Traditional recipes

Vitamin C Brew

Vitamin C Brew

Makes 1 Servings

“Tastes like a boozy Orangina; I could drink ’em all day long.” –Claire Saffitz, assistant food editor

July 2014

Ingredients

  • 2 oz. fresh orange juice

  • 1 oz. gin

  • American-style lager (such as Miller High Life)

  • Orange wheel (for serving)

Recipe Preparation

  • Combine orange juice and gin in a pint glass filled with ice. Top off with beer. Garnish with orange wheel.

Recipe by Bon Appétit

,

Photos by Danny Kim

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Flavored Iced Tea Recipes

Iced tea recipes with fruit offer a sugar-free sweetness. Plus, when paired with tart green tea, the flavors complement one another. With the addition of cinnamon, your metabolism will get a boost as well! You will only need four ingredients for this recipe that are likely already in your kitchen!

  • 8-10 Ounces Water
  • 1 Green Tea K-Cup® pod
  • 1 Cinnamon Sticks
  • 1/4 Apple, sliced
  1. Brew your green tea K-Cup® pod on the eight or ten-ounce water setting of your Keurig® machine.
  2. Add the cinnamon sticks, and slices of apple to the water.
  3. Cover the tea, leaving the apple and cinnamon inside.
  4. Place in the fridge for an hour. After the hour, remove the apple and cinnamon sticks.
  5. Add ice and sugar if desired and enjoy!

Recipe Summary

  • 1 (.25 ounce) package active dry yeast
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 1 (12 fluid ounce) can frozen juice concentrate - any flavor except citrus, thawed
  • 3 ½ quarts cold water, or as needed

Combine the yeast, sugar and juice concentrate in a gallon jug. Fill the jug the rest of the way with cold water. Rinse out a large balloon, and fit it over the opening of the jug. Secure the balloon with a rubber band.

Place jug in a cool dark place. Within a day you will notice the balloon starting to expand. As the sugar turns to alcohol the gasses released will fill up the balloon. When the balloon is deflated back to size the wine is ready to drink. It takes about 6 weeks total.

Use a frozen juice concentrate without added sweeteners for best results.


Cold Brew Vitamin C Smoothie

If you don’t have time for both coffee and breakfast, why not blend them both together in a smoothie? Spicy and rich, this recipe contains sweet potato, a source of antioxidant vitamin C. This blend is perfect for cooler spring mornings or when you want a new, easy way to add Vitamin C to your diet (or both!).

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup unsweetened plant-based beverage
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cold brewed coffee
  • 1/3 cup cooked sweet potato flesh (from about 1/2 of a small, roasted sweet potato)
  • 1 frozen banana
  • 1/2 scoop French Vanilla Vega One® Organic All-in-One Shake
  • or 1/2 scoop Vanilla Vega® Essentials
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp ground ginger
  • freshly grated nutmeg, to taste
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla extract or ground vanilla
  • Small handful of ice

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a blender and blend on high until completely smooth and frothy (about 1 minute).


Vitamin C | Prevention and Treatment of Constipation

As some of you may know from my page about laxatives, I’m big believer that any kind of marketed laxative promotes a vicious cycle of reoccurring constipation. However I also understand that people need a little extra help sometimes, but there is a more gentle approach to speeding up your digestive tract and one way to combat it is through nutrition and vitamins C.

People usually associate Vitamin C with oranges and are mostly taken when they have a cold or flu, but truth be told, vitamin C has many other overlooked benefits (which I’ll go into in another post). Other than building collagen in the body or being one of the most mighty antioxidants known in nature, today I want to talk about the effects of Vitamin C and it’s treatment for constipation.

What is the Recommended Daily Intake (RDI)?

It is one of the most widely taken vitamin product anywhere in the world, yet many people are deficient in vitamin C today, the RDI for vitmanin C:

Keep in mind these RDI’s are the minimum a human should have and is enough to keep the common cold at bay, but like I always say, different people call for different needs and some people require more of something than others. Vitamin C is a water soluble vitamin, which means that if your body has excess of the vitamin you will pee it out. Taking vitamin C in high doses results in a laxative effect, it also has no toxicity rating, which means it safe to take in high doses at any one time (you may experience nausea, stomach cramps or diarrhoea) and should be taken at various times in the day for slow release and optimum absorption.

How much should I take to treat Constipation?

For myself I take a minimum of 500mg per day after breakfast, to keep up with my natural rhythm and if I need a little extra help I take anywhere from 1000mg to 2000mg over a period of 3 hours (mild constipation). For severe constipation you can take up to 4000mg as follows:

2000mg before bed

2000mg in the morning

2000mg noon (this puts you at 6000mg)

*Remember to drink lots of water throughout too.

**For women who suffer with constipation around their menstruation they can adjust their intake accordingly.

How does it work?

Your body is pretty smart, it knows what it wants and if it doesn’t need any more you can just pee it out. Vitamin C is not stored in the body so the excess will sit in the gut unabsorbed resulting in a laxative effect. This is a much more gentle approach to treat constipation short term as opposed to stimulant laxatives which force the body into action (mostly like a bully at school, who wants you out of his side of the playground) )

Remember this is not a long term solution, and if you continue to suffer with chronic constipation consult your Doctor to find the cause of your constipation.


Preconception meal plan

You can buy dried herbs from places such as Neal’s Yard, who use the best quality, organic herbs.

To make the tea mix, combine all the following ingredients and store in an airtight container.

1 part red raspberry leaf

To make a tea, prepare as an infusion.

Put 1 heaped tablespoon of herb mixture into a teapot, pour over 1 pint of boiling water and allow it to steep for 45 minutes before drinking. Drink one brew a day.

Poached Egg, griddled cherry toms + avocado on toast

This is a gorgeous quick & easy breakfast packed full of important fertility nutrients such as zinc from pumpkin seeds, choline & selenium from eggs and vitamin E & fatty acids from the avocado. Feel free to swap out the toast or replace with a gluten free variety if you prefer. Or to make it vegan, drop the eggs!

12 x Cherry tomatoes (on the vine)

Turn grill on to high heat.

Start by scooping out the avocado flesh, discarding the pip & skins and place in a bowl. Mash with a fork, or potato masher. Squeeze approx 1 tbsp (or add more to taste) of lemon juice onto the avocado, season with chilli flakes, salt and pepper, mix to combine, (you should have a fairly smooth paste).

Meanwhile, bring a small saucepan of water to the boil turn the heat down until just simmering. Before you cook your eggs, prepare your tomatoes. Place your tomatoes onto a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, season with salt and pepper, and place underneath the grill for up to 5 minutes.

Add a dash of vinegar to the pan (any vinegar will do, this helps to keep the whites from breaking up too much), crack your eggs into a small cups, ready to pour into the water, swirl the water round with a spoon to create a whirlpool, then add your eggs one at a time, to the pan.

Cook for 2 minutes in the pan, then remove pan from heat and leave in water for another 4 minutes.

Now you have time to toast your rye bread, place on a plate and spoon equal amounts of avocado onto each piece. Remove eggs from water using a slotted spoon, patting each egg dry on kitchen towel and place on top of your avocado toast.

Remove your perfectly griddled tomatoes on top, finishing with a final dash of black pepper, sprinkle over some pumpkin seeds and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.

Make it vegan: swap the eggs for some hemp seeds sprinkled on top of the avocado

Smashed avocado, flaked tuna & griddled sweet potato slices

This little power lunch is perfect for preconception. Packed with aphrodisiacs, and important fertility nutrients such as vitamin E, B vitamins, Selenium, Magnesium, Vitamin C and Iron helping to contribute to good egg and sperm health.

2 tbsp plain live yoghurt (dairy or soya)

A few sprigs of dill, or a variation of herbs (parsley, basil, tarragon) finely chopped

Fresh or dried Chilies - optional

Turn on the grill, wash the sweet potato, leaving the skin on, cut sweet potato into (1/2 cm) thick vertical slices, brush with small amount of extra virgin olive oil and season with salt & pepper, and place on a baking sheet, under the grill, for approx 5-8 minutes. Turning over half way through cooking, until browned on both sides and soft to touch.

Open your tin of tuna and drain the meat in a sieve, discarding any excess water. In a bowl mix together the tuna with the yoghurt, lemon juice, chopped herbs, salt, pepper, chili & a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, until well combined.

In a bowl, prepare your salad leaves, (wash if necessary & dry thoroughly) finely chop the spinach leaves (leaving some whole if you prefer), deseed the red pepper and slice into thin slithers, scoop out the avocado flesh discarding the pip & skins and cut into cubes, mix together.

Once the sweet potato is cooked, remove from grill and arrange on your plate. Layering each slice with the tuna salad, finally spooning the salad to the side and sprinkle with some fennel seeds.

Make it Vegan: swap the tuna for plain hummus.

Almond & Super Veggie Pizza

Gut health plays a very important role in overall health, and especially fertility! A healthy gut will help the body in essential hormone production and optimal nutrient absorption. The artichoke, onion and garlic in this recipe all help contribute to a healthy gut biome. This recipe is also packed with vitamin E, B12, vitamin A and selenium, all essential nutrients for fertility and preparing the body for conception.

1 tsp dried Italian mixed herbs (or make up your own mix of oregano, basil, thyme)

1/2 teaspoon pink himalayan (or just sea) salt

1/2 tsp black cracked pepper

25g Extra Virgin olive oil

Toppings: feel free to mix and match!

Sundried tomato puree or passatta

1/4 Butternut Squash - peeled, cubed & roasted

8 x button/chestnut mushrooms - sliced

Wash the butternut squash, leaving the skin on. Slice length ways, and remove seeds, dice into 1cm sized cubes and place on a baking tray. Drizzle with Extra virgin olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Place in the oven for approx 20 mins until soft and nicely browned.

Meanwhile, make the pizza base - In a bowl, mix together all the dry ingredients, in a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs until frothy.

Add wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix well until evenly combined and forms dough like consistency. Shape dough into a ball and transfer to oiled parchment paper. Place another piece of parchment on top of the dough and roll dough to 1/2 cm thick at most. Remove top parchment and pop into oven.

Bake for 15 mins until the edges start to go brown and crispy.

Whilst the base is cooking, slice the red onion and mushrooms into thin slices and pan fry with a little olive oil for a few minutes. Remove from the hob. Drain the tinned artichoke and slice into smaller pieces. Remove the base from oven after the 15 minutes and coat with a generous layer of tomato puree, making sure you spread it to the edges. Arrange the roasted squash and artichoke over the base as evenly as possible, placing the sliced onion and mushroom on top. Sprinkle with dried oregano, season with salt and pepper and put back in the oven for 12-15 mins or until the toppings are cooked.

Serve with a side salad of mixed greens and a squeeze of lemon juice: - this could include

Watercress, romaine lettuce, cos lettuce, baby gem, lambs lettuce, kale, chard, white cabbage.

Ideal snack: Preconception nourish balls from The Pregnancy Food Co


Dogs fed a raw diet will actually get vitamin C from raw meat- especially organ meats (such as beef liver or kidney). Of course, foods exposed to oxygen (such as grinding) may have less than USDA analysis shows.

Of course, fresh plant matter will provide vitamin C. Cooked will, too, but water loss and the more heat that is used will mean more Vitamin C loss (but not total!).

Rosehip Tea

A while ago in the Human Support Group, a member asked about the vitamin C content in rose hip tea (for human use). Stay tuned for some backyard organic chemistry experiments which shows that rose hips properly prepared can provide a nice gentle vitamin C boost for humans and dogs.

Is it Beneficial?

Becuase dogs are able to synthesize vitamin C, it is reasonable to wonder if a dietary supply of vitamin C is beneficial. Keep in mind that dogs (and cats) have a reduced ability to synthesize vitamin C compared to other mammals.

During times of high stress, there is a potential that dogs are unable to synthesize optimal amounts of vitamin C even though they are able to increase production in the response to injury.

Conditions that may benefit from dietary vitamin C include chronic kidney disease, arthritis (particularly age related), during times when the dog is fighting an infection, and because older dogs can have disturbances to their ability to synthesize non-essential nutrients (glycine is another example), vitamin C can be beneficial there as well.

Canine athletes are also often supplemented with vitamin C (as well as increased levels of PUFAs as n-3 and vitamin E).

However, not every dog should have increased amounts of vitamin C. Vitamin C is relatively safe (though any condition, particularly cancer, you should check with your vet). Vitamin C can easily cause digestive upset in dogs.

How Much?

There is no recommended allowance for vitamin C per NRC (or any nutrient guideline) because it is non-essential. Vitamin C regenerates vitamin E at a 1:1 molar ratio and this ratio is used in clinical textbooks to provide a starting dose of vitamin C for dogs. When formulating, you could use a vitamin E to C ratio of 3:1 (note: it is not a 1:1 ratio on a mg basis, only a molar basis).

Simply put, if you have 3 mg of vitamin E, you would add 1 mg of vitamin C.

You don’t really need to overthink it. Therapeutic diets often go higher and work with specific amounts depending on the condition, but for adult, healthy dogs, inclusion of fresh fruits and veggies will boost vitamin C. Because dogs synthesize C, you don’t need to sweat it.

Also, keep in mind that most people over supplement vitamin E and so a 3:1 ratio may be too much vitamin C for the dog’s gut to tolerate or may provide an amount of C that is not longer beneficial and is excreted. Always start slow and work up.


Dogs fed a raw diet will actually get vitamin C from raw meat- especially organ meats (such as beef liver or kidney). Of course, foods exposed to oxygen (such as grinding) may have less than what the USDA analysis shows.

Of course, fresh plant matter will provide vitamin C. Cooked will, too, but water loss and the more heat that is used will mean more Vitamin C loss (but not total!).

Under disease states or for canine athletes, the amount of C needed is often too difficult to get from food alone.

Rosehip Tea

A while ago in the Human Support Group, a member asked about the vitamin C content in rosehip tea (for human use). Stay tuned for some backyard organic chemistry experiments which shows that rose hips properly prepared can provide a nice, gentle vitamin C boost for humans and dogs. Of course, there are analysis of rosehips themselves and some infusion methods, but I couldn’t find any that showed the cold brew method, which perhaps may be a better choice for Vitamin C.

Is it Beneficial?

Because dogs are able to synthesize vitamin C, it is reasonable to wonder if a dietary supply of vitamin C is beneficial. Keep in mind that dogs (and cats) have a reduced ability to synthesize vitamin C compared to other mammals.

During times of high stress, there is a potential that dogs are unable to synthesize optimal amounts of vitamin C even though they are able to increase production in the response to injury.

Conditions that may benefit from dietary vitamin C include chronic kidney disease, arthritis (particularly age related), during times when the dog is fighting an infection, and because older dogs can have disturbances to their ability to synthesize non-essential nutrients (glycine is another example), vitamin C can be beneficial there as well.

Canine athletes are also often supplemented with vitamin C (as well as increased levels of PUFAs as n-3 and vitamin E).

However, not every dog should have increased amounts of vitamin C. Vitamin C is relatively safe (though any condition, particularly cancer, you should check with your vet). Vitamin C can easily cause digestive upset in dogs.

How Much?

There is no recommended allowance for vitamin C per NRC (or any nutrient guideline) because it is non-essential. Vitamin C regenerates vitamin E at a 1:1 molar ratio and this ratio is used in clinical textbooks to provide a starting dose of vitamin C for dogs. When formulating, you could use a vitamin E to C ratio of 3:1 (note: it is not a 1:1 ratio on a mg basis, only a molar basis).

Simply put, if you have 3 mg of vitamin E, you would add 1 mg of vitamin C.

You don’t really need to overthink it. Therapeutic diets often go higher and work with specific amounts depending on the condition, but for adult, healthy dogs, inclusion of fresh fruits and veggies will boost vitamin C. Because dogs synthesize C, you don’t need to sweat it.

Also, keep in mind that most people over supplement vitamin E and so a 3:1 ratio may be too much vitamin C for the dog’s gut to tolerate or may provide an amount of C that is not longer beneficial and is excreted. Always start slow and work up.


Cold Brew Vitamin C Smoothie

If you don’t have time for both coffee and breakfast, why not blend them both together in a smoothie? Spicy and rich, this recipe contains sweet potato, a source of antioxidant vitamin C. This blend is perfect for cooler spring mornings or when you want a new, easy way to add Vitamin C to your diet (or both!).

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup unsweetened plant-based beverage
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cold brewed coffee
  • 1/3 cup cooked sweet potato flesh (from about 1/2 of a small, roasted sweet potato)
  • 1 frozen banana
  • 1/2 scoop French Vanilla Vega One® Organic All-in-One Shake
  • or 1/2 scoop Vanilla Vega® Essentials
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp ground ginger
  • freshly grated nutmeg, to taste
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla extract or ground vanilla
  • Small handful of ice

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a blender and blend on high until completely smooth and frothy (about 1 minute).


Vitamin C, 5.2 Mash Stabilizer, Brew Salt Additions & Interplay in H2O Chemistry Q's

OK, so I've been trying to read thoroughly and widely as regard to brew water chemistry. I'm not a science buff, but I enjoy the process of trying to figure things out. I've read tons of stuff here, watched Bobby's videos on Youtube, messed around with BeerSmith and the EZ Water Calculator. I've also read on Brewer's Friend and elsewhere. After reading, I decided to try using my tap water from home rather than buying Ice Mountain Spring Water from the store. I'm working on getting my water report from Ward. The publicly available one seems to be useless for brewing purposes. Once I get that taken care of, I'll be ready to move forward. But before I even get to that point I'm wondering about a few things.

First of all, I know that regardless of what the water report says, my water will have Chlorine and Chloramine in it. I know I can boil off Chlorine and supposedly Chloramine too with a 20-minute boil. I know some will disagree with me but I read it from a trusted source (www.sfwater.org/Files/FAQs/removal.pdf). Regardless, I'm not going to use this techinique. Keep reading. I don't want to boil off the Chlorine and Chloramine. Too much of a propane waste. So in the link listed above, I read that a 1000mg Vitamin C tablet will "remove chloramine [and chlorine] completely [from the water in] a medium size bathtub without significantly depressing pH." So, I'm thinking, OK, Vitamin C is cheap and readily available. I'll use that. There doesn't seem to be any risk of surface corrosion to stainless steel or plastic so there shouldn't be any worries. (Correct me if I'm wrong here).

I've also been reading that 5.2 Mash Stabilizer is a simple and great way to get your mash pH to that "5.2 sweet spot" but that it does so through Monosodium Phosphate (NaH2PO4) and Disodium Phosphate (Na2HPO4). So I'm thinking, OK, if I add that into my mash, it's going to affect the pH, dropping it to 5.2. But with the Vitamin C in there, that shouldn't be a problem. Tap water has a pH above 5.2 in fact it's often above 7. So if anything the Vitamin C will bring the pH down slightly making the 5.2 Mash Stabilizer not have to "work as hard."

Now, here are a few questions. 5.2 Mash Stabilizer will affect my pH but won't it also affect my water chemistry? Well, certainly it will! It will add those phosphates listed above. This would result in a different water profile. Which wouldn't this mean I need to enter different numbers in the water adjustment calculator? Well, I don't know!

So, then I go onto the question of brewing salt additions. How much will the additions of Vitamin C to remove the Chlorine & Chloramine and the addition of 5.2 Mash Stabilizer affect my water chemistry and water profile? Don't I need to know this to be able to figure out how much of the various brew salts (Gypsum, Calcium Carbonate, etc.) I need to add? I don't want to add too much and get any off flavors.

Will the additions of Vitamin C and 5.2 Mash Stabilizer affect the numbers I would add into my water adjustment calculator (i.e. Calcium, Magnesium, Sodium, Chloride, Sulfate)? I see "Na" (i.e. Sodium) among the chemicals that 5.2 Mash Stabilizer use to drop the pH. And I also see Sodium as one of the categories listed on the EZ Water Calculator. So do I need to adjust my levels?

5.2 Mash Stabilizer uses phosphates for it's work and the brew salts use carbonates, and sulfates, and other items not in 5.2 Mash Stabilizer. So while there are definite changes in the water chemistry, maybe it doesn't matter for the purposes of brew salt additions? This is where my lack of scientific expertise rears its head.


Watch the video: Bread Dark Flax: custard, leavened (October 2021).