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9 Muscle-Building Bedtime Snacks

9 Muscle-Building Bedtime Snacks

Help fuel your muscles through the night with these protein-rich snacks

9 Muscle-Building Bedtime Snacks

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Pairing a protein-rich food with a healthy fat can help to slow down digestion, providing your body with vital nutrients throughout the night. Sure, many people advocate that nutrient timing is completely irrelevant, but, for those who do believe, click ahead to see some of the best muscle-building bed time snacks.

Almond Butter

Canned Tuna

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Making a meal doesn’t get any easier than cracking open a can of tuna. While it’s important to consider mercury levels in any fish you eat, the protein content of canned tuna is rich enough to fuel any active person’s muscles before bed.

To add some healthy fats to your tuna, stir in olive oil.

Casein Powder

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Casein is a type of protein that is released slowly to the body. This means that your body will reap the benefits of steadily receiving amino acids while you sleep.

To add some healthy fats to your casein shake, mix in coconut oil.

Cheese

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There are plenty of types of cheese, but some are healthier than others. While you may wish to steer clear of low-fat cheeses, everyone has different interests in terms of which cheese he or she is comfortable eating. With full-fat and low-fat options, though, you’ll find a rich source of protein regardless of fat levels.

Take advantage of cheese’s lack of carbs by eating it with low-carb green vegetables before bed.

Cottage Cheese

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A great food to eat at any time of the day, cottage cheese is the quintessential muscle-building nighttime food. Rich in casein, cottage cheese slowly releases protein to your body throughout the night. Fat-free varieties have more carbs than their full-fat cousins, allowing you to meet your macronutrient needs in more way than one.

For more on cottage cheese recipes, click here.

Greek Yogurt

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Greek yogurt is both protein- and calcium-rich. When paired with a healthy fat source like flax seeds, this bedtime snack’s nutritional profile is perfect for repairing torn muscle fibers all night long.

Tired of Greek yogurt? Try another type of yogurt.

Milk

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If you haven’t noticed, dairy products are staple pre-bed muscle-builders. Unfortunately for those who stay away from cow’s milk, dairy products are the best natural source of slow-digesting casein. A glass of whole milk combines casein with fats, creating the ultimate slow-digesting protein scenario for bedtime.

Peanut Butter

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Many people look to nut butters, including peanut butter, as a great source of protein. Yes, peanut butter does contain protein, but this food in its natural form contains more healthy fat than anything else. These fats, mixed with peanut butter’s protein, are digested slowly by the body, allowing your muscles to tap into it for fuel while you sleep.

For more on peanut butter recipes, click here.

Salmon

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Many people’s diets lack omega-3 fatty acids. Salmon is incredibly rich in both protein and the heart- and brain-friendly omega-3s. A piece of salmon cooked in olive oil is a great meal to have before bed for muscle-conscious diners looking for more of a meal than a snack.


The 10 Best and Worst Bedtime Snacks

If hunger strikes late in the day, choose wisely. Here, dietitians share the foods to reach for and the ones to avoid if you want to fall (and stay!) asleep.

Fried foods, nuts, and fruit: Which options are smart to eat in the evening and at night?

Who doesn’t love putting up their feet and tucking in to a bowl of popcorn or ice cream at the end of a long day?

While the occasional bedtime snack is fine, capping off every day with sweet or salty fare may spell trouble. “Snacking later into the night increases the chance of weight gain, obesity, and cardiometabolic diseases,” says Kristin Kirkpatrick, RD, a registered dietitian and the manager of Wellness Nutrition Services at Cleveland Clinic Wellness and Preventive Medicine in Ohio.

Many of us are more likely to reach for less-than-healthy foods in the evening, and you can blame your body’s built-in survival mechanisms for this. Research has shown that our circadian rhythms (the body’s internal processes that follow a 24-hour cycle) raise our hunger and cravings for sweet, salty, and carbohydrate-heavy foods in the evenings.

Researchers speculate that a desire to eat high-calorie foods at night helped our ancestors survive when food was scarce. But in today’s world, late-night cravings can add unnecessary calories that lead to significant weight gain if left unchecked.

“To offset these innate cravings, I have found that your first defense should be drinking a glass of water or [caffeine-free] tea, rather than heading to the snack pantry,” Kirkpatrick says.

Ideally, you’ll stop eating two to three hours before going to bed. If you’re actually hungry and you need a snack to dip into slumber, chances are you’re not eating enough during the day, Kirkpatrick says. Still, if you do need to eat, or you crave a quick bite before bed, “it is important to choose a small, low-calorie, nutrient-dense snack at this time of the day,” Kirkpatrick says.

What’s more, some snacks contain nutrients that may relax your body, helping you fall and stay asleep.

Read on to discover the best bedtime snacks, as well as the snacks to avoid.


The 10 Best and Worst Bedtime Snacks

If hunger strikes late in the day, choose wisely. Here, dietitians share the foods to reach for and the ones to avoid if you want to fall (and stay!) asleep.

Fried foods, nuts, and fruit: Which options are smart to eat in the evening and at night?

Who doesn’t love putting up their feet and tucking in to a bowl of popcorn or ice cream at the end of a long day?

While the occasional bedtime snack is fine, capping off every day with sweet or salty fare may spell trouble. “Snacking later into the night increases the chance of weight gain, obesity, and cardiometabolic diseases,” says Kristin Kirkpatrick, RD, a registered dietitian and the manager of Wellness Nutrition Services at Cleveland Clinic Wellness and Preventive Medicine in Ohio.

Many of us are more likely to reach for less-than-healthy foods in the evening, and you can blame your body’s built-in survival mechanisms for this. Research has shown that our circadian rhythms (the body’s internal processes that follow a 24-hour cycle) raise our hunger and cravings for sweet, salty, and carbohydrate-heavy foods in the evenings.

Researchers speculate that a desire to eat high-calorie foods at night helped our ancestors survive when food was scarce. But in today’s world, late-night cravings can add unnecessary calories that lead to significant weight gain if left unchecked.

“To offset these innate cravings, I have found that your first defense should be drinking a glass of water or [caffeine-free] tea, rather than heading to the snack pantry,” Kirkpatrick says.

Ideally, you’ll stop eating two to three hours before going to bed. If you’re actually hungry and you need a snack to dip into slumber, chances are you’re not eating enough during the day, Kirkpatrick says. Still, if you do need to eat, or you crave a quick bite before bed, “it is important to choose a small, low-calorie, nutrient-dense snack at this time of the day,” Kirkpatrick says.

What’s more, some snacks contain nutrients that may relax your body, helping you fall and stay asleep.

Read on to discover the best bedtime snacks, as well as the snacks to avoid.


The 10 Best and Worst Bedtime Snacks

If hunger strikes late in the day, choose wisely. Here, dietitians share the foods to reach for and the ones to avoid if you want to fall (and stay!) asleep.

Fried foods, nuts, and fruit: Which options are smart to eat in the evening and at night?

Who doesn’t love putting up their feet and tucking in to a bowl of popcorn or ice cream at the end of a long day?

While the occasional bedtime snack is fine, capping off every day with sweet or salty fare may spell trouble. “Snacking later into the night increases the chance of weight gain, obesity, and cardiometabolic diseases,” says Kristin Kirkpatrick, RD, a registered dietitian and the manager of Wellness Nutrition Services at Cleveland Clinic Wellness and Preventive Medicine in Ohio.

Many of us are more likely to reach for less-than-healthy foods in the evening, and you can blame your body’s built-in survival mechanisms for this. Research has shown that our circadian rhythms (the body’s internal processes that follow a 24-hour cycle) raise our hunger and cravings for sweet, salty, and carbohydrate-heavy foods in the evenings.

Researchers speculate that a desire to eat high-calorie foods at night helped our ancestors survive when food was scarce. But in today’s world, late-night cravings can add unnecessary calories that lead to significant weight gain if left unchecked.

“To offset these innate cravings, I have found that your first defense should be drinking a glass of water or [caffeine-free] tea, rather than heading to the snack pantry,” Kirkpatrick says.

Ideally, you’ll stop eating two to three hours before going to bed. If you’re actually hungry and you need a snack to dip into slumber, chances are you’re not eating enough during the day, Kirkpatrick says. Still, if you do need to eat, or you crave a quick bite before bed, “it is important to choose a small, low-calorie, nutrient-dense snack at this time of the day,” Kirkpatrick says.

What’s more, some snacks contain nutrients that may relax your body, helping you fall and stay asleep.

Read on to discover the best bedtime snacks, as well as the snacks to avoid.


The 10 Best and Worst Bedtime Snacks

If hunger strikes late in the day, choose wisely. Here, dietitians share the foods to reach for and the ones to avoid if you want to fall (and stay!) asleep.

Fried foods, nuts, and fruit: Which options are smart to eat in the evening and at night?

Who doesn’t love putting up their feet and tucking in to a bowl of popcorn or ice cream at the end of a long day?

While the occasional bedtime snack is fine, capping off every day with sweet or salty fare may spell trouble. “Snacking later into the night increases the chance of weight gain, obesity, and cardiometabolic diseases,” says Kristin Kirkpatrick, RD, a registered dietitian and the manager of Wellness Nutrition Services at Cleveland Clinic Wellness and Preventive Medicine in Ohio.

Many of us are more likely to reach for less-than-healthy foods in the evening, and you can blame your body’s built-in survival mechanisms for this. Research has shown that our circadian rhythms (the body’s internal processes that follow a 24-hour cycle) raise our hunger and cravings for sweet, salty, and carbohydrate-heavy foods in the evenings.

Researchers speculate that a desire to eat high-calorie foods at night helped our ancestors survive when food was scarce. But in today’s world, late-night cravings can add unnecessary calories that lead to significant weight gain if left unchecked.

“To offset these innate cravings, I have found that your first defense should be drinking a glass of water or [caffeine-free] tea, rather than heading to the snack pantry,” Kirkpatrick says.

Ideally, you’ll stop eating two to three hours before going to bed. If you’re actually hungry and you need a snack to dip into slumber, chances are you’re not eating enough during the day, Kirkpatrick says. Still, if you do need to eat, or you crave a quick bite before bed, “it is important to choose a small, low-calorie, nutrient-dense snack at this time of the day,” Kirkpatrick says.

What’s more, some snacks contain nutrients that may relax your body, helping you fall and stay asleep.

Read on to discover the best bedtime snacks, as well as the snacks to avoid.


The 10 Best and Worst Bedtime Snacks

If hunger strikes late in the day, choose wisely. Here, dietitians share the foods to reach for and the ones to avoid if you want to fall (and stay!) asleep.

Fried foods, nuts, and fruit: Which options are smart to eat in the evening and at night?

Who doesn’t love putting up their feet and tucking in to a bowl of popcorn or ice cream at the end of a long day?

While the occasional bedtime snack is fine, capping off every day with sweet or salty fare may spell trouble. “Snacking later into the night increases the chance of weight gain, obesity, and cardiometabolic diseases,” says Kristin Kirkpatrick, RD, a registered dietitian and the manager of Wellness Nutrition Services at Cleveland Clinic Wellness and Preventive Medicine in Ohio.

Many of us are more likely to reach for less-than-healthy foods in the evening, and you can blame your body’s built-in survival mechanisms for this. Research has shown that our circadian rhythms (the body’s internal processes that follow a 24-hour cycle) raise our hunger and cravings for sweet, salty, and carbohydrate-heavy foods in the evenings.

Researchers speculate that a desire to eat high-calorie foods at night helped our ancestors survive when food was scarce. But in today’s world, late-night cravings can add unnecessary calories that lead to significant weight gain if left unchecked.

“To offset these innate cravings, I have found that your first defense should be drinking a glass of water or [caffeine-free] tea, rather than heading to the snack pantry,” Kirkpatrick says.

Ideally, you’ll stop eating two to three hours before going to bed. If you’re actually hungry and you need a snack to dip into slumber, chances are you’re not eating enough during the day, Kirkpatrick says. Still, if you do need to eat, or you crave a quick bite before bed, “it is important to choose a small, low-calorie, nutrient-dense snack at this time of the day,” Kirkpatrick says.

What’s more, some snacks contain nutrients that may relax your body, helping you fall and stay asleep.

Read on to discover the best bedtime snacks, as well as the snacks to avoid.


The 10 Best and Worst Bedtime Snacks

If hunger strikes late in the day, choose wisely. Here, dietitians share the foods to reach for and the ones to avoid if you want to fall (and stay!) asleep.

Fried foods, nuts, and fruit: Which options are smart to eat in the evening and at night?

Who doesn’t love putting up their feet and tucking in to a bowl of popcorn or ice cream at the end of a long day?

While the occasional bedtime snack is fine, capping off every day with sweet or salty fare may spell trouble. “Snacking later into the night increases the chance of weight gain, obesity, and cardiometabolic diseases,” says Kristin Kirkpatrick, RD, a registered dietitian and the manager of Wellness Nutrition Services at Cleveland Clinic Wellness and Preventive Medicine in Ohio.

Many of us are more likely to reach for less-than-healthy foods in the evening, and you can blame your body’s built-in survival mechanisms for this. Research has shown that our circadian rhythms (the body’s internal processes that follow a 24-hour cycle) raise our hunger and cravings for sweet, salty, and carbohydrate-heavy foods in the evenings.

Researchers speculate that a desire to eat high-calorie foods at night helped our ancestors survive when food was scarce. But in today’s world, late-night cravings can add unnecessary calories that lead to significant weight gain if left unchecked.

“To offset these innate cravings, I have found that your first defense should be drinking a glass of water or [caffeine-free] tea, rather than heading to the snack pantry,” Kirkpatrick says.

Ideally, you’ll stop eating two to three hours before going to bed. If you’re actually hungry and you need a snack to dip into slumber, chances are you’re not eating enough during the day, Kirkpatrick says. Still, if you do need to eat, or you crave a quick bite before bed, “it is important to choose a small, low-calorie, nutrient-dense snack at this time of the day,” Kirkpatrick says.

What’s more, some snacks contain nutrients that may relax your body, helping you fall and stay asleep.

Read on to discover the best bedtime snacks, as well as the snacks to avoid.


The 10 Best and Worst Bedtime Snacks

If hunger strikes late in the day, choose wisely. Here, dietitians share the foods to reach for and the ones to avoid if you want to fall (and stay!) asleep.

Fried foods, nuts, and fruit: Which options are smart to eat in the evening and at night?

Who doesn’t love putting up their feet and tucking in to a bowl of popcorn or ice cream at the end of a long day?

While the occasional bedtime snack is fine, capping off every day with sweet or salty fare may spell trouble. “Snacking later into the night increases the chance of weight gain, obesity, and cardiometabolic diseases,” says Kristin Kirkpatrick, RD, a registered dietitian and the manager of Wellness Nutrition Services at Cleveland Clinic Wellness and Preventive Medicine in Ohio.

Many of us are more likely to reach for less-than-healthy foods in the evening, and you can blame your body’s built-in survival mechanisms for this. Research has shown that our circadian rhythms (the body’s internal processes that follow a 24-hour cycle) raise our hunger and cravings for sweet, salty, and carbohydrate-heavy foods in the evenings.

Researchers speculate that a desire to eat high-calorie foods at night helped our ancestors survive when food was scarce. But in today’s world, late-night cravings can add unnecessary calories that lead to significant weight gain if left unchecked.

“To offset these innate cravings, I have found that your first defense should be drinking a glass of water or [caffeine-free] tea, rather than heading to the snack pantry,” Kirkpatrick says.

Ideally, you’ll stop eating two to three hours before going to bed. If you’re actually hungry and you need a snack to dip into slumber, chances are you’re not eating enough during the day, Kirkpatrick says. Still, if you do need to eat, or you crave a quick bite before bed, “it is important to choose a small, low-calorie, nutrient-dense snack at this time of the day,” Kirkpatrick says.

What’s more, some snacks contain nutrients that may relax your body, helping you fall and stay asleep.

Read on to discover the best bedtime snacks, as well as the snacks to avoid.


The 10 Best and Worst Bedtime Snacks

If hunger strikes late in the day, choose wisely. Here, dietitians share the foods to reach for and the ones to avoid if you want to fall (and stay!) asleep.

Fried foods, nuts, and fruit: Which options are smart to eat in the evening and at night?

Who doesn’t love putting up their feet and tucking in to a bowl of popcorn or ice cream at the end of a long day?

While the occasional bedtime snack is fine, capping off every day with sweet or salty fare may spell trouble. “Snacking later into the night increases the chance of weight gain, obesity, and cardiometabolic diseases,” says Kristin Kirkpatrick, RD, a registered dietitian and the manager of Wellness Nutrition Services at Cleveland Clinic Wellness and Preventive Medicine in Ohio.

Many of us are more likely to reach for less-than-healthy foods in the evening, and you can blame your body’s built-in survival mechanisms for this. Research has shown that our circadian rhythms (the body’s internal processes that follow a 24-hour cycle) raise our hunger and cravings for sweet, salty, and carbohydrate-heavy foods in the evenings.

Researchers speculate that a desire to eat high-calorie foods at night helped our ancestors survive when food was scarce. But in today’s world, late-night cravings can add unnecessary calories that lead to significant weight gain if left unchecked.

“To offset these innate cravings, I have found that your first defense should be drinking a glass of water or [caffeine-free] tea, rather than heading to the snack pantry,” Kirkpatrick says.

Ideally, you’ll stop eating two to three hours before going to bed. If you’re actually hungry and you need a snack to dip into slumber, chances are you’re not eating enough during the day, Kirkpatrick says. Still, if you do need to eat, or you crave a quick bite before bed, “it is important to choose a small, low-calorie, nutrient-dense snack at this time of the day,” Kirkpatrick says.

What’s more, some snacks contain nutrients that may relax your body, helping you fall and stay asleep.

Read on to discover the best bedtime snacks, as well as the snacks to avoid.


The 10 Best and Worst Bedtime Snacks

If hunger strikes late in the day, choose wisely. Here, dietitians share the foods to reach for and the ones to avoid if you want to fall (and stay!) asleep.

Fried foods, nuts, and fruit: Which options are smart to eat in the evening and at night?

Who doesn’t love putting up their feet and tucking in to a bowl of popcorn or ice cream at the end of a long day?

While the occasional bedtime snack is fine, capping off every day with sweet or salty fare may spell trouble. “Snacking later into the night increases the chance of weight gain, obesity, and cardiometabolic diseases,” says Kristin Kirkpatrick, RD, a registered dietitian and the manager of Wellness Nutrition Services at Cleveland Clinic Wellness and Preventive Medicine in Ohio.

Many of us are more likely to reach for less-than-healthy foods in the evening, and you can blame your body’s built-in survival mechanisms for this. Research has shown that our circadian rhythms (the body’s internal processes that follow a 24-hour cycle) raise our hunger and cravings for sweet, salty, and carbohydrate-heavy foods in the evenings.

Researchers speculate that a desire to eat high-calorie foods at night helped our ancestors survive when food was scarce. But in today’s world, late-night cravings can add unnecessary calories that lead to significant weight gain if left unchecked.

“To offset these innate cravings, I have found that your first defense should be drinking a glass of water or [caffeine-free] tea, rather than heading to the snack pantry,” Kirkpatrick says.

Ideally, you’ll stop eating two to three hours before going to bed. If you’re actually hungry and you need a snack to dip into slumber, chances are you’re not eating enough during the day, Kirkpatrick says. Still, if you do need to eat, or you crave a quick bite before bed, “it is important to choose a small, low-calorie, nutrient-dense snack at this time of the day,” Kirkpatrick says.

What’s more, some snacks contain nutrients that may relax your body, helping you fall and stay asleep.

Read on to discover the best bedtime snacks, as well as the snacks to avoid.


The 10 Best and Worst Bedtime Snacks

If hunger strikes late in the day, choose wisely. Here, dietitians share the foods to reach for and the ones to avoid if you want to fall (and stay!) asleep.

Fried foods, nuts, and fruit: Which options are smart to eat in the evening and at night?

Who doesn’t love putting up their feet and tucking in to a bowl of popcorn or ice cream at the end of a long day?

While the occasional bedtime snack is fine, capping off every day with sweet or salty fare may spell trouble. “Snacking later into the night increases the chance of weight gain, obesity, and cardiometabolic diseases,” says Kristin Kirkpatrick, RD, a registered dietitian and the manager of Wellness Nutrition Services at Cleveland Clinic Wellness and Preventive Medicine in Ohio.

Many of us are more likely to reach for less-than-healthy foods in the evening, and you can blame your body’s built-in survival mechanisms for this. Research has shown that our circadian rhythms (the body’s internal processes that follow a 24-hour cycle) raise our hunger and cravings for sweet, salty, and carbohydrate-heavy foods in the evenings.

Researchers speculate that a desire to eat high-calorie foods at night helped our ancestors survive when food was scarce. But in today’s world, late-night cravings can add unnecessary calories that lead to significant weight gain if left unchecked.

“To offset these innate cravings, I have found that your first defense should be drinking a glass of water or [caffeine-free] tea, rather than heading to the snack pantry,” Kirkpatrick says.

Ideally, you’ll stop eating two to three hours before going to bed. If you’re actually hungry and you need a snack to dip into slumber, chances are you’re not eating enough during the day, Kirkpatrick says. Still, if you do need to eat, or you crave a quick bite before bed, “it is important to choose a small, low-calorie, nutrient-dense snack at this time of the day,” Kirkpatrick says.

What’s more, some snacks contain nutrients that may relax your body, helping you fall and stay asleep.

Read on to discover the best bedtime snacks, as well as the snacks to avoid.