Traditional recipes

Tweeting About Wine

Tweeting About Wine

Totally loving this cool Maso Canali Pinot Grigio with tonight's din din of seared halibut and pesto pasta. #PairItShareIt

Tweet all about it! Yes, millions of plugged-in peeps share their innermost thoughts on just about every possible topic, 140 characters at a time, in the ever-expanding Twitterverse.

This virtual wine tasting movement is a fun way to meet up with old friends and meet new ones, especially when comparing notes about your favorite Italian Pinot Grigio, the refreshing white that pairs so well with food. That’s the premise of one tasting group you should check out, using the hashtag #PairItShareIt, which is a rolling discussion exploring great dishes to serve with food-friendly Italian Pinot Grigio. You know, pair this refreshing white and then share your perfect pairing with friends on Twitter.

Some of the most entertaining Tweets you’ll ever read are about food and wine and all sorts of combinations of those two endlessly fascinating subjects. While it’s fun to weigh in with your own Tweet-views, this insanely popular social network’s also a great way to track the palates of those you follow, whether they’re neighbors right next door or someone across the country you’ve never met.

It’s perfectly proper to pose questions, too.

Hey, wine geeks! Can anybody tell me if there's a difference between Pinot Gris and Pinot Grigio? #EnquiringMindsWantToKnow

You never know who might answer, possibly even a winemaker or a smart sommelier, who checks TweetDeck on her smart phone in between opening bottles for appreciative diners.

Super Som says: Pinot Gris and Pinot Grigio are part of the same family tree, but vary depending on region grown + winemaking traditions.

Have you ever participated in a liquid meet-up online?
No need to wait for a formal invite, just search for #PairItShareIt and then dive in to post short tasting notes on some of your favorite Italian Pinot Grigio and food pairings. Just remember, keep the discussion polite. There’s never a need to harsh somebody’s buzz and call them silly for loving whatever is in their glass. When it comes to wine: To each, his (or her) own!


Chill Out With Delicious Wine Floats

You&aposve finished dinner, just sipped the last of your wine, and are ready for dessert. But if you&aposre not quite ready to put down the glass of vino, turn it into dessert with a wine float!

What&aposs a wine float? The ingenious marriage of your favorite glass of wine and a sweet scoop of ice cream. Just like a root beer float, which combines bubbly soda with a creamy topping of vanilla or other ice cream, the beer float has made appearances on menus for years. And for the last year, wine floats have been showing up on restaurant and dessert shop menus, as well as on blogs and in my kitchen.

The Sparkling Wine Float

Carbonated beverage + ice cream is the typical success story for a float. So, Italian Prosecco, French Champagne, Spanish Cava, and American made sparkling wines are all options for the base of a wine float.

When choosing the sparkling wine for your float, think of the flavor of the ice cream you&aposd like to add before picking a flavor. If you&aposre going to go with a super-sweet ice cream, try a drier wine to balance it out.

If you want to get really flavor-forward, pair a sparkling wine packed with melon undertones with a melon sorbet, or a fruity, strawberry-forward sparkling wine with strawberry sorbet or strawberry ice cream. It sounds matchy-matchy, but tastes great.

At Shug&aposs Soda Fountain & Ice Cream in Seattle, Owner Colleen Wilkie gives customers a choice: Champagne or Prosecco as the base, and their choice of the soda shop&aposs range of ice cream and sorbet flavors. The most popular combination is a Bellini-inspired cocktail, with peach sorbet topping Prosecco. For lovers of savory flavors, Shug&aposs often pairs cucumber lime sorbet with Champagne.

Other Wine Floats

When it comes to making non-carbonated wine into a float, the key is to add your own bubbles in addition to the wine. A Spanish-inspired red wine and cola beverage made the menu at Brooklyn Winery&aposs BKW restaurant this summer, with the beverage served in a shareable pitcher made to pour over individual scoops of gelato, served to each guest.

Using seltzer is the other option, and Vine Pair suggests four varieties of wine floats to make with seltzer and your favorite wine. Just as seltzer and milk combine for a classic egg cream, the mixture of the dairy and seltzer give a frothy body, and the addition of Sauvignon Blanc (try it with a peachy ice cream), Malbec (something chocolatey would be lovely), or your other favorite wine take the float to the next level.

Ice Cream Vs. Gelato

Using sorbet instead of ice cream makes for a clean and crisp cocktail without the frothy body. The ice melts smoothly into the wine and you&aposll be left with a flavorful, sparkling beverage. With an ice cream float, you get the nostalgia of a root beer float, plus the creamy body to contrast with a sparkling beverage.

Choosing Your Glass

You can serve your float in everything from a milkshake or sundae glass, to a drinking glass, or even a bowl. At Shug&aposs, floats are served in what they call a "birdbath glass," also known as a cocktail coupe. The broad round shape and shallow bowl make for a lovely appearance, and is easy to scoop ice cream into.

You could also serve individual portions of gelato in a standard ice cream glass with the wine concoction alongside in a pitcher for self-service.


Chill Out With Delicious Wine Floats

You&aposve finished dinner, just sipped the last of your wine, and are ready for dessert. But if you&aposre not quite ready to put down the glass of vino, turn it into dessert with a wine float!

What&aposs a wine float? The ingenious marriage of your favorite glass of wine and a sweet scoop of ice cream. Just like a root beer float, which combines bubbly soda with a creamy topping of vanilla or other ice cream, the beer float has made appearances on menus for years. And for the last year, wine floats have been showing up on restaurant and dessert shop menus, as well as on blogs and in my kitchen.

The Sparkling Wine Float

Carbonated beverage + ice cream is the typical success story for a float. So, Italian Prosecco, French Champagne, Spanish Cava, and American made sparkling wines are all options for the base of a wine float.

When choosing the sparkling wine for your float, think of the flavor of the ice cream you&aposd like to add before picking a flavor. If you&aposre going to go with a super-sweet ice cream, try a drier wine to balance it out.

If you want to get really flavor-forward, pair a sparkling wine packed with melon undertones with a melon sorbet, or a fruity, strawberry-forward sparkling wine with strawberry sorbet or strawberry ice cream. It sounds matchy-matchy, but tastes great.

At Shug&aposs Soda Fountain & Ice Cream in Seattle, Owner Colleen Wilkie gives customers a choice: Champagne or Prosecco as the base, and their choice of the soda shop&aposs range of ice cream and sorbet flavors. The most popular combination is a Bellini-inspired cocktail, with peach sorbet topping Prosecco. For lovers of savory flavors, Shug&aposs often pairs cucumber lime sorbet with Champagne.

Other Wine Floats

When it comes to making non-carbonated wine into a float, the key is to add your own bubbles in addition to the wine. A Spanish-inspired red wine and cola beverage made the menu at Brooklyn Winery&aposs BKW restaurant this summer, with the beverage served in a shareable pitcher made to pour over individual scoops of gelato, served to each guest.

Using seltzer is the other option, and Vine Pair suggests four varieties of wine floats to make with seltzer and your favorite wine. Just as seltzer and milk combine for a classic egg cream, the mixture of the dairy and seltzer give a frothy body, and the addition of Sauvignon Blanc (try it with a peachy ice cream), Malbec (something chocolatey would be lovely), or your other favorite wine take the float to the next level.

Ice Cream Vs. Gelato

Using sorbet instead of ice cream makes for a clean and crisp cocktail without the frothy body. The ice melts smoothly into the wine and you&aposll be left with a flavorful, sparkling beverage. With an ice cream float, you get the nostalgia of a root beer float, plus the creamy body to contrast with a sparkling beverage.

Choosing Your Glass

You can serve your float in everything from a milkshake or sundae glass, to a drinking glass, or even a bowl. At Shug&aposs, floats are served in what they call a "birdbath glass," also known as a cocktail coupe. The broad round shape and shallow bowl make for a lovely appearance, and is easy to scoop ice cream into.

You could also serve individual portions of gelato in a standard ice cream glass with the wine concoction alongside in a pitcher for self-service.


Chill Out With Delicious Wine Floats

You&aposve finished dinner, just sipped the last of your wine, and are ready for dessert. But if you&aposre not quite ready to put down the glass of vino, turn it into dessert with a wine float!

What&aposs a wine float? The ingenious marriage of your favorite glass of wine and a sweet scoop of ice cream. Just like a root beer float, which combines bubbly soda with a creamy topping of vanilla or other ice cream, the beer float has made appearances on menus for years. And for the last year, wine floats have been showing up on restaurant and dessert shop menus, as well as on blogs and in my kitchen.

The Sparkling Wine Float

Carbonated beverage + ice cream is the typical success story for a float. So, Italian Prosecco, French Champagne, Spanish Cava, and American made sparkling wines are all options for the base of a wine float.

When choosing the sparkling wine for your float, think of the flavor of the ice cream you&aposd like to add before picking a flavor. If you&aposre going to go with a super-sweet ice cream, try a drier wine to balance it out.

If you want to get really flavor-forward, pair a sparkling wine packed with melon undertones with a melon sorbet, or a fruity, strawberry-forward sparkling wine with strawberry sorbet or strawberry ice cream. It sounds matchy-matchy, but tastes great.

At Shug&aposs Soda Fountain & Ice Cream in Seattle, Owner Colleen Wilkie gives customers a choice: Champagne or Prosecco as the base, and their choice of the soda shop&aposs range of ice cream and sorbet flavors. The most popular combination is a Bellini-inspired cocktail, with peach sorbet topping Prosecco. For lovers of savory flavors, Shug&aposs often pairs cucumber lime sorbet with Champagne.

Other Wine Floats

When it comes to making non-carbonated wine into a float, the key is to add your own bubbles in addition to the wine. A Spanish-inspired red wine and cola beverage made the menu at Brooklyn Winery&aposs BKW restaurant this summer, with the beverage served in a shareable pitcher made to pour over individual scoops of gelato, served to each guest.

Using seltzer is the other option, and Vine Pair suggests four varieties of wine floats to make with seltzer and your favorite wine. Just as seltzer and milk combine for a classic egg cream, the mixture of the dairy and seltzer give a frothy body, and the addition of Sauvignon Blanc (try it with a peachy ice cream), Malbec (something chocolatey would be lovely), or your other favorite wine take the float to the next level.

Ice Cream Vs. Gelato

Using sorbet instead of ice cream makes for a clean and crisp cocktail without the frothy body. The ice melts smoothly into the wine and you&aposll be left with a flavorful, sparkling beverage. With an ice cream float, you get the nostalgia of a root beer float, plus the creamy body to contrast with a sparkling beverage.

Choosing Your Glass

You can serve your float in everything from a milkshake or sundae glass, to a drinking glass, or even a bowl. At Shug&aposs, floats are served in what they call a "birdbath glass," also known as a cocktail coupe. The broad round shape and shallow bowl make for a lovely appearance, and is easy to scoop ice cream into.

You could also serve individual portions of gelato in a standard ice cream glass with the wine concoction alongside in a pitcher for self-service.


Chill Out With Delicious Wine Floats

You&aposve finished dinner, just sipped the last of your wine, and are ready for dessert. But if you&aposre not quite ready to put down the glass of vino, turn it into dessert with a wine float!

What&aposs a wine float? The ingenious marriage of your favorite glass of wine and a sweet scoop of ice cream. Just like a root beer float, which combines bubbly soda with a creamy topping of vanilla or other ice cream, the beer float has made appearances on menus for years. And for the last year, wine floats have been showing up on restaurant and dessert shop menus, as well as on blogs and in my kitchen.

The Sparkling Wine Float

Carbonated beverage + ice cream is the typical success story for a float. So, Italian Prosecco, French Champagne, Spanish Cava, and American made sparkling wines are all options for the base of a wine float.

When choosing the sparkling wine for your float, think of the flavor of the ice cream you&aposd like to add before picking a flavor. If you&aposre going to go with a super-sweet ice cream, try a drier wine to balance it out.

If you want to get really flavor-forward, pair a sparkling wine packed with melon undertones with a melon sorbet, or a fruity, strawberry-forward sparkling wine with strawberry sorbet or strawberry ice cream. It sounds matchy-matchy, but tastes great.

At Shug&aposs Soda Fountain & Ice Cream in Seattle, Owner Colleen Wilkie gives customers a choice: Champagne or Prosecco as the base, and their choice of the soda shop&aposs range of ice cream and sorbet flavors. The most popular combination is a Bellini-inspired cocktail, with peach sorbet topping Prosecco. For lovers of savory flavors, Shug&aposs often pairs cucumber lime sorbet with Champagne.

Other Wine Floats

When it comes to making non-carbonated wine into a float, the key is to add your own bubbles in addition to the wine. A Spanish-inspired red wine and cola beverage made the menu at Brooklyn Winery&aposs BKW restaurant this summer, with the beverage served in a shareable pitcher made to pour over individual scoops of gelato, served to each guest.

Using seltzer is the other option, and Vine Pair suggests four varieties of wine floats to make with seltzer and your favorite wine. Just as seltzer and milk combine for a classic egg cream, the mixture of the dairy and seltzer give a frothy body, and the addition of Sauvignon Blanc (try it with a peachy ice cream), Malbec (something chocolatey would be lovely), or your other favorite wine take the float to the next level.

Ice Cream Vs. Gelato

Using sorbet instead of ice cream makes for a clean and crisp cocktail without the frothy body. The ice melts smoothly into the wine and you&aposll be left with a flavorful, sparkling beverage. With an ice cream float, you get the nostalgia of a root beer float, plus the creamy body to contrast with a sparkling beverage.

Choosing Your Glass

You can serve your float in everything from a milkshake or sundae glass, to a drinking glass, or even a bowl. At Shug&aposs, floats are served in what they call a "birdbath glass," also known as a cocktail coupe. The broad round shape and shallow bowl make for a lovely appearance, and is easy to scoop ice cream into.

You could also serve individual portions of gelato in a standard ice cream glass with the wine concoction alongside in a pitcher for self-service.


Chill Out With Delicious Wine Floats

You&aposve finished dinner, just sipped the last of your wine, and are ready for dessert. But if you&aposre not quite ready to put down the glass of vino, turn it into dessert with a wine float!

What&aposs a wine float? The ingenious marriage of your favorite glass of wine and a sweet scoop of ice cream. Just like a root beer float, which combines bubbly soda with a creamy topping of vanilla or other ice cream, the beer float has made appearances on menus for years. And for the last year, wine floats have been showing up on restaurant and dessert shop menus, as well as on blogs and in my kitchen.

The Sparkling Wine Float

Carbonated beverage + ice cream is the typical success story for a float. So, Italian Prosecco, French Champagne, Spanish Cava, and American made sparkling wines are all options for the base of a wine float.

When choosing the sparkling wine for your float, think of the flavor of the ice cream you&aposd like to add before picking a flavor. If you&aposre going to go with a super-sweet ice cream, try a drier wine to balance it out.

If you want to get really flavor-forward, pair a sparkling wine packed with melon undertones with a melon sorbet, or a fruity, strawberry-forward sparkling wine with strawberry sorbet or strawberry ice cream. It sounds matchy-matchy, but tastes great.

At Shug&aposs Soda Fountain & Ice Cream in Seattle, Owner Colleen Wilkie gives customers a choice: Champagne or Prosecco as the base, and their choice of the soda shop&aposs range of ice cream and sorbet flavors. The most popular combination is a Bellini-inspired cocktail, with peach sorbet topping Prosecco. For lovers of savory flavors, Shug&aposs often pairs cucumber lime sorbet with Champagne.

Other Wine Floats

When it comes to making non-carbonated wine into a float, the key is to add your own bubbles in addition to the wine. A Spanish-inspired red wine and cola beverage made the menu at Brooklyn Winery&aposs BKW restaurant this summer, with the beverage served in a shareable pitcher made to pour over individual scoops of gelato, served to each guest.

Using seltzer is the other option, and Vine Pair suggests four varieties of wine floats to make with seltzer and your favorite wine. Just as seltzer and milk combine for a classic egg cream, the mixture of the dairy and seltzer give a frothy body, and the addition of Sauvignon Blanc (try it with a peachy ice cream), Malbec (something chocolatey would be lovely), or your other favorite wine take the float to the next level.

Ice Cream Vs. Gelato

Using sorbet instead of ice cream makes for a clean and crisp cocktail without the frothy body. The ice melts smoothly into the wine and you&aposll be left with a flavorful, sparkling beverage. With an ice cream float, you get the nostalgia of a root beer float, plus the creamy body to contrast with a sparkling beverage.

Choosing Your Glass

You can serve your float in everything from a milkshake or sundae glass, to a drinking glass, or even a bowl. At Shug&aposs, floats are served in what they call a "birdbath glass," also known as a cocktail coupe. The broad round shape and shallow bowl make for a lovely appearance, and is easy to scoop ice cream into.

You could also serve individual portions of gelato in a standard ice cream glass with the wine concoction alongside in a pitcher for self-service.


Chill Out With Delicious Wine Floats

You&aposve finished dinner, just sipped the last of your wine, and are ready for dessert. But if you&aposre not quite ready to put down the glass of vino, turn it into dessert with a wine float!

What&aposs a wine float? The ingenious marriage of your favorite glass of wine and a sweet scoop of ice cream. Just like a root beer float, which combines bubbly soda with a creamy topping of vanilla or other ice cream, the beer float has made appearances on menus for years. And for the last year, wine floats have been showing up on restaurant and dessert shop menus, as well as on blogs and in my kitchen.

The Sparkling Wine Float

Carbonated beverage + ice cream is the typical success story for a float. So, Italian Prosecco, French Champagne, Spanish Cava, and American made sparkling wines are all options for the base of a wine float.

When choosing the sparkling wine for your float, think of the flavor of the ice cream you&aposd like to add before picking a flavor. If you&aposre going to go with a super-sweet ice cream, try a drier wine to balance it out.

If you want to get really flavor-forward, pair a sparkling wine packed with melon undertones with a melon sorbet, or a fruity, strawberry-forward sparkling wine with strawberry sorbet or strawberry ice cream. It sounds matchy-matchy, but tastes great.

At Shug&aposs Soda Fountain & Ice Cream in Seattle, Owner Colleen Wilkie gives customers a choice: Champagne or Prosecco as the base, and their choice of the soda shop&aposs range of ice cream and sorbet flavors. The most popular combination is a Bellini-inspired cocktail, with peach sorbet topping Prosecco. For lovers of savory flavors, Shug&aposs often pairs cucumber lime sorbet with Champagne.

Other Wine Floats

When it comes to making non-carbonated wine into a float, the key is to add your own bubbles in addition to the wine. A Spanish-inspired red wine and cola beverage made the menu at Brooklyn Winery&aposs BKW restaurant this summer, with the beverage served in a shareable pitcher made to pour over individual scoops of gelato, served to each guest.

Using seltzer is the other option, and Vine Pair suggests four varieties of wine floats to make with seltzer and your favorite wine. Just as seltzer and milk combine for a classic egg cream, the mixture of the dairy and seltzer give a frothy body, and the addition of Sauvignon Blanc (try it with a peachy ice cream), Malbec (something chocolatey would be lovely), or your other favorite wine take the float to the next level.

Ice Cream Vs. Gelato

Using sorbet instead of ice cream makes for a clean and crisp cocktail without the frothy body. The ice melts smoothly into the wine and you&aposll be left with a flavorful, sparkling beverage. With an ice cream float, you get the nostalgia of a root beer float, plus the creamy body to contrast with a sparkling beverage.

Choosing Your Glass

You can serve your float in everything from a milkshake or sundae glass, to a drinking glass, or even a bowl. At Shug&aposs, floats are served in what they call a "birdbath glass," also known as a cocktail coupe. The broad round shape and shallow bowl make for a lovely appearance, and is easy to scoop ice cream into.

You could also serve individual portions of gelato in a standard ice cream glass with the wine concoction alongside in a pitcher for self-service.


Chill Out With Delicious Wine Floats

You&aposve finished dinner, just sipped the last of your wine, and are ready for dessert. But if you&aposre not quite ready to put down the glass of vino, turn it into dessert with a wine float!

What&aposs a wine float? The ingenious marriage of your favorite glass of wine and a sweet scoop of ice cream. Just like a root beer float, which combines bubbly soda with a creamy topping of vanilla or other ice cream, the beer float has made appearances on menus for years. And for the last year, wine floats have been showing up on restaurant and dessert shop menus, as well as on blogs and in my kitchen.

The Sparkling Wine Float

Carbonated beverage + ice cream is the typical success story for a float. So, Italian Prosecco, French Champagne, Spanish Cava, and American made sparkling wines are all options for the base of a wine float.

When choosing the sparkling wine for your float, think of the flavor of the ice cream you&aposd like to add before picking a flavor. If you&aposre going to go with a super-sweet ice cream, try a drier wine to balance it out.

If you want to get really flavor-forward, pair a sparkling wine packed with melon undertones with a melon sorbet, or a fruity, strawberry-forward sparkling wine with strawberry sorbet or strawberry ice cream. It sounds matchy-matchy, but tastes great.

At Shug&aposs Soda Fountain & Ice Cream in Seattle, Owner Colleen Wilkie gives customers a choice: Champagne or Prosecco as the base, and their choice of the soda shop&aposs range of ice cream and sorbet flavors. The most popular combination is a Bellini-inspired cocktail, with peach sorbet topping Prosecco. For lovers of savory flavors, Shug&aposs often pairs cucumber lime sorbet with Champagne.

Other Wine Floats

When it comes to making non-carbonated wine into a float, the key is to add your own bubbles in addition to the wine. A Spanish-inspired red wine and cola beverage made the menu at Brooklyn Winery&aposs BKW restaurant this summer, with the beverage served in a shareable pitcher made to pour over individual scoops of gelato, served to each guest.

Using seltzer is the other option, and Vine Pair suggests four varieties of wine floats to make with seltzer and your favorite wine. Just as seltzer and milk combine for a classic egg cream, the mixture of the dairy and seltzer give a frothy body, and the addition of Sauvignon Blanc (try it with a peachy ice cream), Malbec (something chocolatey would be lovely), or your other favorite wine take the float to the next level.

Ice Cream Vs. Gelato

Using sorbet instead of ice cream makes for a clean and crisp cocktail without the frothy body. The ice melts smoothly into the wine and you&aposll be left with a flavorful, sparkling beverage. With an ice cream float, you get the nostalgia of a root beer float, plus the creamy body to contrast with a sparkling beverage.

Choosing Your Glass

You can serve your float in everything from a milkshake or sundae glass, to a drinking glass, or even a bowl. At Shug&aposs, floats are served in what they call a "birdbath glass," also known as a cocktail coupe. The broad round shape and shallow bowl make for a lovely appearance, and is easy to scoop ice cream into.

You could also serve individual portions of gelato in a standard ice cream glass with the wine concoction alongside in a pitcher for self-service.


Chill Out With Delicious Wine Floats

You&aposve finished dinner, just sipped the last of your wine, and are ready for dessert. But if you&aposre not quite ready to put down the glass of vino, turn it into dessert with a wine float!

What&aposs a wine float? The ingenious marriage of your favorite glass of wine and a sweet scoop of ice cream. Just like a root beer float, which combines bubbly soda with a creamy topping of vanilla or other ice cream, the beer float has made appearances on menus for years. And for the last year, wine floats have been showing up on restaurant and dessert shop menus, as well as on blogs and in my kitchen.

The Sparkling Wine Float

Carbonated beverage + ice cream is the typical success story for a float. So, Italian Prosecco, French Champagne, Spanish Cava, and American made sparkling wines are all options for the base of a wine float.

When choosing the sparkling wine for your float, think of the flavor of the ice cream you&aposd like to add before picking a flavor. If you&aposre going to go with a super-sweet ice cream, try a drier wine to balance it out.

If you want to get really flavor-forward, pair a sparkling wine packed with melon undertones with a melon sorbet, or a fruity, strawberry-forward sparkling wine with strawberry sorbet or strawberry ice cream. It sounds matchy-matchy, but tastes great.

At Shug&aposs Soda Fountain & Ice Cream in Seattle, Owner Colleen Wilkie gives customers a choice: Champagne or Prosecco as the base, and their choice of the soda shop&aposs range of ice cream and sorbet flavors. The most popular combination is a Bellini-inspired cocktail, with peach sorbet topping Prosecco. For lovers of savory flavors, Shug&aposs often pairs cucumber lime sorbet with Champagne.

Other Wine Floats

When it comes to making non-carbonated wine into a float, the key is to add your own bubbles in addition to the wine. A Spanish-inspired red wine and cola beverage made the menu at Brooklyn Winery&aposs BKW restaurant this summer, with the beverage served in a shareable pitcher made to pour over individual scoops of gelato, served to each guest.

Using seltzer is the other option, and Vine Pair suggests four varieties of wine floats to make with seltzer and your favorite wine. Just as seltzer and milk combine for a classic egg cream, the mixture of the dairy and seltzer give a frothy body, and the addition of Sauvignon Blanc (try it with a peachy ice cream), Malbec (something chocolatey would be lovely), or your other favorite wine take the float to the next level.

Ice Cream Vs. Gelato

Using sorbet instead of ice cream makes for a clean and crisp cocktail without the frothy body. The ice melts smoothly into the wine and you&aposll be left with a flavorful, sparkling beverage. With an ice cream float, you get the nostalgia of a root beer float, plus the creamy body to contrast with a sparkling beverage.

Choosing Your Glass

You can serve your float in everything from a milkshake or sundae glass, to a drinking glass, or even a bowl. At Shug&aposs, floats are served in what they call a "birdbath glass," also known as a cocktail coupe. The broad round shape and shallow bowl make for a lovely appearance, and is easy to scoop ice cream into.

You could also serve individual portions of gelato in a standard ice cream glass with the wine concoction alongside in a pitcher for self-service.


Chill Out With Delicious Wine Floats

You&aposve finished dinner, just sipped the last of your wine, and are ready for dessert. But if you&aposre not quite ready to put down the glass of vino, turn it into dessert with a wine float!

What&aposs a wine float? The ingenious marriage of your favorite glass of wine and a sweet scoop of ice cream. Just like a root beer float, which combines bubbly soda with a creamy topping of vanilla or other ice cream, the beer float has made appearances on menus for years. And for the last year, wine floats have been showing up on restaurant and dessert shop menus, as well as on blogs and in my kitchen.

The Sparkling Wine Float

Carbonated beverage + ice cream is the typical success story for a float. So, Italian Prosecco, French Champagne, Spanish Cava, and American made sparkling wines are all options for the base of a wine float.

When choosing the sparkling wine for your float, think of the flavor of the ice cream you&aposd like to add before picking a flavor. If you&aposre going to go with a super-sweet ice cream, try a drier wine to balance it out.

If you want to get really flavor-forward, pair a sparkling wine packed with melon undertones with a melon sorbet, or a fruity, strawberry-forward sparkling wine with strawberry sorbet or strawberry ice cream. It sounds matchy-matchy, but tastes great.

At Shug&aposs Soda Fountain & Ice Cream in Seattle, Owner Colleen Wilkie gives customers a choice: Champagne or Prosecco as the base, and their choice of the soda shop&aposs range of ice cream and sorbet flavors. The most popular combination is a Bellini-inspired cocktail, with peach sorbet topping Prosecco. For lovers of savory flavors, Shug&aposs often pairs cucumber lime sorbet with Champagne.

Other Wine Floats

When it comes to making non-carbonated wine into a float, the key is to add your own bubbles in addition to the wine. A Spanish-inspired red wine and cola beverage made the menu at Brooklyn Winery&aposs BKW restaurant this summer, with the beverage served in a shareable pitcher made to pour over individual scoops of gelato, served to each guest.

Using seltzer is the other option, and Vine Pair suggests four varieties of wine floats to make with seltzer and your favorite wine. Just as seltzer and milk combine for a classic egg cream, the mixture of the dairy and seltzer give a frothy body, and the addition of Sauvignon Blanc (try it with a peachy ice cream), Malbec (something chocolatey would be lovely), or your other favorite wine take the float to the next level.

Ice Cream Vs. Gelato

Using sorbet instead of ice cream makes for a clean and crisp cocktail without the frothy body. The ice melts smoothly into the wine and you&aposll be left with a flavorful, sparkling beverage. With an ice cream float, you get the nostalgia of a root beer float, plus the creamy body to contrast with a sparkling beverage.

Choosing Your Glass

You can serve your float in everything from a milkshake or sundae glass, to a drinking glass, or even a bowl. At Shug&aposs, floats are served in what they call a "birdbath glass," also known as a cocktail coupe. The broad round shape and shallow bowl make for a lovely appearance, and is easy to scoop ice cream into.

You could also serve individual portions of gelato in a standard ice cream glass with the wine concoction alongside in a pitcher for self-service.


Chill Out With Delicious Wine Floats

You&aposve finished dinner, just sipped the last of your wine, and are ready for dessert. But if you&aposre not quite ready to put down the glass of vino, turn it into dessert with a wine float!

What&aposs a wine float? The ingenious marriage of your favorite glass of wine and a sweet scoop of ice cream. Just like a root beer float, which combines bubbly soda with a creamy topping of vanilla or other ice cream, the beer float has made appearances on menus for years. And for the last year, wine floats have been showing up on restaurant and dessert shop menus, as well as on blogs and in my kitchen.

The Sparkling Wine Float

Carbonated beverage + ice cream is the typical success story for a float. So, Italian Prosecco, French Champagne, Spanish Cava, and American made sparkling wines are all options for the base of a wine float.

When choosing the sparkling wine for your float, think of the flavor of the ice cream you&aposd like to add before picking a flavor. If you&aposre going to go with a super-sweet ice cream, try a drier wine to balance it out.

If you want to get really flavor-forward, pair a sparkling wine packed with melon undertones with a melon sorbet, or a fruity, strawberry-forward sparkling wine with strawberry sorbet or strawberry ice cream. It sounds matchy-matchy, but tastes great.

At Shug&aposs Soda Fountain & Ice Cream in Seattle, Owner Colleen Wilkie gives customers a choice: Champagne or Prosecco as the base, and their choice of the soda shop&aposs range of ice cream and sorbet flavors. The most popular combination is a Bellini-inspired cocktail, with peach sorbet topping Prosecco. For lovers of savory flavors, Shug&aposs often pairs cucumber lime sorbet with Champagne.

Other Wine Floats

When it comes to making non-carbonated wine into a float, the key is to add your own bubbles in addition to the wine. A Spanish-inspired red wine and cola beverage made the menu at Brooklyn Winery&aposs BKW restaurant this summer, with the beverage served in a shareable pitcher made to pour over individual scoops of gelato, served to each guest.

Using seltzer is the other option, and Vine Pair suggests four varieties of wine floats to make with seltzer and your favorite wine. Just as seltzer and milk combine for a classic egg cream, the mixture of the dairy and seltzer give a frothy body, and the addition of Sauvignon Blanc (try it with a peachy ice cream), Malbec (something chocolatey would be lovely), or your other favorite wine take the float to the next level.

Ice Cream Vs. Gelato

Using sorbet instead of ice cream makes for a clean and crisp cocktail without the frothy body. The ice melts smoothly into the wine and you&aposll be left with a flavorful, sparkling beverage. With an ice cream float, you get the nostalgia of a root beer float, plus the creamy body to contrast with a sparkling beverage.

Choosing Your Glass

You can serve your float in everything from a milkshake or sundae glass, to a drinking glass, or even a bowl. At Shug&aposs, floats are served in what they call a "birdbath glass," also known as a cocktail coupe. The broad round shape and shallow bowl make for a lovely appearance, and is easy to scoop ice cream into.

You could also serve individual portions of gelato in a standard ice cream glass with the wine concoction alongside in a pitcher for self-service.


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