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Gordon Ramsay Slams ‘Bloody Pompous’ Chefs Who Ban Photos

Gordon Ramsay Slams ‘Bloody Pompous’ Chefs Who Ban Photos

Ramsay called chef Michel Roux an “old fart” for banning Instagram in his restaurant

Dreamstime

Gordon Ramsay says customers should be able to take photos if they want.

Gordon Ramsay has no patience for chefs who ban customers from taking photos of their food for Instagram, and he took to Twitter to call one well-regarded fellow chef “bloody pompous” and “an old fart” for telling customers to put away their phones in the dining room.

Chef Michel Roux made the news recently for telling customers to stop taking photos of the food at his three-Michelin-star restaurant, The Waterside Inn in Berkshire. Instagramming photos of restaurant meals is a huge trend lately, but Roux can’t stand the practice.

“I’m really getting so upset about people taking pictures. We put up a card at the door — ‘No photos, please,’” he told The Telegraph. “Maybe once during the meal you want to take a little photo of something because it’s unusual. But what about the flavors? A picture on a phone cannot possibly capture the flavors.”

When Gordon Ramsay heard about Roux’s photo ban, he took to Twitter to blast the decision.

How bloody pompous! It’s a compliment to the chef the fact that customers want to take a pictures of dishes they’ve paid for it’s 2017 https://t.co/lhkDq23wCR

— Gordon Ramsay (@GordonRamsay) November 3, 2017

Exactly Bradly.it’s a free promotion they should be grateful for, can you imagine being asked not to take a picture of Ed Sheeran singing https://t.co/5Limp3ZK88

— Gordon Ramsay (@GordonRamsay) November 3, 2017

He even called Roux an “old fart” who’s forgotten to move on.

If I see a great looking picture posted, I’ll want to go and eat there immediately, he’s just an old fart who’s forgotten to move on ! https://t.co/t81hM7K5YF

— Gordon Ramsay (@GordonRamsay) November 3, 2017

Ramsay also pointed out that even the Michelin Guides themselves post photos of their experiences in restaurants.

He doesn’t think much of The Waterside Inn’s requirement that men wear jackets even when it’s “boiling” in the dining room, either.

The Waterside Inn was first awarded three Michelin stars in 1985, and it’s managed to hold onto them for more than 30 years. In 2010 it became the first restaurant outside of France to have held a Michelin three-star rating for 25 years. Their food is very good, but anybody looking to take pictures or remove their jackets might want to consider a visit to one of the world’s 15 most Instagrammable destinations instead.


Gordon Ramsay: Chefs objecting to food photography is 'bloody pompous'

The chef was responding to reports that Michel Roux has asked diners to refrain from taking pictures​​ at his three-Michelin-starred Bray restaurant The Waterside Inn.

“We put a card at the door saying ‘No photos, please,” Roux told the Daily Mail​.

“A picture on a phone cannot possibly capture the flavours.”

In a series of tweets, Ramsay said chefs should welcome Instagrammers as a useful advertising tool.

“How bloody pompous! It’s a compliment to the chef the fact that customers want to take a picture of dishes they’ve paid for,” he wrote.

“[It’s] free promotion they should be grateful for, can you imagine being asked not to take a picture of Ed Sheeran singing?

“Customers vote with their feet, pictures create huge followers and excite potential business.

“It’s also a wake-up call to us chefs when we get it wrong!”

The chef even praised the Michelin Guide’s somewhat controversial use of its Twitter account.

He wrote: “The fact that even @MichelinGuideUK​ @guideMichelinFR​ are posting exciting pictures from their experiences is such a breath of fresh air. ”

Food photography has proved divisive among chefs. French chef Alexandre Gauthier imposed an outright ban in his restaurant La Grenouillere in 2014, and high-end restaurants such as Thomas Keller’s Per Se and The Fat Duck also discourage flash photography.

Ramsay himself regularly posts pictures of food from his own restaurants, and critiques images of recipes from amateur cooks.


Gordon Ramsay: Chefs objecting to food photography is 'bloody pompous'

The chef was responding to reports that Michel Roux has asked diners to refrain from taking pictures​​ at his three-Michelin-starred Bray restaurant The Waterside Inn.

“We put a card at the door saying ‘No photos, please,” Roux told the Daily Mail​.

“A picture on a phone cannot possibly capture the flavours.”

In a series of tweets, Ramsay said chefs should welcome Instagrammers as a useful advertising tool.

“How bloody pompous! It’s a compliment to the chef the fact that customers want to take a picture of dishes they’ve paid for,” he wrote.

“[It’s] free promotion they should be grateful for, can you imagine being asked not to take a picture of Ed Sheeran singing?

“Customers vote with their feet, pictures create huge followers and excite potential business.

“It’s also a wake-up call to us chefs when we get it wrong!”

The chef even praised the Michelin Guide’s somewhat controversial use of its Twitter account.

He wrote: “The fact that even @MichelinGuideUK​ @guideMichelinFR​ are posting exciting pictures from their experiences is such a breath of fresh air. ”

Food photography has proved divisive among chefs. French chef Alexandre Gauthier imposed an outright ban in his restaurant La Grenouillere in 2014, and high-end restaurants such as Thomas Keller’s Per Se and The Fat Duck also discourage flash photography.

Ramsay himself regularly posts pictures of food from his own restaurants, and critiques images of recipes from amateur cooks.


Gordon Ramsay: Chefs objecting to food photography is 'bloody pompous'

The chef was responding to reports that Michel Roux has asked diners to refrain from taking pictures​​ at his three-Michelin-starred Bray restaurant The Waterside Inn.

“We put a card at the door saying ‘No photos, please,” Roux told the Daily Mail​.

“A picture on a phone cannot possibly capture the flavours.”

In a series of tweets, Ramsay said chefs should welcome Instagrammers as a useful advertising tool.

“How bloody pompous! It’s a compliment to the chef the fact that customers want to take a picture of dishes they’ve paid for,” he wrote.

“[It’s] free promotion they should be grateful for, can you imagine being asked not to take a picture of Ed Sheeran singing?

“Customers vote with their feet, pictures create huge followers and excite potential business.

“It’s also a wake-up call to us chefs when we get it wrong!”

The chef even praised the Michelin Guide’s somewhat controversial use of its Twitter account.

He wrote: “The fact that even @MichelinGuideUK​ @guideMichelinFR​ are posting exciting pictures from their experiences is such a breath of fresh air. ”

Food photography has proved divisive among chefs. French chef Alexandre Gauthier imposed an outright ban in his restaurant La Grenouillere in 2014, and high-end restaurants such as Thomas Keller’s Per Se and The Fat Duck also discourage flash photography.

Ramsay himself regularly posts pictures of food from his own restaurants, and critiques images of recipes from amateur cooks.


Gordon Ramsay: Chefs objecting to food photography is 'bloody pompous'

The chef was responding to reports that Michel Roux has asked diners to refrain from taking pictures​​ at his three-Michelin-starred Bray restaurant The Waterside Inn.

“We put a card at the door saying ‘No photos, please,” Roux told the Daily Mail​.

“A picture on a phone cannot possibly capture the flavours.”

In a series of tweets, Ramsay said chefs should welcome Instagrammers as a useful advertising tool.

“How bloody pompous! It’s a compliment to the chef the fact that customers want to take a picture of dishes they’ve paid for,” he wrote.

“[It’s] free promotion they should be grateful for, can you imagine being asked not to take a picture of Ed Sheeran singing?

“Customers vote with their feet, pictures create huge followers and excite potential business.

“It’s also a wake-up call to us chefs when we get it wrong!”

The chef even praised the Michelin Guide’s somewhat controversial use of its Twitter account.

He wrote: “The fact that even @MichelinGuideUK​ @guideMichelinFR​ are posting exciting pictures from their experiences is such a breath of fresh air. ”

Food photography has proved divisive among chefs. French chef Alexandre Gauthier imposed an outright ban in his restaurant La Grenouillere in 2014, and high-end restaurants such as Thomas Keller’s Per Se and The Fat Duck also discourage flash photography.

Ramsay himself regularly posts pictures of food from his own restaurants, and critiques images of recipes from amateur cooks.


Gordon Ramsay: Chefs objecting to food photography is 'bloody pompous'

The chef was responding to reports that Michel Roux has asked diners to refrain from taking pictures​​ at his three-Michelin-starred Bray restaurant The Waterside Inn.

“We put a card at the door saying ‘No photos, please,” Roux told the Daily Mail​.

“A picture on a phone cannot possibly capture the flavours.”

In a series of tweets, Ramsay said chefs should welcome Instagrammers as a useful advertising tool.

“How bloody pompous! It’s a compliment to the chef the fact that customers want to take a picture of dishes they’ve paid for,” he wrote.

“[It’s] free promotion they should be grateful for, can you imagine being asked not to take a picture of Ed Sheeran singing?

“Customers vote with their feet, pictures create huge followers and excite potential business.

“It’s also a wake-up call to us chefs when we get it wrong!”

The chef even praised the Michelin Guide’s somewhat controversial use of its Twitter account.

He wrote: “The fact that even @MichelinGuideUK​ @guideMichelinFR​ are posting exciting pictures from their experiences is such a breath of fresh air. ”

Food photography has proved divisive among chefs. French chef Alexandre Gauthier imposed an outright ban in his restaurant La Grenouillere in 2014, and high-end restaurants such as Thomas Keller’s Per Se and The Fat Duck also discourage flash photography.

Ramsay himself regularly posts pictures of food from his own restaurants, and critiques images of recipes from amateur cooks.


Gordon Ramsay: Chefs objecting to food photography is 'bloody pompous'

The chef was responding to reports that Michel Roux has asked diners to refrain from taking pictures​​ at his three-Michelin-starred Bray restaurant The Waterside Inn.

“We put a card at the door saying ‘No photos, please,” Roux told the Daily Mail​.

“A picture on a phone cannot possibly capture the flavours.”

In a series of tweets, Ramsay said chefs should welcome Instagrammers as a useful advertising tool.

“How bloody pompous! It’s a compliment to the chef the fact that customers want to take a picture of dishes they’ve paid for,” he wrote.

“[It’s] free promotion they should be grateful for, can you imagine being asked not to take a picture of Ed Sheeran singing?

“Customers vote with their feet, pictures create huge followers and excite potential business.

“It’s also a wake-up call to us chefs when we get it wrong!”

The chef even praised the Michelin Guide’s somewhat controversial use of its Twitter account.

He wrote: “The fact that even @MichelinGuideUK​ @guideMichelinFR​ are posting exciting pictures from their experiences is such a breath of fresh air. ”

Food photography has proved divisive among chefs. French chef Alexandre Gauthier imposed an outright ban in his restaurant La Grenouillere in 2014, and high-end restaurants such as Thomas Keller’s Per Se and The Fat Duck also discourage flash photography.

Ramsay himself regularly posts pictures of food from his own restaurants, and critiques images of recipes from amateur cooks.


Gordon Ramsay: Chefs objecting to food photography is 'bloody pompous'

The chef was responding to reports that Michel Roux has asked diners to refrain from taking pictures​​ at his three-Michelin-starred Bray restaurant The Waterside Inn.

“We put a card at the door saying ‘No photos, please,” Roux told the Daily Mail​.

“A picture on a phone cannot possibly capture the flavours.”

In a series of tweets, Ramsay said chefs should welcome Instagrammers as a useful advertising tool.

“How bloody pompous! It’s a compliment to the chef the fact that customers want to take a picture of dishes they’ve paid for,” he wrote.

“[It’s] free promotion they should be grateful for, can you imagine being asked not to take a picture of Ed Sheeran singing?

“Customers vote with their feet, pictures create huge followers and excite potential business.

“It’s also a wake-up call to us chefs when we get it wrong!”

The chef even praised the Michelin Guide’s somewhat controversial use of its Twitter account.

He wrote: “The fact that even @MichelinGuideUK​ @guideMichelinFR​ are posting exciting pictures from their experiences is such a breath of fresh air. ”

Food photography has proved divisive among chefs. French chef Alexandre Gauthier imposed an outright ban in his restaurant La Grenouillere in 2014, and high-end restaurants such as Thomas Keller’s Per Se and The Fat Duck also discourage flash photography.

Ramsay himself regularly posts pictures of food from his own restaurants, and critiques images of recipes from amateur cooks.


Gordon Ramsay: Chefs objecting to food photography is 'bloody pompous'

The chef was responding to reports that Michel Roux has asked diners to refrain from taking pictures​​ at his three-Michelin-starred Bray restaurant The Waterside Inn.

“We put a card at the door saying ‘No photos, please,” Roux told the Daily Mail​.

“A picture on a phone cannot possibly capture the flavours.”

In a series of tweets, Ramsay said chefs should welcome Instagrammers as a useful advertising tool.

“How bloody pompous! It’s a compliment to the chef the fact that customers want to take a picture of dishes they’ve paid for,” he wrote.

“[It’s] free promotion they should be grateful for, can you imagine being asked not to take a picture of Ed Sheeran singing?

“Customers vote with their feet, pictures create huge followers and excite potential business.

“It’s also a wake-up call to us chefs when we get it wrong!”

The chef even praised the Michelin Guide’s somewhat controversial use of its Twitter account.

He wrote: “The fact that even @MichelinGuideUK​ @guideMichelinFR​ are posting exciting pictures from their experiences is such a breath of fresh air. ”

Food photography has proved divisive among chefs. French chef Alexandre Gauthier imposed an outright ban in his restaurant La Grenouillere in 2014, and high-end restaurants such as Thomas Keller’s Per Se and The Fat Duck also discourage flash photography.

Ramsay himself regularly posts pictures of food from his own restaurants, and critiques images of recipes from amateur cooks.


Gordon Ramsay: Chefs objecting to food photography is 'bloody pompous'

The chef was responding to reports that Michel Roux has asked diners to refrain from taking pictures​​ at his three-Michelin-starred Bray restaurant The Waterside Inn.

“We put a card at the door saying ‘No photos, please,” Roux told the Daily Mail​.

“A picture on a phone cannot possibly capture the flavours.”

In a series of tweets, Ramsay said chefs should welcome Instagrammers as a useful advertising tool.

“How bloody pompous! It’s a compliment to the chef the fact that customers want to take a picture of dishes they’ve paid for,” he wrote.

“[It’s] free promotion they should be grateful for, can you imagine being asked not to take a picture of Ed Sheeran singing?

“Customers vote with their feet, pictures create huge followers and excite potential business.

“It’s also a wake-up call to us chefs when we get it wrong!”

The chef even praised the Michelin Guide’s somewhat controversial use of its Twitter account.

He wrote: “The fact that even @MichelinGuideUK​ @guideMichelinFR​ are posting exciting pictures from their experiences is such a breath of fresh air. ”

Food photography has proved divisive among chefs. French chef Alexandre Gauthier imposed an outright ban in his restaurant La Grenouillere in 2014, and high-end restaurants such as Thomas Keller’s Per Se and The Fat Duck also discourage flash photography.

Ramsay himself regularly posts pictures of food from his own restaurants, and critiques images of recipes from amateur cooks.


Gordon Ramsay: Chefs objecting to food photography is 'bloody pompous'

The chef was responding to reports that Michel Roux has asked diners to refrain from taking pictures​​ at his three-Michelin-starred Bray restaurant The Waterside Inn.

“We put a card at the door saying ‘No photos, please,” Roux told the Daily Mail​.

“A picture on a phone cannot possibly capture the flavours.”

In a series of tweets, Ramsay said chefs should welcome Instagrammers as a useful advertising tool.

“How bloody pompous! It’s a compliment to the chef the fact that customers want to take a picture of dishes they’ve paid for,” he wrote.

“[It’s] free promotion they should be grateful for, can you imagine being asked not to take a picture of Ed Sheeran singing?

“Customers vote with their feet, pictures create huge followers and excite potential business.

“It’s also a wake-up call to us chefs when we get it wrong!”

The chef even praised the Michelin Guide’s somewhat controversial use of its Twitter account.

He wrote: “The fact that even @MichelinGuideUK​ @guideMichelinFR​ are posting exciting pictures from their experiences is such a breath of fresh air. ”

Food photography has proved divisive among chefs. French chef Alexandre Gauthier imposed an outright ban in his restaurant La Grenouillere in 2014, and high-end restaurants such as Thomas Keller’s Per Se and The Fat Duck also discourage flash photography.

Ramsay himself regularly posts pictures of food from his own restaurants, and critiques images of recipes from amateur cooks.


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