Traditional recipes

Popular Seafood Spot in Plano Is as Good as Ever

Popular Seafood Spot in Plano Is as Good as Ever

Expanded seated and reservations make this restaurant better than ever

The fresh seafood case

I remember when Sea Breeze Fish Market and Grill first opened nearly a decade ago. For someone driving the 25 miles from Dallas, that was a big barrier to visiting.

Fast forward to present day and Sea Breeze has expanded, taking over the next-door premises to at least double the restaurant’s size. The extra space is a bona fide restaurant (and bar) with table service and reservations. That solves both problems with Sea Breeze 1.0. The fish market still survives and seems to do as strong a trade as ever.

The seafood menu is vast, and quality does not seem to suffer. We loved the beer-battered halibut ($17) that formed one half of our fish and chips. The batter was crispy without being fat-logged. The chips are made in house but seem not to have been given more than perfunctory thought. I would like to see thick, unpeeled fries, first cooked in the microwave for a fluffy core, then deep fried for a crisp skin. People would accuse me ofcopying elements of Graham Dodds’ fries, and that would be true. His were the best.

Corn chowder is a winner, with the sweetness of the corn juggling with the crispness of the wonton crackers. For dessert, the cheesecake is guilty pleasure number one.

The full bar means that almost any beverage is possible, and there is a respectable wine list as well, though it could do with a couple of Texas offerings.

Service was fast and friendly, making Sea Breeze a destination worth returning to.


12 Fish You Should Never Eat (and What To Eat Instead)

This dirty dozen list is made up of the least sustainable, or even toxic, species.

It was not long ago that Americans rarely thought about where their food came from, let alone the impacts of their choices. These days it&rsquos increasingly important to know not only what you&rsquore eating and where it&rsquos come from. From food co-ops, farmers markets, and community supported agriculture (CSA), to whole aisles (and grocery stores) devoted to natural, organic, local and sustainable produce&mdashAmericans and legal protections have quickly evolved to begin averting the worst problems of industrial agriculture. So though the journey to a healthy sustainable terrestrial food system is far from over, it is well underway.

Seafood, however, is more slippery. &ldquoThat&rsquos because it&rsquos the &lsquoLast of the Buffalo Hunters,&rdquo when it comes to seafood says Joe Lasprogata, Vice President of Samuels and Son Seafood Co. &ldquoThe oceans are in some ways the last source of truly wild products, and we need to be careful with those.&rdquo Samuels and Son sponsors Sustained Seas, an organization dedicated to promoting sustainable fisheries via labeling and education. Part of the reason fisheries are in trouble is that consumers didn&rsquot know the impacts of their choices.

Lasprogata says, &ldquoFor way too long there&rsquos been this surprising attitude: Fishermen believed that fisheries belonged to them, and that has led to collapse, over and over again. There was no care, no stewardship. But fisheries can absolutely be sustainable.&rdquo That confusion has continued to spill over into consumer behavior, since some people still make fish-buying decisions based on taste, price, and texture&mdashrather than perceived sustainability, according to a recent study on British Columbian consumer habits.

But it&rsquos extremely important to think about where the fish comes from, because those factors affect not only your health, but also the future of wild fish stocks, which we and countless other species depended on for our survival. &ldquoThere are lots of ways to identify a so-called &ldquoDirty Dozen&rdquo of fish, and it&rsquos crucial to be aware of overfishing, pollution, and bycatch,&rdquo says Marianne Cufone.

Cufone is the Executive Director of Recirculating Farms Coalition, an organization dedicated to creating local land-based produce and fish systems using hydro- and aquaponics, small local systems that avoid the problems of open-water fish farms and industrial agriculture altogether, where the fish waste fertilizes fresh produce. The former Director of the Fish Program of Food and Water Watch, Cufone&rsquos mission is redirecting consumers toward healthy, sustainable fish-eating. She laughs, saying, &ldquoI get a lot of texts from my friends asking me which fish are okay to eat.&rdquo

Cufone stresses that consumers can begin with a list of the 12 Worst Fish, or a &ldquoFishy Dozen&rdquo&mdashcompiled with help from experts.

Here are the 12 fish you should never eat&mdashand what to eat instead.


12 Fish You Should Never Eat (and What To Eat Instead)

This dirty dozen list is made up of the least sustainable, or even toxic, species.

It was not long ago that Americans rarely thought about where their food came from, let alone the impacts of their choices. These days it&rsquos increasingly important to know not only what you&rsquore eating and where it&rsquos come from. From food co-ops, farmers markets, and community supported agriculture (CSA), to whole aisles (and grocery stores) devoted to natural, organic, local and sustainable produce&mdashAmericans and legal protections have quickly evolved to begin averting the worst problems of industrial agriculture. So though the journey to a healthy sustainable terrestrial food system is far from over, it is well underway.

Seafood, however, is more slippery. &ldquoThat&rsquos because it&rsquos the &lsquoLast of the Buffalo Hunters,&rdquo when it comes to seafood says Joe Lasprogata, Vice President of Samuels and Son Seafood Co. &ldquoThe oceans are in some ways the last source of truly wild products, and we need to be careful with those.&rdquo Samuels and Son sponsors Sustained Seas, an organization dedicated to promoting sustainable fisheries via labeling and education. Part of the reason fisheries are in trouble is that consumers didn&rsquot know the impacts of their choices.

Lasprogata says, &ldquoFor way too long there&rsquos been this surprising attitude: Fishermen believed that fisheries belonged to them, and that has led to collapse, over and over again. There was no care, no stewardship. But fisheries can absolutely be sustainable.&rdquo That confusion has continued to spill over into consumer behavior, since some people still make fish-buying decisions based on taste, price, and texture&mdashrather than perceived sustainability, according to a recent study on British Columbian consumer habits.

But it&rsquos extremely important to think about where the fish comes from, because those factors affect not only your health, but also the future of wild fish stocks, which we and countless other species depended on for our survival. &ldquoThere are lots of ways to identify a so-called &ldquoDirty Dozen&rdquo of fish, and it&rsquos crucial to be aware of overfishing, pollution, and bycatch,&rdquo says Marianne Cufone.

Cufone is the Executive Director of Recirculating Farms Coalition, an organization dedicated to creating local land-based produce and fish systems using hydro- and aquaponics, small local systems that avoid the problems of open-water fish farms and industrial agriculture altogether, where the fish waste fertilizes fresh produce. The former Director of the Fish Program of Food and Water Watch, Cufone&rsquos mission is redirecting consumers toward healthy, sustainable fish-eating. She laughs, saying, &ldquoI get a lot of texts from my friends asking me which fish are okay to eat.&rdquo

Cufone stresses that consumers can begin with a list of the 12 Worst Fish, or a &ldquoFishy Dozen&rdquo&mdashcompiled with help from experts.

Here are the 12 fish you should never eat&mdashand what to eat instead.


12 Fish You Should Never Eat (and What To Eat Instead)

This dirty dozen list is made up of the least sustainable, or even toxic, species.

It was not long ago that Americans rarely thought about where their food came from, let alone the impacts of their choices. These days it&rsquos increasingly important to know not only what you&rsquore eating and where it&rsquos come from. From food co-ops, farmers markets, and community supported agriculture (CSA), to whole aisles (and grocery stores) devoted to natural, organic, local and sustainable produce&mdashAmericans and legal protections have quickly evolved to begin averting the worst problems of industrial agriculture. So though the journey to a healthy sustainable terrestrial food system is far from over, it is well underway.

Seafood, however, is more slippery. &ldquoThat&rsquos because it&rsquos the &lsquoLast of the Buffalo Hunters,&rdquo when it comes to seafood says Joe Lasprogata, Vice President of Samuels and Son Seafood Co. &ldquoThe oceans are in some ways the last source of truly wild products, and we need to be careful with those.&rdquo Samuels and Son sponsors Sustained Seas, an organization dedicated to promoting sustainable fisheries via labeling and education. Part of the reason fisheries are in trouble is that consumers didn&rsquot know the impacts of their choices.

Lasprogata says, &ldquoFor way too long there&rsquos been this surprising attitude: Fishermen believed that fisheries belonged to them, and that has led to collapse, over and over again. There was no care, no stewardship. But fisheries can absolutely be sustainable.&rdquo That confusion has continued to spill over into consumer behavior, since some people still make fish-buying decisions based on taste, price, and texture&mdashrather than perceived sustainability, according to a recent study on British Columbian consumer habits.

But it&rsquos extremely important to think about where the fish comes from, because those factors affect not only your health, but also the future of wild fish stocks, which we and countless other species depended on for our survival. &ldquoThere are lots of ways to identify a so-called &ldquoDirty Dozen&rdquo of fish, and it&rsquos crucial to be aware of overfishing, pollution, and bycatch,&rdquo says Marianne Cufone.

Cufone is the Executive Director of Recirculating Farms Coalition, an organization dedicated to creating local land-based produce and fish systems using hydro- and aquaponics, small local systems that avoid the problems of open-water fish farms and industrial agriculture altogether, where the fish waste fertilizes fresh produce. The former Director of the Fish Program of Food and Water Watch, Cufone&rsquos mission is redirecting consumers toward healthy, sustainable fish-eating. She laughs, saying, &ldquoI get a lot of texts from my friends asking me which fish are okay to eat.&rdquo

Cufone stresses that consumers can begin with a list of the 12 Worst Fish, or a &ldquoFishy Dozen&rdquo&mdashcompiled with help from experts.

Here are the 12 fish you should never eat&mdashand what to eat instead.


12 Fish You Should Never Eat (and What To Eat Instead)

This dirty dozen list is made up of the least sustainable, or even toxic, species.

It was not long ago that Americans rarely thought about where their food came from, let alone the impacts of their choices. These days it&rsquos increasingly important to know not only what you&rsquore eating and where it&rsquos come from. From food co-ops, farmers markets, and community supported agriculture (CSA), to whole aisles (and grocery stores) devoted to natural, organic, local and sustainable produce&mdashAmericans and legal protections have quickly evolved to begin averting the worst problems of industrial agriculture. So though the journey to a healthy sustainable terrestrial food system is far from over, it is well underway.

Seafood, however, is more slippery. &ldquoThat&rsquos because it&rsquos the &lsquoLast of the Buffalo Hunters,&rdquo when it comes to seafood says Joe Lasprogata, Vice President of Samuels and Son Seafood Co. &ldquoThe oceans are in some ways the last source of truly wild products, and we need to be careful with those.&rdquo Samuels and Son sponsors Sustained Seas, an organization dedicated to promoting sustainable fisheries via labeling and education. Part of the reason fisheries are in trouble is that consumers didn&rsquot know the impacts of their choices.

Lasprogata says, &ldquoFor way too long there&rsquos been this surprising attitude: Fishermen believed that fisheries belonged to them, and that has led to collapse, over and over again. There was no care, no stewardship. But fisheries can absolutely be sustainable.&rdquo That confusion has continued to spill over into consumer behavior, since some people still make fish-buying decisions based on taste, price, and texture&mdashrather than perceived sustainability, according to a recent study on British Columbian consumer habits.

But it&rsquos extremely important to think about where the fish comes from, because those factors affect not only your health, but also the future of wild fish stocks, which we and countless other species depended on for our survival. &ldquoThere are lots of ways to identify a so-called &ldquoDirty Dozen&rdquo of fish, and it&rsquos crucial to be aware of overfishing, pollution, and bycatch,&rdquo says Marianne Cufone.

Cufone is the Executive Director of Recirculating Farms Coalition, an organization dedicated to creating local land-based produce and fish systems using hydro- and aquaponics, small local systems that avoid the problems of open-water fish farms and industrial agriculture altogether, where the fish waste fertilizes fresh produce. The former Director of the Fish Program of Food and Water Watch, Cufone&rsquos mission is redirecting consumers toward healthy, sustainable fish-eating. She laughs, saying, &ldquoI get a lot of texts from my friends asking me which fish are okay to eat.&rdquo

Cufone stresses that consumers can begin with a list of the 12 Worst Fish, or a &ldquoFishy Dozen&rdquo&mdashcompiled with help from experts.

Here are the 12 fish you should never eat&mdashand what to eat instead.


12 Fish You Should Never Eat (and What To Eat Instead)

This dirty dozen list is made up of the least sustainable, or even toxic, species.

It was not long ago that Americans rarely thought about where their food came from, let alone the impacts of their choices. These days it&rsquos increasingly important to know not only what you&rsquore eating and where it&rsquos come from. From food co-ops, farmers markets, and community supported agriculture (CSA), to whole aisles (and grocery stores) devoted to natural, organic, local and sustainable produce&mdashAmericans and legal protections have quickly evolved to begin averting the worst problems of industrial agriculture. So though the journey to a healthy sustainable terrestrial food system is far from over, it is well underway.

Seafood, however, is more slippery. &ldquoThat&rsquos because it&rsquos the &lsquoLast of the Buffalo Hunters,&rdquo when it comes to seafood says Joe Lasprogata, Vice President of Samuels and Son Seafood Co. &ldquoThe oceans are in some ways the last source of truly wild products, and we need to be careful with those.&rdquo Samuels and Son sponsors Sustained Seas, an organization dedicated to promoting sustainable fisheries via labeling and education. Part of the reason fisheries are in trouble is that consumers didn&rsquot know the impacts of their choices.

Lasprogata says, &ldquoFor way too long there&rsquos been this surprising attitude: Fishermen believed that fisheries belonged to them, and that has led to collapse, over and over again. There was no care, no stewardship. But fisheries can absolutely be sustainable.&rdquo That confusion has continued to spill over into consumer behavior, since some people still make fish-buying decisions based on taste, price, and texture&mdashrather than perceived sustainability, according to a recent study on British Columbian consumer habits.

But it&rsquos extremely important to think about where the fish comes from, because those factors affect not only your health, but also the future of wild fish stocks, which we and countless other species depended on for our survival. &ldquoThere are lots of ways to identify a so-called &ldquoDirty Dozen&rdquo of fish, and it&rsquos crucial to be aware of overfishing, pollution, and bycatch,&rdquo says Marianne Cufone.

Cufone is the Executive Director of Recirculating Farms Coalition, an organization dedicated to creating local land-based produce and fish systems using hydro- and aquaponics, small local systems that avoid the problems of open-water fish farms and industrial agriculture altogether, where the fish waste fertilizes fresh produce. The former Director of the Fish Program of Food and Water Watch, Cufone&rsquos mission is redirecting consumers toward healthy, sustainable fish-eating. She laughs, saying, &ldquoI get a lot of texts from my friends asking me which fish are okay to eat.&rdquo

Cufone stresses that consumers can begin with a list of the 12 Worst Fish, or a &ldquoFishy Dozen&rdquo&mdashcompiled with help from experts.

Here are the 12 fish you should never eat&mdashand what to eat instead.


12 Fish You Should Never Eat (and What To Eat Instead)

This dirty dozen list is made up of the least sustainable, or even toxic, species.

It was not long ago that Americans rarely thought about where their food came from, let alone the impacts of their choices. These days it&rsquos increasingly important to know not only what you&rsquore eating and where it&rsquos come from. From food co-ops, farmers markets, and community supported agriculture (CSA), to whole aisles (and grocery stores) devoted to natural, organic, local and sustainable produce&mdashAmericans and legal protections have quickly evolved to begin averting the worst problems of industrial agriculture. So though the journey to a healthy sustainable terrestrial food system is far from over, it is well underway.

Seafood, however, is more slippery. &ldquoThat&rsquos because it&rsquos the &lsquoLast of the Buffalo Hunters,&rdquo when it comes to seafood says Joe Lasprogata, Vice President of Samuels and Son Seafood Co. &ldquoThe oceans are in some ways the last source of truly wild products, and we need to be careful with those.&rdquo Samuels and Son sponsors Sustained Seas, an organization dedicated to promoting sustainable fisheries via labeling and education. Part of the reason fisheries are in trouble is that consumers didn&rsquot know the impacts of their choices.

Lasprogata says, &ldquoFor way too long there&rsquos been this surprising attitude: Fishermen believed that fisheries belonged to them, and that has led to collapse, over and over again. There was no care, no stewardship. But fisheries can absolutely be sustainable.&rdquo That confusion has continued to spill over into consumer behavior, since some people still make fish-buying decisions based on taste, price, and texture&mdashrather than perceived sustainability, according to a recent study on British Columbian consumer habits.

But it&rsquos extremely important to think about where the fish comes from, because those factors affect not only your health, but also the future of wild fish stocks, which we and countless other species depended on for our survival. &ldquoThere are lots of ways to identify a so-called &ldquoDirty Dozen&rdquo of fish, and it&rsquos crucial to be aware of overfishing, pollution, and bycatch,&rdquo says Marianne Cufone.

Cufone is the Executive Director of Recirculating Farms Coalition, an organization dedicated to creating local land-based produce and fish systems using hydro- and aquaponics, small local systems that avoid the problems of open-water fish farms and industrial agriculture altogether, where the fish waste fertilizes fresh produce. The former Director of the Fish Program of Food and Water Watch, Cufone&rsquos mission is redirecting consumers toward healthy, sustainable fish-eating. She laughs, saying, &ldquoI get a lot of texts from my friends asking me which fish are okay to eat.&rdquo

Cufone stresses that consumers can begin with a list of the 12 Worst Fish, or a &ldquoFishy Dozen&rdquo&mdashcompiled with help from experts.

Here are the 12 fish you should never eat&mdashand what to eat instead.


12 Fish You Should Never Eat (and What To Eat Instead)

This dirty dozen list is made up of the least sustainable, or even toxic, species.

It was not long ago that Americans rarely thought about where their food came from, let alone the impacts of their choices. These days it&rsquos increasingly important to know not only what you&rsquore eating and where it&rsquos come from. From food co-ops, farmers markets, and community supported agriculture (CSA), to whole aisles (and grocery stores) devoted to natural, organic, local and sustainable produce&mdashAmericans and legal protections have quickly evolved to begin averting the worst problems of industrial agriculture. So though the journey to a healthy sustainable terrestrial food system is far from over, it is well underway.

Seafood, however, is more slippery. &ldquoThat&rsquos because it&rsquos the &lsquoLast of the Buffalo Hunters,&rdquo when it comes to seafood says Joe Lasprogata, Vice President of Samuels and Son Seafood Co. &ldquoThe oceans are in some ways the last source of truly wild products, and we need to be careful with those.&rdquo Samuels and Son sponsors Sustained Seas, an organization dedicated to promoting sustainable fisheries via labeling and education. Part of the reason fisheries are in trouble is that consumers didn&rsquot know the impacts of their choices.

Lasprogata says, &ldquoFor way too long there&rsquos been this surprising attitude: Fishermen believed that fisheries belonged to them, and that has led to collapse, over and over again. There was no care, no stewardship. But fisheries can absolutely be sustainable.&rdquo That confusion has continued to spill over into consumer behavior, since some people still make fish-buying decisions based on taste, price, and texture&mdashrather than perceived sustainability, according to a recent study on British Columbian consumer habits.

But it&rsquos extremely important to think about where the fish comes from, because those factors affect not only your health, but also the future of wild fish stocks, which we and countless other species depended on for our survival. &ldquoThere are lots of ways to identify a so-called &ldquoDirty Dozen&rdquo of fish, and it&rsquos crucial to be aware of overfishing, pollution, and bycatch,&rdquo says Marianne Cufone.

Cufone is the Executive Director of Recirculating Farms Coalition, an organization dedicated to creating local land-based produce and fish systems using hydro- and aquaponics, small local systems that avoid the problems of open-water fish farms and industrial agriculture altogether, where the fish waste fertilizes fresh produce. The former Director of the Fish Program of Food and Water Watch, Cufone&rsquos mission is redirecting consumers toward healthy, sustainable fish-eating. She laughs, saying, &ldquoI get a lot of texts from my friends asking me which fish are okay to eat.&rdquo

Cufone stresses that consumers can begin with a list of the 12 Worst Fish, or a &ldquoFishy Dozen&rdquo&mdashcompiled with help from experts.

Here are the 12 fish you should never eat&mdashand what to eat instead.


12 Fish You Should Never Eat (and What To Eat Instead)

This dirty dozen list is made up of the least sustainable, or even toxic, species.

It was not long ago that Americans rarely thought about where their food came from, let alone the impacts of their choices. These days it&rsquos increasingly important to know not only what you&rsquore eating and where it&rsquos come from. From food co-ops, farmers markets, and community supported agriculture (CSA), to whole aisles (and grocery stores) devoted to natural, organic, local and sustainable produce&mdashAmericans and legal protections have quickly evolved to begin averting the worst problems of industrial agriculture. So though the journey to a healthy sustainable terrestrial food system is far from over, it is well underway.

Seafood, however, is more slippery. &ldquoThat&rsquos because it&rsquos the &lsquoLast of the Buffalo Hunters,&rdquo when it comes to seafood says Joe Lasprogata, Vice President of Samuels and Son Seafood Co. &ldquoThe oceans are in some ways the last source of truly wild products, and we need to be careful with those.&rdquo Samuels and Son sponsors Sustained Seas, an organization dedicated to promoting sustainable fisheries via labeling and education. Part of the reason fisheries are in trouble is that consumers didn&rsquot know the impacts of their choices.

Lasprogata says, &ldquoFor way too long there&rsquos been this surprising attitude: Fishermen believed that fisheries belonged to them, and that has led to collapse, over and over again. There was no care, no stewardship. But fisheries can absolutely be sustainable.&rdquo That confusion has continued to spill over into consumer behavior, since some people still make fish-buying decisions based on taste, price, and texture&mdashrather than perceived sustainability, according to a recent study on British Columbian consumer habits.

But it&rsquos extremely important to think about where the fish comes from, because those factors affect not only your health, but also the future of wild fish stocks, which we and countless other species depended on for our survival. &ldquoThere are lots of ways to identify a so-called &ldquoDirty Dozen&rdquo of fish, and it&rsquos crucial to be aware of overfishing, pollution, and bycatch,&rdquo says Marianne Cufone.

Cufone is the Executive Director of Recirculating Farms Coalition, an organization dedicated to creating local land-based produce and fish systems using hydro- and aquaponics, small local systems that avoid the problems of open-water fish farms and industrial agriculture altogether, where the fish waste fertilizes fresh produce. The former Director of the Fish Program of Food and Water Watch, Cufone&rsquos mission is redirecting consumers toward healthy, sustainable fish-eating. She laughs, saying, &ldquoI get a lot of texts from my friends asking me which fish are okay to eat.&rdquo

Cufone stresses that consumers can begin with a list of the 12 Worst Fish, or a &ldquoFishy Dozen&rdquo&mdashcompiled with help from experts.

Here are the 12 fish you should never eat&mdashand what to eat instead.


12 Fish You Should Never Eat (and What To Eat Instead)

This dirty dozen list is made up of the least sustainable, or even toxic, species.

It was not long ago that Americans rarely thought about where their food came from, let alone the impacts of their choices. These days it&rsquos increasingly important to know not only what you&rsquore eating and where it&rsquos come from. From food co-ops, farmers markets, and community supported agriculture (CSA), to whole aisles (and grocery stores) devoted to natural, organic, local and sustainable produce&mdashAmericans and legal protections have quickly evolved to begin averting the worst problems of industrial agriculture. So though the journey to a healthy sustainable terrestrial food system is far from over, it is well underway.

Seafood, however, is more slippery. &ldquoThat&rsquos because it&rsquos the &lsquoLast of the Buffalo Hunters,&rdquo when it comes to seafood says Joe Lasprogata, Vice President of Samuels and Son Seafood Co. &ldquoThe oceans are in some ways the last source of truly wild products, and we need to be careful with those.&rdquo Samuels and Son sponsors Sustained Seas, an organization dedicated to promoting sustainable fisheries via labeling and education. Part of the reason fisheries are in trouble is that consumers didn&rsquot know the impacts of their choices.

Lasprogata says, &ldquoFor way too long there&rsquos been this surprising attitude: Fishermen believed that fisheries belonged to them, and that has led to collapse, over and over again. There was no care, no stewardship. But fisheries can absolutely be sustainable.&rdquo That confusion has continued to spill over into consumer behavior, since some people still make fish-buying decisions based on taste, price, and texture&mdashrather than perceived sustainability, according to a recent study on British Columbian consumer habits.

But it&rsquos extremely important to think about where the fish comes from, because those factors affect not only your health, but also the future of wild fish stocks, which we and countless other species depended on for our survival. &ldquoThere are lots of ways to identify a so-called &ldquoDirty Dozen&rdquo of fish, and it&rsquos crucial to be aware of overfishing, pollution, and bycatch,&rdquo says Marianne Cufone.

Cufone is the Executive Director of Recirculating Farms Coalition, an organization dedicated to creating local land-based produce and fish systems using hydro- and aquaponics, small local systems that avoid the problems of open-water fish farms and industrial agriculture altogether, where the fish waste fertilizes fresh produce. The former Director of the Fish Program of Food and Water Watch, Cufone&rsquos mission is redirecting consumers toward healthy, sustainable fish-eating. She laughs, saying, &ldquoI get a lot of texts from my friends asking me which fish are okay to eat.&rdquo

Cufone stresses that consumers can begin with a list of the 12 Worst Fish, or a &ldquoFishy Dozen&rdquo&mdashcompiled with help from experts.

Here are the 12 fish you should never eat&mdashand what to eat instead.


12 Fish You Should Never Eat (and What To Eat Instead)

This dirty dozen list is made up of the least sustainable, or even toxic, species.

It was not long ago that Americans rarely thought about where their food came from, let alone the impacts of their choices. These days it&rsquos increasingly important to know not only what you&rsquore eating and where it&rsquos come from. From food co-ops, farmers markets, and community supported agriculture (CSA), to whole aisles (and grocery stores) devoted to natural, organic, local and sustainable produce&mdashAmericans and legal protections have quickly evolved to begin averting the worst problems of industrial agriculture. So though the journey to a healthy sustainable terrestrial food system is far from over, it is well underway.

Seafood, however, is more slippery. &ldquoThat&rsquos because it&rsquos the &lsquoLast of the Buffalo Hunters,&rdquo when it comes to seafood says Joe Lasprogata, Vice President of Samuels and Son Seafood Co. &ldquoThe oceans are in some ways the last source of truly wild products, and we need to be careful with those.&rdquo Samuels and Son sponsors Sustained Seas, an organization dedicated to promoting sustainable fisheries via labeling and education. Part of the reason fisheries are in trouble is that consumers didn&rsquot know the impacts of their choices.

Lasprogata says, &ldquoFor way too long there&rsquos been this surprising attitude: Fishermen believed that fisheries belonged to them, and that has led to collapse, over and over again. There was no care, no stewardship. But fisheries can absolutely be sustainable.&rdquo That confusion has continued to spill over into consumer behavior, since some people still make fish-buying decisions based on taste, price, and texture&mdashrather than perceived sustainability, according to a recent study on British Columbian consumer habits.

But it&rsquos extremely important to think about where the fish comes from, because those factors affect not only your health, but also the future of wild fish stocks, which we and countless other species depended on for our survival. &ldquoThere are lots of ways to identify a so-called &ldquoDirty Dozen&rdquo of fish, and it&rsquos crucial to be aware of overfishing, pollution, and bycatch,&rdquo says Marianne Cufone.

Cufone is the Executive Director of Recirculating Farms Coalition, an organization dedicated to creating local land-based produce and fish systems using hydro- and aquaponics, small local systems that avoid the problems of open-water fish farms and industrial agriculture altogether, where the fish waste fertilizes fresh produce. The former Director of the Fish Program of Food and Water Watch, Cufone&rsquos mission is redirecting consumers toward healthy, sustainable fish-eating. She laughs, saying, &ldquoI get a lot of texts from my friends asking me which fish are okay to eat.&rdquo

Cufone stresses that consumers can begin with a list of the 12 Worst Fish, or a &ldquoFishy Dozen&rdquo&mdashcompiled with help from experts.

Here are the 12 fish you should never eat&mdashand what to eat instead.