm undertone to soups, stews and sauces.

The bay leaf is a sturdy herb that benefits from long cooking. It&rsquos best when boiled, simmered, stewed or steeped. That&rsquos when the bay leaf&rsquos delicate flavor and subtle aroma really shine. We find that the bay leaf adds an unmistakable and comforting background note to almost any slow-cooked dish.


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