Traditional recipes

Amaretto Bananas Foster

Amaretto Bananas Foster

Jessica Chou

Bananas Foster

An ex-roommate of mine used to make these after a particularly boozy night out, although considering how flammable butter/alcohol is, it probably wasn't the safest cooking experiment. You'll make your roommates very happy.

Click here to see Bananas, Bananas Everywhere.

Notes

Note: Experiment with rum, Frangelico, or any other alcohol you're partial to. No one judges at 2 a.m.

Ingredients

  • 2 ripe bananas
  • 2 Tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 Tablespoon brown sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons amaretto
  • Vanilla ice cream

Recipe: Bananas Foster

NEW YORK — In 1951, New Orleans restaurateur Owen Brennan became an innovator in the field of back-scratching when he named a dessert after his buddy Richard Foster from the New Orleans Crime Commission.

Bananas Foster became a customer favorite and was Brennan’s most-ordered item until the French Quarter institution closed last summer.

The dessert’s popularity is easy to account for: It is sweet, boozy, sticky, creamy and flammable. Even if you don’t like bananas, you just might make an exception for bananas Foster.

There are only two problems with Brennan’s recipe, which actually was invented not by Brennan himself but by chef Paul Blange.

The first is that it calls for banana liqueur. Have you ever had banana liqueur? If not, rest assured that it’s just as terrible as it sounds. It belongs to the family of cloying flavored brandies that I loved when I was a teenager but now have serious qualms about. Unless you’re (a) preparing to throw a rager while your parents are out of town, (b) planning to make a Platanos en Mole Old Fashioned, or (c) both of the above, you have no business being in possession of a bottle of banana liqueur.

So what should you use? Kill two birds with one stone by using amaretto, which lends bananas Foster a pleasant almond flavor without interfering with its smooth texture, the way chopped nuts do. (Actual nuts have no place in bananas foster, which should be so soft you’d be able to eat it even if you had no teeth.)

The second problem with Brennan’s bananas Foster recipe is the way it instructs you to light the rum sauce on fire: “tip the pan slightly (into the fire of the burner) to ignite the rum.”

Yeah, right — as if anyone’s ever done this without spilling hot butterscotch all over the stove, possibly extinguishing their pilot light in the process.

Please, do yourself a favor and use a long match or a kitchen lighter to set your bananas Foster aflame. It’s much easier than this slight-tipping business, and much less likely to result in a visit from your friendly neighborhood firefighters.

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

4 bananas, halved lengthwise

To cook bananas: In large skillet, combine brown sugar, butter, cinnamon, allspice and salt over low heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes or until butter has melted and mixture begins to bubble. Add amaretto. Cook, stirring, until mixture is smooth. Increase heat to medium. Add bananas. Cook for 5 minutes or until bananas are coated in sauce and warmed through.

To flame bananas: Add rum to skillet. Light match or lighter. Lower it to surface of sauce until it ignites. Wait until flame subsides. Turn off heat.

To serve: Divide ice cream into 4 bowls. Divide bananas and sauce among bowls. Serve immediately.


Recipe: Bananas Foster

In 1951, New Orleans restaurateur Owen Brennan became an innovator in the field of back-scratching when he named a dessert after his buddy Richard Foster from the New Orleans Crime Commission. Bananas Foster became a customer favorite and was Brennan’s most-ordered item until the French Quarter institution closed last summer. The dessert’s popularity is easy to account for: It is sweet, boozy, sticky, creamy and flammable. Even if you don’t like bananas, you just might make an exception for bananas Foster.

There are only two problems with Brennan’s recipe, which was actually invented not by Brennan himself but by chef Paul Blangé. The first is that it calls for banana liqueur. Have you ever had banana liqueur? If not, rest assured that it’s just as terrible as it sounds. It belongs to the family of cloying flavored brandies that, like Dan Bern’s 1997 ballad “Marilyn,” I loved when I was a teen-ager but now have serious qualms about. Unless you’re (a) preparing to throw a rager while your parents are out of town, (b) planning to make a Platanos en Mole Old Fashioned, or (c) both of the above, you have no business being in possession of a bottle of banana liqueur.

So what should you use instead? Kill two birds with one stone by using amaretto, which lends bananas Foster a pleasant almond flavor without interfering with its smooth texture, the way chopped nuts do. (Actual nuts have no place in bananas foster, which should be so soft you’d be able to eat it even if you had no teeth.)

The other problem with Brennan’s bananas Foster recipe is the way it instructs you to light the rum sauce on fire: “tip the pan slightly [into the fire of the burner] to ignite the rum.” Yeah, right — as if anyone’s ever done this without spilling hot butterscotch all over their stove, possibly extinguishing their pilot light in the process. Please, do yourself a favor and use a long match or a kitchen lighter to set your bananas Foster aflame. It’s much easier than this slight-tipping business, and much less likely to result in a visit from your friendly neighborhood firefighters.


Amaretto a great fit for storied Bananas Foster

Even if you don't like bananas, you just might make an exception for Bananas Foster.

NEW YORK — In 1951, New Orleans restaurateur Owen Brennan became an innovator in the field of back-scratching when he named a dessert after his buddy Richard Foster from the New Orleans Crime Commission. Bananas Foster became a customer favorite and was Brennan’s most-ordered item until the French Quarter institution closed last summer. The dessert’s popularity is easy to account for: It is sweet, boozy, sticky, creamy and flammable. Even if you don’t like bananas, you just might make an exception for bananas Foster.

There are only two problems with Brennan’s recipe, which was actually invented not by Brennan himself but by chef Paul Blange. The first is that it calls for banana liqueur. Have you ever had banana liqueur? If not, rest assured that it’s just as terrible as it sounds. It belongs to the family of cloying flavored brandies that, like Dan Bern’s 1997 ballad “Marilyn,” I loved when I was a teenager but now have serious qualms about. Unless you’re (a) preparing to throw a rager while your parents are out of town, (b) planning to make a Platanos en Mole Old Fashioned, or (c) both of the above, you have no business being in possession of a bottle of banana liqueur.

So what should you use instead? Kill two birds with one stone by using amaretto, which lends bananas Foster a pleasant almond flavor without interfering with its smooth texture, the way chopped nuts do. (Actual nuts have no place in bananas foster, which should be so soft you’d be able to eat it even if you had no teeth.)

The other problem with Brennan’s bananas Foster recipe is the way it instructs you to light the rum sauce on fire: “tip the pan slightly … into the fire of the burner … to ignite the rum.” Yeah, right — as if anyone’s ever done this without spilling hot butterscotch all over their stove, possibly extinguishing their pilot light in the process. Please, do yourself a favor and use a long match or a kitchen lighter to set your bananas Foster aflame. It’s much easier than this slight-tipping business, and much less likely to result in a visit from your friendly neighborhood firefighters.

Bananas Foster

Yield: 4 servings. Time: About 30 minutes

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

4 bananas, halved lengthwise

Put the brown sugar, butter, cinnamon, allspice, and salt in a large skillet over low heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the butter has melted and the mixture begins to bubble, about 15 minutes. Add the amaretto and cook, stirring, until the mixture is smooth, then raise the heat to medium and add the bananas. Cook until the bananas are coated in the sauce and warmed through, about 5 minutes.

Add the rum to the skillet. Light a match or lighter and lower it to the surface of the sauce until it ignites. When the flame subsides, turn off the heat. Divide the ice cream into four bowls, then divide the bananas and sauce among the bowls. Serve immediately.


Recipe Summary

  • ½ cup butter
  • 6 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breast halves - cut into 1 inch cubes
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 small bananas, sliced
  • 2 (1.5 fluid ounce) jiggers amaretto liqueur
  • ¾ cup coconut-flavored rum

Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat, and stir in the brown sugar. Season the chicken with salt and pepper, and toss with flour to coat. Add chicken and bananas to the skillet, and cook stirring occasionally until chicken is almost cooked through. Stir in the amaretto and rum, and heat through. Remove from the burner, and use a long match or lighter to flambe. Allow to burn until the alcohol cooks off and the flame goes out. Serve and enjoy!


Cocktail Recipes

(created by Andy and Shana @ Old Oyster Factory)
2oz Banana Foster Rum
1oz kahlua
1oz creme de cacao
2oz half and half
pinch of nutmeg
drizzle with caramel sauce and garnish with a brule’d banana

Monkey Mule

(created by Christine Chabot @ Murasaki)
1.5oz Bananas Foster Rum
0.5oz chambord
top with ginger beer

Smokey & the Banana

(created by Oscar Chena @ Otto Izakaya)
1oz Bananas Foster Rum
1oz mezcal
0.75oz lemon juice
0.75oz simple syrup
1oz orange juice
2 dashes black walnut bitters

Russian in Board Shorts

1.5oz Bananas Foster Rum
0.5oz kahlua
1oz cream

High Standards

(created by Nicole Morris @ Neat Bourbon Bar)
2oz Bananas Foster Rum
0.75oz sage simple syrup
1oz lemon juice

Banana Mojito

1.5oz Bananas Foster Rum
fresh muddled mint
simple syrup
lime
top with soda water

Bananzerac

(created by Angelo Calato @ Ji-Roz)
1.25oz Bananas Foster Rum
1oz Lewis Redmond Bourbon
2 dashes angostura bitters
4 dashes black walnut bitters
splash cinnamon simple syrup.

Banana Bread Pudding

(created by Carson League @ Vault & Vator)
1.5oz Bananas Foster Rum
0.5oz Mountain Peak
0.25oz heavy cream
0.25oz bourbon cream
0.25oz drambuie
0.25oz cinnamon simple syrup

The Jack Johnson

(created by Carson League @ Vault & Vator)
1oz Bananas Foster Rum
1oz pecan vodka
0.25oz maple syrup
1 egg white
2 dashes black walnut bitters

The Nutter Butter

1oz Bananas Foster Rum
0.5oz peanut butter whiskey
0.5oz half & half


Recipes

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy&rsquos Vanilla
1 part Fireball Cinnamon Whisky
1 part banana liqueur
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. Peach Whiskey
1 part OJ
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
1 part tequila
3 parts margarita mix
1 part lime juice
Combine ingredients over ice, stir and serve.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Coffee
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part Irish cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
2 parts Milk (Chocolate Milk is optional)
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Apple Whiskey
3 parts ginger ale
Combine ingredients over ice and serve.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Coffee
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part Irish cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part chocolate liqueur
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Honey Whiskey
1 part Fireball® Whisky
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Apple Pie
3 parts 7-Up®
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Coffee
2 parts soda water
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
1 part Fireball Whisky
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Wild Grape
1 part Platinum Vodka
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
3 parts Coke®
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
3 parts root beer
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

3 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
2 parts 7-up®
1 part lime juice
splash of cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice garnished with a twist of lime.

1 part Dr. Mcgillicuddy's Mentholmint

Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Wild Grape
1 part Blackberry Brandy
1 part Triple Sec
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Apple Whiskey
2 parts cranberry juice
Combine ingredients over ice and serve.

2 parts Dr. Blackberry Whiskey
1 part lemonade
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Apple Pie
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. Blackberry Whiskey
1 part soda
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Coffee
2 parts hot chocolate
Serve hot as a winter warmer

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
1 part Fireball Whisky
1 part Irish cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
1 part dark rum
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
1 part Irish whiskey
Orange juice chaser
Mix, chill, shoot and chase.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Apple Pie
1 part Fireball Cinnamon Whisky
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice

1 part Dr. Blackberry Whiskey
1 part simple syrup
Dash of bitters
Soda water
Combine ingredients over ice and garnish with cherry.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Wild Grape
1 part vanilla vodka
3 parts ginger ale
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice with a lemon slice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Apple Pie
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
1 part coffee liqueur
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
1 part triple sec
1 part pineapple juice
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
3 parts cream soda
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
3 parts lemon-lime soda
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Coffee
1 part Platinum Vodka
2 parts half and half
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Honey Whiskey
3 parts regular or hard cider
Combine ingredients over ice and serve.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part amaretto
1 part lime juice
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Peach Whiskey
3 parts sweet or iced tea
Combine ingredients over ice and serve.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
3 parts Platinum Vodka
Serve chilled ingredients in a martini glass.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
1 part milk
1 part dark crème de cacao
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
2 parts 7-up®
splash of cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

3 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Wild Grape
1 part Ruby Red Grapefruit Juice
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
3 parts orange juice
Splash of grenadine
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
3 parts 7-up®
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 1/2 part Dr. Honey Whiskey
2 parts ginger ale
Dash Bitters
Combine ingredients over ice and garnish with lemon wedge.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part chocolate liqueur
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. Peach Whiskey
2 parts Ryans® Irish Cream Liqueur

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
3 parts Coke®
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
2 parts Milk (Chocolate Milk is optional)
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
4 parts hot chocolate
Combine ingredients in a glass, stir and serve hot.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
2 parts coffee liqueur
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Apple Pie
1 part spiced rum
3 parts hot apple cider
Combine ingredients in a mug, stir and enjoy.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
1 part Fireball Cinnamon Whisky
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

Must be 21 to follow and engage. Dr. McGillicuddy’s Liqueur 15-30% Alc/Vol Dr. McGillicuddy’s Whiskey with natural flavors 30% alc/vol Sazerac Co., New Orleans, LA.


Banana Foster Recipe

Learn how easy it is to make this exciting and dramatic Banana Foster dessert for your family and friends. This original Banana Foster recipe is from the Brennan’s Restaurant in New Orleans, Louisiana. I have adapted the wording in this recipe to make it easier to understand how to flambe.

More delicious Louisiana dishes to serve your family and friends and also to help celebrate Mardi Gras.

History of Banana Foster:

In the 1950’s, New Orleans was the major port of entry for bananas shipped from Central and South America. In 1951, Owen Edward Brennan challenged his talented chef, Paul Blang to include bananas in a new culinary creation. The scrumptious dessert was named for Richard Foster, who, as chairman, served with Owen on the New Orleans Crime Commission, a civic effort to clean up the French Quarter. Richard Foster, owner of the Foster Awning Company, was a frequent customer of Brennan’s and a very good friend of Owen.

Little did anyone realize that Bananas Foster would become an international favorite and is the most requested item on the restaurant’s menu. Thirty-five thousand pounds of bananas are flamed each year at Brennan’s in the preparation of its world-famous dessert.


Bananas Foster Colada

Take a mental journey with me for a moment. Warm tropical breezes, salty ocean air, the rustling of palm fronds, the distinct sounds of nature, and the glorious crashing of ocean waves against the shoreline…PURE AMAZINGNESS!

Friends I live in Michigan and even though we have an abundance of shoreline from The Great Lakes there’s no tropical feel here. Not in the least.

I’ve found my own way to tropical bliss in cocktail form: a Bananas Foster Colada! Ding ding, we’ve found a winner!

You may not get beachy waves in your hair but I can assure you that you’ll feel swept away to an island oasis. When the reality is that you have a lounge chair on your back deck waving to the neighbors while waiting for the laundry to finish. But who cares, this cocktail is fantastic.

Aside from getting out my blender and putting on some beachy tunes, this recipe starts with the basics: Rum, Piña Colada mixer, and caramel. Yes, CARAMEL!

I was envisioning the decadent and oh so famous Bananas Foster dessert when I was concocting this cocktail. Piña Colada mixer and caramel go amazingly well together. So where’s the bananas portion come into play? By adding in Bacardi Banana Flavored Rum, the key to this delicious drink.

You know Bacardi Superior Rum is the perfect addition to summery drinks, everything from rum punches, daiquiris and of course coladas. Bacardi Banana Flavored Rum was just the perfect addition to my tropical cocktail, I know you’ll agree.

So tell me, where do you dream of going to hear your favorite band? You guessed it, I’m dreaming of somewhere tropical and beachy!

May I suggest more delicious cocktails for you to try:


Food Junta

In harsh economic times like these, huddling around fires for warmth is all the rage, but oil drums are sooooo last century. What’s today’s modern Hoovervillian to do? Well hoboes and hoboettes, I’m glad you asked because here at Food Junta we pledge to continue bringing you recipes on the singed-and-smoking edge of Pyrotechnical Gastronomy, for all of your dining, showboating and huddling needs.

Okay fine, that and my apartment is still full of a lot of leftover booze that I’d rather burn than drink. Today’s recipe is for Bananas Foster, a rich, bubbling mass of butter, sugar, bananas, and fiery liquor that I was introduced to by a Cajun roommate while studying abroad in Italy. Naturally we used grappa at the time because hey, when in Rome, right? But while many types of liquor will burn and caramelize your ingredients, not to mention warm your fingerless-gloved hands, dark rum has traditionally been the fuel of choice.

According to Bensick’s Apocryphal Food Tales, Bananas Foster is named after John Foster Dulles, Eisenhower’s Secretary of State, who first whipped up the volatile concoction in 1954 in an attempt to assassinate the leftist president of Guatemala and defend the interests of the United Fruit Company. True story. True story? Dulles would later retire to the Virginia countryside and become an international airport, but his legacy lives on in this regime-changingly delicious recipe. And while the culinary shock and awe of weaponized butter and bananas may be impressive to behold, it is astoundingly easy to make. From start to finish you won’t spend more than 15 minutes, which makes Bananas Foster a great afterthought dessert. In today’s case I had been working on a massive dinner with my friend Rice, the critically acclaimed food-photog, cook and radio personality whose shots accompany this post, and man oh man was it a relief after hours in the kitchen to finish things off with a recipe so incredibly easy it makes scrambling eggs feel like the Bataan Death March. Ingredients follow:

4Tbsp unsalted butter (1/2 stick)

6 oz. dark rum – although I used Bacardi Gold, which worked fine

3 bananas – cut into pieces

A big fat pinch of cinnamon

1. Melt butter and sugar together into a smooth brown paste and caramelize for 3 to 5 minutes.

2. Stir in pieces of banana.

3. Turn heat to low and add rum.

4. Stir for a minute, then strike match and torch the damn thing.

5. Now here’s where the optional cinnamon comes in: drop a few big pinches of cinnamon into your hand and throw it straight onto the flames. The powder ignites and sparkles ooo-ing and awe-ing ensue you’ll be hailed as the greatest showman since PT Barnum. Just don’t get carried away though or you’ll end up like me, with a stove covered in cinnamon.

When the flames subside the bananas will be softened, sweetened, soaked with alcohol and swimming in butter. What wouldn’t taste great under those conditions? Serve with vanilla ice cream, and you may very well be so content that you’ll never want to vary the recipe, or eat anything else for that matter. But, just in case, there are variations:

For pyromaniacs with loftier culinary ambitions and deeper liquor cabinets than my own, I feel obliged to mention that in the true, authentic Bananas Foster recipe the 6 oz of booze is divided into two parts rum and one part banana liqueur – banana schnapps or crème de banana. Since the objective of my apartment’s Long Term Strategic Booze Reduction Plan (LTS-BRP) is to use up all the leftover, post-party hooch that we already have, I chose to stick with rum alone and the results were great, but this idea of using a complementary flavored alcohol to caramelize the bananas got me thinking about all the other fruity drinks out there and the plants from whence they came. Shouldn’t the Foster Formula of fruit, sugar, butter, liquor and fire work for them too?

You could, for example, take apples, cook longer than the bananas in order to soften them, and then finish them off with a towering inferno of rum and calvados. You could do the same to cherries with kirsch, pears with pear brandy, peaches with peach schnapps (or even amaretto), and then you, my friend, would be the proud owner of the girliest liquor cabinet outside of The View’s green room. But really, there do seem to be limitless possibilities. Go start a fire: you’ll probably end up with something delicious.


Watch the video: How to Make Bananas Foster. Mardi Gras Recipes. (October 2021).