Traditional recipes

Port-Braised Short Ribs

Port-Braised Short Ribs

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Season the short ribs with salt and pepper, to taste. Heat the olive oil in a large sauté pan over high heat. Add the short ribs and sear on both sides, about 5 minutes. Add the onions and carrots and cook, stirring occasionally, until brown around the edges, about 10 minutes. Remove the short ribs to a plate with a slotted spoon.

Add the port off the heat and reduce by ½, about 6-7 minutes. Add the bay leaves, tarragon, and chicken stock and return the short ribs to the pan together with any accumulated juices. Cover with a lid, place in the oven, and braise until tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, about 1 ½ hours.

Let the short ribs cool in their liquid. Place in the refrigerator overnight. The next day, skim off any solidified fat at the top, and drain the meat and vegetables, reserving the cooking liquid. Discard the bay leaves and tarragon sprigs.

Transfer the cooking liquid back to the sauté pan and reduce over high heat until thick, about 12-15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place the meat and vegetables back in the pan to reheat briefly, and serve garnished with the chopped tarragon.


Recipe Summary

  • 4 pounds beef short ribs, cut through the bone into 2 1/2- to 3-inch pieces
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 cup diced onion
  • 1 cup diced carrots
  • 1 cup diced celery
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 2 whole star anise or 1/2 teaspoon anise seeds
  • 1 cinnamon stick (1 1/2 to 2 in. long)
  • 5 sprigs (about 4 in. long) fresh rosemary, rinsed
  • 3 cups fat-skimmed beef broth
  • 1 cup tangerine or orange juice
  • ¾ cup ruby port
  • 1 tangerine (about 5 oz.) or orange, rinsed and thinly sliced crosswise

Rinse ribs and pat dry trim off and discard excess fat. Sprinkle ribs lightly all over with salt and pepper, and place in a single layer, bones down, in a 12-by 17-inch roasting pan. Bake in a 450° regular or convection oven until meat is beginning to brown, 15 to 20 minutes. With tongs, turn ribs. Add onion, carrots, celery, and ginger to pan around ribs, then mix to coat with fat in pan, and spread level. Bake until ribs are well browned and vegetables are beginning to brown, 15 to 20 minutes longer.

Meanwhile, wrap peppercorns, star anise, cinnamon stick, and 2 rosemary sprigs in a double layer of cheesecloth, 10 inches square tie closed with heavy cotton string. To pan, add broth, tangerine juice, port, and spice bundle. Stir gently to mix and scrape browned bits free. Cover pan tightly with foil.

Bake in a 325° regular or convection oven until meat is very tender when pierced, 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Uncover pan and discard spice bundle. With tongs, transfer ribs to a rimmed platter cover and keep warm in a 200° oven. Skim and discard fat from pan juices. Boil over high heat, stirring often, until reduced to 2 1/2 cups, about 10 minutes. Add tangerine slices and cook just until heated through, about 1 minute.

Pour sauce over ribs on platter. Garnish with remaining rosemary sprigs. Add salt and pepper to taste.


Blueberries & Basil

When I first started this blog two years ago (. ), it felt like I was posting a Melissa Clark recipe every other week. I forced myself to take a break for awhile, so that I wouldn’t post every recipe she’s ever written, but tragically that meant that this, my most successful dinner party recipe to date, never made it onto the blog. Since I don’t eat red meat, I can’t tell you from personal experience how delicious these ribs may or may not be. However, I’ve made them a number of times now, and have passed on the recipe to family and friends, each time with rave reviews. Since I cook primarily for the accolades, I make these ribs a lot.

This recipe comes from the January chapter of Cook This Now (Melissa organizes the recipes in this cookbook by month), so I had every intention of posting it two months ago. But as you may have noticed, Blueberries and Basil is off to a slow start this year, so my “January Short Ribs” are a little delayed – I hope you can forgive me. After all, most of the country is still experiencing January weather. And even in the Pacific Northwest, where it feels like May, it turns out short ribs are still well received even when it’s 50 degrees at dinner time.

Many of you are probably familiar with how to braise short ribs – but I really wasn’t, so I was pleasantly surprised to discover how easy it is. it’s the perfect make-ahead meal (dinner party or otherwise) because you can prepare it in advance, pop it in the oven, and not give it a second thought for the next three hours. Simply reduce your port* and wine**, brown your meat, sauté your veggies, dump everything into your Dutch oven and bake (technically braise, I suppose) for three hours while you clean your kitchen, make dessert, take a nap, run errands – you get the idea. Three hours to do whatever you like while a delicious meal comes together in the oven, all on it’s own. *Melissa uses port and wine, but if you don’t feel like buying a bottle of port only to use half a cup, I confess I’ve made them without the port before and haven’t heard any complaints. **The recipe calls for a dry red wine – I googled “dry red wine for short ribs” (because that’s the level of sophistication I have when it comes to using wine in cooking) and found most people recommend a petit syrah, so that’s what I’ve been using, but I think you could use whatever you have on hand.

Meat usually grosses me out, but even I have to admit, they’re kind of pretty. And they make your kitchen smell amazing! The original recipe is technically for oxtails (speaking of being grossed out) rather than short ribs, so Melissa tells you the meat should be “almost” falling off the bone after two and a half hours. I’m assuming the rules for short ribs are different, as mine are usually actually falling off the bone after an hour or so. Again, I don’t eat them so I can’t say for certain, but I’m constantly asking people if they’re overdone and am assured they are perfect. But that said, if you needed to shorten the cooking time a bit I think you’d be ok. The beauty of braising, I’m learning, is that you really can’t go wrong. Bon appétit!

Port Wine-Braised Short Ribs, from Melissa Clark’s Cook This Now

1 (750 ml) bottle dry red wine
1/2 cup ruby port
3 lbs beef short ribs
Kosher salt, for seasoning
Freshly ground black pepper, for seasoning
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
5 shallots, finely chopped
5 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 medium leeks, chopped
1 celery stalk, finely chopped
3 thyme sprigs
2 rosemary sprigs
1 bunch parsley stems (use some of the leaves for garnish, if you like)
2 bay leaves
2 medium carrots, scrubbed and diced small
Balsamic vinegar to taste

1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. In a large saucepan over high heat, bring the wine and port to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer until reduced by half, about 20 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, brown the short ribs. Season them generously with salt and pepper (you will need at least two teaspoons salt and one teaspoon pepper, or possibly more – enough to get the meat well coated). In a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat, melt 1 tablespoon of the butter with the olive oil. Working in batches, arrange the short ribs in a single layer and brown on all sides. Take your time with this and let them get good and brown don’t crowd the pan, or they will steam and never develop that tasty caramelized crust. Transfer the short ribs to a bowl.
3. Melt the remaining tablespoon of butter in the Dutch oven and add the shallots, garlic, leeks, and celery. Cook the vegetables, scraping up the browned bits at the bottom of the pan, until softened, stirring constantly, about 5 minutes.
4. Arrange the short ribs over the vegetables and add the reduced wine-port mixture. Using kitchen twine, tie together the thyme, rosemary, parsley stems, and bay leaves, and drop into the pot. (You can skip the twine and simply drop the herbs into the pot if you don’t have kitchen twine on hand – although it’s a bit of a pain to fish them out before serving). Bring the liquid to a boil on the stovetop, then cover and transfer the Dutch oven to the oven. Cook, turning the ribs occasionally (or not), until the meat is tender but not yet falling off the bone, 2 to 2 1/2 hours (mine always seem to be falling off the bone by the two hour mark, but I give them 2 1/2 regardless if time allows). Add the carrots and cook another 30 minutes.
5. Season with balsamic vinegar and additional salt, if desired. Serve over mashed potatoes and top with parsley.

*If you’re serving the short ribs right away, as I usually am, you can spoon some of the fat off of the surface if it looks a little greasy (mine never seem to). You can also refrigerate and serve the next day in that case the fat is easy to scrape off – although you lose a lot of your vegetables with it.

**In lieu of short ribs, you could use: 4 1/2 pounds oxtail pieces, 4 lamb foreshanks, 2-3 pounds brisket or chuck roast, or 2 pounds boneless beef stew meat.

***In lieu of mashed potatoes, you could serve over polenta, roasted potatoes, roasted root vegetables, or anything else that suits your fancy. You could also serve it on its own, as a simple stew.


Blueberries & Basil

When I first started this blog two years ago (. ), it felt like I was posting a Melissa Clark recipe every other week. I forced myself to take a break for awhile, so that I wouldn’t post every recipe she’s ever written, but tragically that meant that this, my most successful dinner party recipe to date, never made it onto the blog. Since I don’t eat red meat, I can’t tell you from personal experience how delicious these ribs may or may not be. However, I’ve made them a number of times now, and have passed on the recipe to family and friends, each time with rave reviews. Since I cook primarily for the accolades, I make these ribs a lot.

This recipe comes from the January chapter of Cook This Now (Melissa organizes the recipes in this cookbook by month), so I had every intention of posting it two months ago. But as you may have noticed, Blueberries and Basil is off to a slow start this year, so my “January Short Ribs” are a little delayed – I hope you can forgive me. After all, most of the country is still experiencing January weather. And even in the Pacific Northwest, where it feels like May, it turns out short ribs are still well received even when it’s 50 degrees at dinner time.

Many of you are probably familiar with how to braise short ribs – but I really wasn’t, so I was pleasantly surprised to discover how easy it is. it’s the perfect make-ahead meal (dinner party or otherwise) because you can prepare it in advance, pop it in the oven, and not give it a second thought for the next three hours. Simply reduce your port* and wine**, brown your meat, sauté your veggies, dump everything into your Dutch oven and bake (technically braise, I suppose) for three hours while you clean your kitchen, make dessert, take a nap, run errands – you get the idea. Three hours to do whatever you like while a delicious meal comes together in the oven, all on it’s own. *Melissa uses port and wine, but if you don’t feel like buying a bottle of port only to use half a cup, I confess I’ve made them without the port before and haven’t heard any complaints. **The recipe calls for a dry red wine – I googled “dry red wine for short ribs” (because that’s the level of sophistication I have when it comes to using wine in cooking) and found most people recommend a petit syrah, so that’s what I’ve been using, but I think you could use whatever you have on hand.

Meat usually grosses me out, but even I have to admit, they’re kind of pretty. And they make your kitchen smell amazing! The original recipe is technically for oxtails (speaking of being grossed out) rather than short ribs, so Melissa tells you the meat should be “almost” falling off the bone after two and a half hours. I’m assuming the rules for short ribs are different, as mine are usually actually falling off the bone after an hour or so. Again, I don’t eat them so I can’t say for certain, but I’m constantly asking people if they’re overdone and am assured they are perfect. But that said, if you needed to shorten the cooking time a bit I think you’d be ok. The beauty of braising, I’m learning, is that you really can’t go wrong. Bon appétit!

Port Wine-Braised Short Ribs, from Melissa Clark’s Cook This Now

1 (750 ml) bottle dry red wine
1/2 cup ruby port
3 lbs beef short ribs
Kosher salt, for seasoning
Freshly ground black pepper, for seasoning
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
5 shallots, finely chopped
5 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 medium leeks, chopped
1 celery stalk, finely chopped
3 thyme sprigs
2 rosemary sprigs
1 bunch parsley stems (use some of the leaves for garnish, if you like)
2 bay leaves
2 medium carrots, scrubbed and diced small
Balsamic vinegar to taste

1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. In a large saucepan over high heat, bring the wine and port to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer until reduced by half, about 20 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, brown the short ribs. Season them generously with salt and pepper (you will need at least two teaspoons salt and one teaspoon pepper, or possibly more – enough to get the meat well coated). In a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat, melt 1 tablespoon of the butter with the olive oil. Working in batches, arrange the short ribs in a single layer and brown on all sides. Take your time with this and let them get good and brown don’t crowd the pan, or they will steam and never develop that tasty caramelized crust. Transfer the short ribs to a bowl.
3. Melt the remaining tablespoon of butter in the Dutch oven and add the shallots, garlic, leeks, and celery. Cook the vegetables, scraping up the browned bits at the bottom of the pan, until softened, stirring constantly, about 5 minutes.
4. Arrange the short ribs over the vegetables and add the reduced wine-port mixture. Using kitchen twine, tie together the thyme, rosemary, parsley stems, and bay leaves, and drop into the pot. (You can skip the twine and simply drop the herbs into the pot if you don’t have kitchen twine on hand – although it’s a bit of a pain to fish them out before serving). Bring the liquid to a boil on the stovetop, then cover and transfer the Dutch oven to the oven. Cook, turning the ribs occasionally (or not), until the meat is tender but not yet falling off the bone, 2 to 2 1/2 hours (mine always seem to be falling off the bone by the two hour mark, but I give them 2 1/2 regardless if time allows). Add the carrots and cook another 30 minutes.
5. Season with balsamic vinegar and additional salt, if desired. Serve over mashed potatoes and top with parsley.

*If you’re serving the short ribs right away, as I usually am, you can spoon some of the fat off of the surface if it looks a little greasy (mine never seem to). You can also refrigerate and serve the next day in that case the fat is easy to scrape off – although you lose a lot of your vegetables with it.

**In lieu of short ribs, you could use: 4 1/2 pounds oxtail pieces, 4 lamb foreshanks, 2-3 pounds brisket or chuck roast, or 2 pounds boneless beef stew meat.

***In lieu of mashed potatoes, you could serve over polenta, roasted potatoes, roasted root vegetables, or anything else that suits your fancy. You could also serve it on its own, as a simple stew.


Port-braised Short Ribs with Ginger and Star Anise

Rinse ribs and pat dry trim off and discard excess fat. Sprinkle ribs lightly all over with salt and pepper, and place in a single layer, bones down, in a 12x17 inch roasting pan.

Bake in a 450° regular, or convection, oven until meat is beginning to brown, 15 to 20 minutes.

With tongs, turn ribs. Add onion, carrots, celery, and ginger to pan around ribs. Then, mix to coat with fat in pan, and spread level. Bake until ribs are well browned and vegetables are beginning to brown, 15 to 20 minutes longer.

Meanwhile, wrap peppercorns, star anise, cinnamon stick, and rosemary in a double layer of cheesecloth, 10 inches square tie closed with heavy cotton string.

To pan, add broth, tangerine juice, port, and spice bundle. Stir gently to mix and scrape browned bits free from bottom. Cover pan tightly with foil.

Bake in a 325° regular, or convection, oven until meat is very tender when pierced, 2-2 1/2 hours. Uncover pan and discard spice bundle. With tongs, transfer ribs to a rimmed platter cover and keep warm in a 200° oven.

Skim and discard fat from pan juices. Boil over high heat, stirring often, until reduced to 2 1/2 cups, about 10 minutes. Add tangerine slices and cook just until heated through, about 1 minute.

Pour sauce over ribs on platter. Garnish with rosemary. Add salt and pepper to taste.


How to Make It

Rinse ribs and pat dry trim off and discard excess fat. Sprinkle ribs lightly all over with salt and pepper, and place in a single layer, bones down, in a 12-by 17-inch roasting pan. Bake in a 450° regular or convection oven until meat is beginning to brown, 15 to 20 minutes. With tongs, turn ribs. Add onion, carrots, celery, and ginger to pan around ribs, then mix to coat with fat in pan, and spread level. Bake until ribs are well browned and vegetables are beginning to brown, 15 to 20 minutes longer.

Meanwhile, wrap peppercorns, star anise, cinnamon stick, and 2 rosemary sprigs in a double layer of cheesecloth, 10 inches square tie closed with heavy cotton string. To pan, add broth, tangerine juice, port, and spice bundle. Stir gently to mix and scrape browned bits free. Cover pan tightly with foil.

Bake in a 325° regular or convection oven until meat is very tender when pierced, 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Uncover pan and discard spice bundle. With tongs, transfer ribs to a rimmed platter cover and keep warm in a 200° oven. Skim and discard fat from pan juices. Boil over high heat, stirring often, until reduced to 2 1/2 cups, about 10 minutes. Add tangerine slices and cook just until heated through, about 1 minute.

Pour sauce over ribs on platter. Garnish with remaining rosemary sprigs. Add salt and pepper to taste.


Port Braised Short Ribs

  • 4 lbs. Boneless Beef Short Ribs*
  • 1/3 c. Flour
  • 1 Tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 1/2 Diced Pancetta
  • 1 Large Shallot, minced
  • 2-3 Cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1/2 c. Carrot, julienned
  • 2 Tbsp. Celery, minced
  • 2 c. Beef Broth
  • 2 c. Port Wine
  • 2 Sprigs Fresh Rosemary
  • 2-3 Sprigs Fresh Thyme
  • 1 Bay Leaf, whole
  • 3 Tbsp. Tomato Paste
  • Salt and Pepper

Note: Most people make short ribs with bone-in ribs, but I find there is more meat (and less fat) using boneless country ribs. Use whatever you prefer. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Wash and pat dry the ribs, then sprinkle with salt and pepper. Put the flour in a large baggie and add 4-5 ribs to the flour. Close the bag and shake well. Heat the olive oil over medium heat in a large (oven safe) dutch oven for about 3 minutes. Shake off the excess flour from the ribs as you remove from the baggie and add to the stock pot, cooking 3-4 minutes on each side until brown. While these ribs cook, add the remaining ribs to the flour and finish frying the remaining ribs. Be careful not to burn the ribs, but it is okay for them to get good and brown. When the ribs are done

Shake off the excess flour from the ribs as you remove from the baggie and add to the stock pot, cooking 3-4 minutes on each side until brown. While these ribs cook, add the remaining ribs to the flour and finish frying the remaining ribs. Be careful not to burn the ribs, but it is okay for them to get good and brown. When the ribs are done cooking, remove from the pan and set aside. The ribs will not be completely cooked at this point in time, just browned on the outside with a nice crust. The ribs should have created some drippings in the pan remove all but about 2 Tbsp of the drippings. Add the pancetta and fry 2-3 minutes, then add the shallot, garlic, carrot, and celery and saute until browned.

The vegetables and pancetta should get a little bit crispy, but not burnt. Add the beef broth a little at a time, scraping up the crusted flour, vegetables, pancetta, and drippings off the bottom of the pan into the broth. Add the port wine, fresh herbs, and tomato paste and stir well. Slowly add the ribs, making sure the sauce covers most of the ribs. Place the dutch oven in the heated oven with the lid on and roast the ribs for about 3 hours. (Your house will smell heavenly while they roast.) Serve the Port Braised Short Ribs over mashed potatoes or egg noodles.


  • 4 cups red wine
  • 1 cup ruby port wine
  • 4 bone-in 2-inch-thick short ribs
  • Salt
  • Cracked black pepper
  • Flour for dusting
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, cut into small dice
  • 2 carrots, cut into small dice
  • 1 rib celery, cut into small dice
  • 4 large shallots, peeled and split
  • 1 small leek, white and light green parts only, diced and rinsed
  • 1 head garlic, halved
  • 4 sprigs thyme
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 1/2 quarts veal, beef, or chicken stock

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees. Pour the red wine and port into a large saucepan and boil until it reduces by half.

Pat the short ribs dry with paper towels, season them on all sides with salt and pepper, and dust them lightly with flour. Heat the olive oil over medium-high heat in a large heavy-bottomed Dutch oven. Sear the short ribs evenly on all sides, 3 to 4 minutes per side, until well browned (you may need to do this in batches). Remove the short ribs from the pan and set aside.

Lower the heat to medium, remove all but 2 tablespoons fat from the pan, and add the onion, carrots, celery, shallots, leek, garlic, and thyme. Cook for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned. Stir in the tomato paste and continue to cook for another 2 to 3 minutes.

Add the reduced wine, browned ribs, and stock to the pot. Bring to a boil, cover tightly, and transfer to the oven to braise for 3 to 3 1/2 hours, or until the ribs are fork-tender.

Remove the pot from the oven and cool at room temperature for 20 minutes. Gently scoop the ribs from the pot and pull out their bones and tendons, being careful not to shred the meat. Return the ribs to the sauce and refrigerate overnight.

The next day, scoop out and discard any fat that has risen to the surface of the sauce. Remove the ribs, trim any remaining cartilage, and transfer to a heatproof dish. Heat the sauce, then strain through a fine-meshed sieve into a clean saucepan. Reduce to a consistency thick enough to coat the back of a spoon and pour over the ribs. (At this point, the ribs and sauce can be reserved, refrigerated, for up to 4 days.)

When ready to serve, place the covered dish in a preheated 325 degree oven and cook, occasionally basting the meat with the sauce, until heated through, about 30 minutes.


Dining Tip: Port-Braised Short Ribs with Cabernet

• 3 tablespoons grapeseed oil
• 1 large six-bone section flanken-style short ribs (about 3 1/2 pounds)
• Fleur de sel, to taste
• 2 tablespoons tomato paste
• 5 whole garlic cloves, peeled
• 2 whole shallots, sliced
• 1 cup peeled, chopped carrots
• 1 cup chopped celery
• 1 cup Port wine
• 5 cups beef broth
• 1 can Dr Pepper (1 1/2 cups)
• 3 cups heavy cream
• 1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns
• 1/2 cup grated fresh horseradish root

1. Heat a pan on low. Toast the peppercorns for 2 to 4 minutes, then process in a spice grinder.

2. In a small saucepot, combine cream, ground pepper and grated horseradish. Turn heat to medium. When cream begins to simmer, transfer to a nonreactive bowl. Let cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate 6 hours or overnight. Transfer to a chilled mixing bowl. In a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip to stiff peaks. Chill until ready to serve.

3. Preheat the oven to 250° F, with a rack in the lower third. Add oil to a large braising pan or Dutch oven and set over medium heat. (Cut rib rack in half if needed to fit in pan.) Season ribs with fleur de sel. Sear ribs, fatty side down, until well-browned, about 5 minutes. Remove ribs, leaving any pan drippings, and add tomato paste, garlic, shallot, carrot and celery. Cook for 5 to 10 minutes, or until vegetables are lightly browned. Return ribs to pan, seared side up. Add Port, beef broth and Dr Pepper to cover meat halfway (you may not use all liquid), and bring to a simmer.

4. Cover pan with a tight-fitting lid or wrap entire pan in aluminum foil, and braise until fork-tender and falling off the bone, 3 1/2 to 4 hours. Let rest for a half hour in the pan. (Ribs can be made ahead and reheated in a 250° F oven for 1 hour.)

5. Transfer ribs to a cutting board and cover tightly with aluminum foil. Strain braising liquid into a saucepan and heat over medium. Cook until thickened, about 15 to 20 minutes.

6. Cut ribs into 6 pieces. Serve each with some sauce and a small ramekin of horseradish cream. Serves 6.

Recommended wine pairings

Chef's pick: O'Shaughnessy Cabernet Sauvignon Howell Mountain 2015


Port-Braised Beef Short Ribs (Instant Pot)

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup pastured-raised beef broth
1 onion, cut in quarters and thinly sliced
1 carrot, cut into 1-inch chunks
4—5 large cloves garlic, peeled
5-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch slices
1 five-inch-long strip of orange zest
3/4 cup ruby port
1/2 teaspoon glucomannan powder, if needed for thickening
For Serving: 1/4 cup chopped fresh herbs (chives, basil, parsley, or tarragon)

Mix all rub ingredients in a small bowl. On a baking sheet, lay out the short ribs, then sprinkle the rub—rubbing in—turning each piece to cover all meaty sides. Place in a big bowl, cover and refrigerate for at least an hour (overnight is best).

Heat the olive oil over high heat in a large skillet (or inside the Instant Pot, using the sauté function). Brown the ribs on all sides.

Reduce the heat, deglaze the pan with the broth, and add all the vegetables, garlic, and ginger to the pan. Cook for a few minutes.

Tuck the ribs into the Instant Pot, add the orange peel, port, and the broth—vegetable mixture. Cover—making sure the steam release knob is in the “sealing” position—and cook on high pressure for 45 minutes. Allow the pressure to release naturally. This can take 45 or minutes or more.

Transfer the ribs to a large bowl, discard carrot, onion, ginger, garlic, and orange pieces, and turn the Instant Pot’s sauté function on, and reduce the liquid until thickened. Add 1 teaspoon (or less) of glucomannan powder if more thickening is needed. First whisk the powder into a little cold water (or other cold liquid), then slowly whisk this into the short rib liquid. Pour the sauce over the ribs and serve, garnished with your choice of fresh herbs.

Alternate cooking method: Slow cooker on high for 5—7 hours, or low for 8—10 hours.