Traditional recipes

Italian-American Cooking: Tips From the Pros

Italian-American Cooking: Tips From the Pros

If you believe that great food and quality family time go hand-in-hand, then you probably already know Francis Garcia and Sal Basille, the geniuses behind the amazingly delicious Artichoke Pizza and authors of Staten Italy: Nothin’ But The Best Italian-American Classics, from Our Block To Yours. Staten Italy is a book about good food and good family; Francis and Sal open the doors to their homes and welcome you to their dinner tables to share laughter, tears, and heartwarming stories of the past — and, of course, really delicious recipes like their Stuffed Artichokes.

Want to know more about Italian-American cooking? Here’s what the pros have to say:

You emphasize that your food is Italian-American. Can you talk a little bit about how that differs from traditional Italian fare?
Italian-American is what we grew up eating. Things like chicken parm and baked ziti. If you go to Italy and ask for chicken parm, they'll think you're nuts; it's cuisine that's indigenous to New York City. Or spaghetti and meatballs — some Italian living in New York (probably our grandfather and his friend Joe) decided to put the spaghetti with the meatballs. That’s what we consider Italian-American.

What are some of the biggest influences on your food?
Family, the New York restaurant business, emotions, and holidays.

If someone wants to cook Italian-American at home, what are a few of the things she or he should have on hand?
Olive oil, pecorino, garlic, breadcrumbs, parsley, basil, Ronzoni pasta, and a can of good tomatoes.

Any specific cooking techniques that you rely on for Italian-American fare?
Pan fry everything, don't be scared to use a lot of salt, brown the garlic so you don't get agita (indigestion), and burn your pizza. Good background music is especially important, too.

Good news — Francis and Sal love New York City (and say they aren’t finished building here yet) and have just opened up another Artichoke Pizza location. It’s in Astoria, underneath the tracks at the Astoria-Ditmars stop.

Want even more from Artichoke Pizza?
Share images from your next homemade Italian-American feast by April 6, 2015, and tag #StatenItaly on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to be entered for a chance to make pizza with the Cooking Channel’s own Pizza Masters, and invite up to three friends for dinner at Artichoke Basille's Pizza!

And if you order a copy of Staten Italy and submit proof of purchase to this link, Fran and Sal will share bonus recipes (which are insanely good).

Kristie Collado is The Daily Meal’s Cook Editor. Follow her on Twitter @KColladoCook.


11 Cooking Tips Pro Chefs Swear By (and You Should Too)

Add seasoning as you cook. Don&rsquot overcrowd the pan. Resist the urge to slice into cooked meat before it rests. If you&rsquore as obsessed with the Food Network as we are (*praise hands emoji* to Ina Garten), chances are you&rsquove heard these cooking tips before. They&rsquore some of the simplest ways to make your food taste more delicious with little effort.

And chefs have tons of these tips they use every single day&mdashthat most of us non-culinary experts have zero clue about (surprise, surprise) but can easily start trying in our own kitchens. Like now.

1. Use an extra baking sheet for even heating.

Home ovens tend to heat hotter from either the top or the bottom. Good news: It&rsquos not just because your oven is from the 1950s. You&rsquoll know if the bottom is hotter, for instance, if you&rsquove noticed cookies getting dark on the bottom, while the top stays pale (or vice versa). To fix this, try putting an empty baking sheet on the shelf either above or below the item you&rsquore baking&mdashwhichever is hotter. This will absorb some of the heat and help things bake or roast more evenly.

-Tiffany MacIsaac, owner and pastry chef at Buttercream Bakeshop in Washington, D.C.

Chop garlic before you prep any other ingredients. It takes at least 10 minutes for the allicin (garlic&rsquos main antioxidant compound) to release and be beneficial to the body. If you&rsquore cooking the garlic, pour the oil you&rsquoll use for cooking on top of the chopped garlic in a small bowl, and let it sit while you do your other prep work. Then when you put the oil in the pan, you&rsquoll have garlic-infused oil that creates multiple dimensions of garlicky flavor in your dish.

-Ariane Resnick, certified clinical nutritionist and author ofThe Bone Broth Miracle

3. Add soy sauce to your barbecue.

Soy sauce: It&rsquos not just for dunking sushi. It&rsquos actually in some of the best barbecue sauces, because it gives depth of flavor and umami to meats. Dark soy sauce is ideal for cooking, sauces, and marinades because it has a robust flavor, intense color, and a lower salt content than light versions. Look for a naturally brewed option (the flavor is more complex than chemically brewed ones) like Sushi Chef Dark Soy Sauce.

-Thomas Boemer, chef at Revival and Corner Table in Minneapolis

Adding extra seasoning to butter adds a flavor that you wouldn&rsquot get with plain butter&mdashso you can use less overall (even though we know that third tablespoon is tempting). Thyme, garlic, and lemon zest are solid choices to add (this does wonders for meat). You taste it, but it&rsquos subtle. To make it: Heat butter in a saucepan until foaming, then remove butter from heat and add your herbs or flavorings. Let sit for a minute, then strain and refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 3 weeks.

-James Lintelmann, chef at Baptiste & Bottle in Chicago

5. If you love Greek yogurt, try labneh.

You probably know that you can replace higher-fat ingredients such as sour cream, mayonnaise, and butter with Greek yogurt. While it works well, labneh is even better. A strained yogurt cheese that&rsquos thicker and creamier than Greek yogurt, labneh can even be used in place of butter in baking. It adds flavor, moisture, and brings a lightness to enhance any dish.

-Brandon Shapiro, chef de cuisine at Wildwood Kitchen in Washington, D.C.

A sprinkle of sea salt doesn&rsquot just make food more flavorful. It also intensifies the flavor of hot tea or coffee, bringing out subtle flavors that you might have missed in your previous cup of joe. It also neutralizes any bitterness. Next time you think about adding a teaspoon of sugar, try a touch of salt first, and see how much the flavor jumps.

-Stefan Pickerel, corporate chef for The Spice & Tea Exchange

7. Swap cream for cauliflower.

Cauliflower is good for more than just making low-carb rice. When steamed then puréed, it&rsquos also a great way to add richness and body to anything that would benefit from a creamy texture&mdashthink risotto or &ldquocreamed&rdquo spinach. It&rsquos not just lighter than the heavy cream, but it also offers extra nutrients and fiber.

-Sascha Weiss, head of menu and product development for Project Juice

Make vinegar your friend (if you haven&rsquot already&hellip we see you, ACV drinkers). It&rsquos a light and refreshing way to make an average dish taste way better in less than a minute. Add a splash of red wine vinegar to braised meats at the end of cooking to brighten the flavors. If a soup tastes too salty, a bit of balsamic vinegar can help bring balance.

-Nick Melvin, executive chef at Venkman&rsquos in Atlanta

9. Try venison in place of beef.

When you can find it, replace beef with venison. It has the same amount of protein as beef and about 1/5 of the fat&mdasheven less than skinless chicken breast but with much more flavor (TBH). Opt for a premium cut (loin, rack, or tenderloin), use a very hot pan or grill, and cook it to medium rare to retain moisture and flavor. And always look for grass-fed venison raised without hormones or steroids when available.

-Brad Famerie, executive chef at PUBLIC and Saxon + Parole in New York City

Homemade turmeric oil adds earthy flavor (and health benefits) to roasted vegetables, fingerling potatoes, and salad dressings. And it&rsquos easy to make: Combine 1 cup coconut oil and a 1-inch piece of fresh turmeric in a small saucepan and simmer over medium-low heat for 30 minutes, or until the oil has a deep orange color. Cool the oil to room temperature, strain it, and refrigerate in an airtight container or jar for up to a week.

-Marilyn Schlossbach, owner of Langosta Lounge in Asbury Park, New Jersey

11. Add most of your fat at the end of cooking.

A tablespoon of butter or oil added at the end of cooking will add more flavor than 4 or 5 tablespoons added at the start of the cooking process. When you add fat at the end, it rests on the surface of the food instead of melding or combining with your ingredients. Fat on the surface transfers directly to your tongue, giving your taste buds something to be happy about. And isn&rsquot that what we&rsquore all striving for in life the kitchen?


Use Ingredients in New Ways

“Try a seasonal ingredient in an unexpected way! If you have never tried juicing a sweet potato you will be pleasantly surprised. The starch in potato makes your drinks lightly creamy, and the flavor combination is perfectly sweet. This is a dessert vegetable juice, packed full of vitamins A and B complex and beta-carotene.” –Matthew Kenney, raw food chef and owner of Plant Food + Wine Miami


Fair warning: This dish requires hours on the stovetop. But the result—tender and juicy meat, a thick and intense sauce—is beyond worth waiting for. Standard top round beef gets fortified with flavorful pancetta, Pecorino Romano, and garlic before getting slowly simmered with meatballs and homemade tomato sauce.

Sunday Ragù

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From the Test Kitchen

Season 1

No tailgating party is complete without Buffalo wings. Two key steps ensure extra-crisp wings: letting them sit at room temperature evens the cooking time, and the cornstarch dredge transforms into a crunchy shell when fried. If you like your wing sauce super spicy, increase the amount of cayenne.

This sauce is an ode to the classic French dish of leeks in vinaigrette, swapping out the leeks for tender charred scallions. It acts as a bright, addictive condiment for this quick-cooking cut of steak. If you can’t find hanger steak, skirt steak works for this recipe—adjust cook time accordingly. The sauce also pairs well with roast chicken, pork chops. we could do this all day. Get the recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/hanger-steak-with-charred-scallion-sauce

To make this tomato-on-bread revelation right this very minute, use a prepared flatbread like naan or pocketless pita. Get the recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/falafel-spiced-tomatoes-and-chickpeas-on-flatbread

Join Amiel Stanek in his home kitchen as he makes doughnut bread pudding. This recipe is a great way to use up stale doughnuts, but if you’ve got freshly made ones, that works too. Start with classic glazed or sugar-coated yeasted doughnuts, which have a light and airy texture, rather than cake doughnuts, which are dense and will turn to mush when combined with the custard.

Join Brad Leone in his backyard as he makes pork chops, flat bread and some vegetable slaw on the side. He uses an outdoor flattop propane burner, but you can use a cast iron skillet if you don't have one of those (and let's be real, who does other than Brad?).

Presented by Bright Cellars | Join Chris Morocco in his home test kitchen as he makes red wine and soy-braised short ribs. These richly flavored ribs are a riff on kalbi jjim, a traditional special-occasion dish. Red wine adds depth and complements the soy and mirin. Chris received this wine from Bright Cellars - go to https://www.brightcellars.com/bonappetit/ for 50% off your first order.

Join Carla Lalli Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes broccoli delight. What is broccoli delight, you ask? Why, it's what happens when the stars align and a smattering of seemingly unconnected ingredients find unity in the confines of a pan. And if that doesn't make sense to you, basically it's melty, cheesy sautéed broccoli with chili flakes and lemon.

Join Sohla El-Waylly in her home test kitchen as she makes lamb & scallion dumplings. To quote Sohla: "Once you learn how to make a dumpling, you can dump anything." Her words, but truly words to live by.

Join Claire Saffitz in her home kitchen as she makes three types of homemade pasta from scratch: ravioli, agnolotti and mezzaluna. She shows you each step in the pasta making process, from making the pasta dough and ricotta filling to cooking it all up. Check out Claire's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/csaffitz/

Join Molly Baz in her home Test Kitchen as she makes sour cream and onion biscuits. If you've ever had trouble making biscuits in the past, consider this recipe your saving grace. While many other methods count on pockets of butter and an angel’s touch for pull-apart flakiness, we weren't willing to leave it to chance. Our simple folding technique manually multiplies the number of layers for guaranteed, no-risk success. And the sour cream isn’t just a gimmick.

Join Sohla El-Waylly in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes cinnamon-date sticky buns. Instead of the usual brown sugar and butter filling, the fluffy buttermilk-laced buns are filled with a cinnamon-scented date purée. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/cinnamon-date-sticky-buns Filmed on 2/18/20.

Join Andy Baraghani in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes Neapolitan chicken. The famous Neapolitan tomato sauce—packed with olives, garlic, capers, and anchovies—is traditionally paired with long pasta. In our version, chicken legs are gently oven-braised in the puttanesca until it's nearly falling off the bone. It’s a low-maintenance, one-skillet dish that is easy to pull off on a weeknight. Filmed on 1/13/20.

Join Molly Baz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes roast chicken and potatoes.This isn’t the crisp-skinned, high-heat roast chicken you’re probably familiar with. Instead, it’s a melt-in-your-mouth tender, schmaltzy, slow-roast version that’s more similar to rotisserie chicken—except (bonus!) it gets slathered in the funky-spicy-sweet gochujang. Filmed on November 4, 2019.

Join Andy Baraghani in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes pasta with tomatoes and chickpeas. If you don't have a can of tomatoes, tomato paste will work just fine. Cook a couple of tablespoons in a small skillet alongside the chickpeas until it darkens before adding to the chickpeas and proceeding with the recipe. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/brothy-pasta-with-chickpeas

Join Carla Lalli Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes 30 minute skillet chicken. Butterflying and flattening the bird might feel like chicken chiropractory, but it’s all in the name of crisp golden chicken skin, and what more noble cause could there be? Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/chicken-under-a-skillet-with-lemon-pan-sauce Check out Carla's Instagram: @lallimusic

Join Priya Krishna in the Bon Appétit Test kitchen as she makes Kadhi. Kadhi is similar in texture to cream of [fill in the blank] soup, but with no cream, and…well…better. All you need to make it are yogurt, chickpea flour, and spices. Check out the recipe here: https://bonappetit.com/recipe/kadhi-turmeric-yogurt-soup

Join Rick Martinez as he makes Tacos Placeros. This time we're stepping out of the Test Kitchen as Rick takes us to Queens to find the best Tacos Placeros in New York City. Tacos Placeros are giant plate-size tacos that have a little bit of everything in them, depending on what's available! They can include various meats, but these particular tacos feature deep-fried, stuffed chiles rellenos. Check out our feature 'Taco Nation' here: https://www.bonappetit.com/story/taco-nation

Presented by Method | Join Molly Baz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes classic chicken noodle soup. This version is about as classic (and as comforting) as they come, using a whole chicken—bones, skin, and all—to lend flavor and body to the broth. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/classic-chicken-noodle-soup

Join Chris Morocco in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes healthy breakfast sandwiches. You may not mistake these jammy-crisp, slow-cooked onions for bacon, but they are truly exceptional as a stand-in, giving a huge blast of umami to create a truly satisfying breakfast sandwich. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/breakfast-sandwiches-onion-bacon

Join Hawa Hassan in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes Lahoh, Somali pancakes. Lahoh is one of the most common breakfast dishes in Somalia, but unlike other pancakes, these guys go through 2 hours of fermentation before cooking.

Join Andy Baraghani in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes braised short ribs with squash and chile. Make this when it’s Sunday and you’re not leaving the house. One spoonful of this smoky-spicy guajillo braising liquid and you’ll understand how complex dried chiles can be. Check out the article here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/braised-short-ribs-with-squash-and-chile

Join Chris Morocco in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes BA's best lasagna. Why in the world would we tell you to make meatballs, brown them, and then break them into pieces—for a ragù? Sounds crazy, but it’s the best way we found to sear a big batch of meat without overcooking it. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/ba-best-lasagna

Join Hawa Hassan in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes suugo suqaar, a Somali pasta recipe. This Italian-influenced, yet distinctly Somali pasta recipe is one of the most common (and delicious) dishes in Somalia. Bonus points if you serve it with a banana.

Join Andy Baraghani in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he prepares turmeric salmon with coconut. The coconut crisp brings texture and heat to this simple stewy dish. Make a double or triple batch and use it as a topping for savory oatmeal, hearty soups, or roasted winter vegetables.

Join Carla Lalli Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes the perfect pot of beans. After enjoying some of the best ones she'd ever had at Marlow & Sons in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Carla reached out to chef Patch Troffer to learn just what kind of magic he was conjuring. Armed with her new legume knowledge, Carla is eager to share.

Join Chris Morocco in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes pasta with kale pesto. Substitute pine nuts for the walnuts if you'd like. To serve with pasta, stir in ½ cup pasta cooking liquid to the pesto until smooth and toss to coat, or serve as a topping for chicken. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/kale-pesto-with-whole-wheat-pasta

Join Rick Martinez in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes apple cider doughnuts. These sugared doughnuts are craggy and crunchy on the outside, tender and moist on the inside. Apple butter (not sauce!) is key to their texture and flavor look for it alongside jams and jellies in the supermarket, or at farmers’ markets, or make your own. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/bas-best-apple-cider-doughnuts

Join Chris Morocco in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes easy chocolate cake. If you've got a bowl, a cheap hand mixer, and a couple of measuring cups, you can make this rich, chocolatey cake. You can pre-mix batches of the dry ingredients together, store them in airtight containers for up to three months, and be ready to celebrate at a moments notice with your own DIY cake mix. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/easiest-chocolate-birthday-cake

Join Rick Martinez in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes tie-dye swirl holiday cookies. The butter cookie that acts as your canvas is extremely simple to make (like, six ingredients simple), so you can spend most of your time on the fun part: unleashing your inner artiste. When you’re decorating, no need to panic if your first attempts don’t work out. Simply wipe off the failed glaze, let the cookie dry for about five minutes, and try again.

Join Sohla El-Waylly in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes red lentil zucchini. These crispy, crackly zucchini fritters take inspiration from the traditional Bengali onion snacks piyaju. Soaked and blended red lentils make up the batter, which is spiked with turmeric and chili powder. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/zucchini-lentil-fritters-with-lemony-yogurt

Join Priya Krishna in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes garlic ginger chicken. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/garlic-ginger-chicken-with-cilantro-and-mint Read the story about Priya's secret ingredient, amchur: https://bonappetit.com/story/amchur-powder-chicken-recipe

Sponsored by Swanson | Join Carla Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes Thanksgiving stuffing. This easy stuffing recipe, or dressing if you prefer, will be a staple on your Thanksgiving dinner menu for years to come. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/simple-is-best-dressing

Join Rick Martinez in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes pork tamales. You can make masa, a dough made from ground corn, in two ways: instant and fresh. Fresh yielded the best corn flavor and best texture, but you can use corn masa flour too, which is easier to find. You can find fresh masa and dried corn husks at tortilla stores/factories, international sections at larger stores, or online. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/pork-tamales-rojas

Join Priya Krishna in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes potato pepper sabzi. The classic Indian marriage of snappy, sweet red peppers and crisped potatoes gets a jolt of flavor from crushed peanuts, toasted cumin and fennel seeds, and a spritz (or more!) of lime juice. Check out the recipe here: https://bonappetit.com/recipe/red-pepper-potato-and-peanut-sabzi

Join Carla Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes spiced roasted pork with chili paste. This recipe is from chef Vivek Surti of Tailor in Nashville, No. 7 on our 2019 Hot Ten list. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/spiced-roast-pork-with-fennel-and-apple-salad

Join Andy Baraghani in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes BA's very best pesto. The key for this classic pesto recipe is to add the basil at the very end instead of blending everything all at once. That way the basil doesn’t get bruised or lose its flavor and maintains its vibrant green color. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/best-pesto

In this very special edition of From OUTSIDE the Test Kitchen, Christina Chaey heads to Kopitiam to learn how to make Nasi Lemak, a Malaysian dish of coconut rice topped with crispy anchovies in a sambal sauce. With the guidance of the restaurant's head chef Kyo Pang and GM Moonlynn Tsai, Christina learns how to make this incredible dish from one of Bon Appétit's Hot 10 restaurants. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/nasi-lemak

Join Brad Leone in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes what he calls "poor man's steak and eggs." Brad actually uses ground beef instead of steak in this recipe, but you can use just about anything, like pork or sausage.

Join Molly Baz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes coconut grilled chicken, skirt steak and shrimp. Welcome to your newest go-to summer marinade, featuring some spicy sambal, brown sugar and coconut milk to balance out the heat, and lots of fresh ginger and lime juice. This one’s just as awesome with shrimp or flank or skirt steak as it is with chicken thighs. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/spicy-coconut-grilled-chicken-thighs

Presented by Grey Goose. Join Rick Martinez in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes apple pie. This is Rick's favorite pie recipe, which may have something to do with the butter and vodka crust.

Presented by Rioja Join Andy Baraghani in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes skirt steak with Romesco sauce. This thick Spanish sauce, made with roasted red peppers and almonds, is also delicious on grilled or roasted scallions, chicken, and fish.

Join Chris Morocco in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes lentil veggie burgers. Everyone questioned why the world needed another veggie burger recipe until they saw how easy and Monday-nightable this one is. You can even make the patties four days ahead to cut down on your day-of prep time. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/healthyish-lentil-burgers

Join Carla Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes absolutely gigantic blueberry pancakes. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/giant-no-flip-blueberry-pancake

Watch your fingers. In this episode, Brad, Molly, Priya, Gaby, Andy, Amiel and Chris put their knife skills to the test in a timed challenge. The challenge: 1. Mince the garlic 2. Macédoine the sweet potato 3. Julienne the jicama Which of our beloved Test Kitchen chefs will prevail?

Join Bon Appétit cover-star Andy Baraghani in the Test Kitchen as he makes grilled scallops with nori, ginger and lime. We always seek out dry scallops, which will sear and caramelize better. Ask your fishmonger before you buy—it really makes a difference. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/grilled-scallops-with-nori-ginger-and-lime

Join Bon Appétit guest Hawa Hassan in the Test Kitchen as she makes digaag qumbe. Warming cumin, cardamom, turmeric, and ginger make this Somali chicken stew recipe a rich aromatic experience. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/digaag-qumbe-yogurt-coconut-chicken And check out Hawa's hot sauce here: https://basbaassauce.com/

Join Rick Martinez in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes adult spaghettiOs. These are extra saucy and a little sweet like the original SpaghettiOs, but with grown-up flavors all around. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/adult-spaghettios

Join Carla Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes corn chowder. To make this recipe vegetarian, omit the bacon and replace with more shiitake mushrooms sauté them until they’re golden brown. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/creamy-corn-chowder

Join Andy Baraghani in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes chicken skewers with garlic toum. Toum, an intense garlic sauce usually paired with shawarma, is used as both a marinade and a condiment in this chicken dish. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/grilled-chicken-skewers-with-toum-shish-taouk

Join Gaby Melian in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes empanadas. Gaby is from Buenos Aires and was taught as a little girl by family members how to make them. After years of perfecting, she’s found she loves both baked and fried empanadas. Here, she makes empanadas with ham and cheese—for more options, see the recipe below! https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/ham-cheese-and-onion-empanadas

Join Molly Baz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she make Basically's strawberry shortcake with cream. Strawberries are a classic choice for this summertime dessert, but if there are other fresh berries out there callin’ your name, by all means, use those instead. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/basically-strawberry-shortcakes

Join Claire Saffitz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes angel food cake. Remember 1997? So does Claire Saffitz, and that's why she's here to RESCUE angel food cake. Too sweet? Too spongy? Too grandmotherly? Watch as Claire takes on all those negative connotations, and spins together a delicious dish that's sure to make you rethink your tired take on angel food cake. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/bas-best-angel-food-cake

Everybody put their hands together for Christina Chaey as she makes her From the Test Kitchen debut. In her first episode, Christina makes a cold buckwheat noodle dish with kimchi and jammy eggs.

Join Claire Saffitz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes cherry cobbler. Why choose between shortcakes and cobbler when you can have one dessert that combines the best of both? The lemony cherry filling is topped with shortcake-inspired cream biscuits (so tender, so light!) that soak up all of those fruit juices without getting soggy. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/cherry-biscuit-cobbler

Join Carla Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she make coffee crème caramel. The flavor inspiration for this recipe was Häagen-Dazs coffee ice cream mixed with burned caramel. Baking the crème caramel in a water bath is key for achieving that barely set, dense, and luscious consistency. And the lemon juice will help prevent your caramel from crystallizing. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/coffee-creme-caramel

Join Rick Martinez in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes chicken scarpariello. Chicken Scarpariello is a classic Italian-American recipe with juicy chicken thighs, sweet Italian sausage, and a vinegary, sweet-sour pan sauce. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/chicken-scarpariello

Join Rick Martinez in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes pozole verde with chicken, a Mexican stew that features pozole corn. We like toasting the canned hominy to concentrate and develop its flavor, but if that’s one step too many, it will still be awesome!

Join Carla Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes a grandma-style sheet pan pizza. If you prefer a spicy pie, use twice as much hot soppressata and none of the sweet type. Check out the dough recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/grandma-style-pizza-dough Check out the soppressata pizza recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/hot-and-sweet-soppressata-and-fennel-grandma-pie

Join Carla Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes BA's best banana bread. Here at BA everybody has their favorite banana bread recipe. We made every one—14 to be exact—until we came up with a collective favorite. Dark brown sugar is key and a dollop of mascarpone makes for superior tenderness. Walnuts optional but encouraged. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/banana-bread

Join Rick Martinez in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes pupusas filled with refried red beans and cheese. Once you taste this classic Salvadoran dish, you’ll definitely want to experiment with the fillings -- carnitas, beef, anything (but not literally anything)! Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/pupusas

Join Carla Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes pork shoulder steaks. The centerpiece of Korean barbecue is the meat, but it doesn't have to be steak. Keep an eye on the edge of the meat where it touches the grill: When it’s browned, turn the pork over. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/gochujang-pork-shoulder-steaks

Join Chris Morocco in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes lemony glazed yonuts (yes, that’s a Greek yogurt doughnut). We set out to make a Greek doughnut, we really did. We tried and we tried, and when it wasn’t working, we switched to Greek yogurt. Adding yogurt to the batter for these cake doughnuts made them light, tangy, and rich, and gave us a dough that was easy to work with. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/lemony-glazed-cake-doughnuts

Join Molly Baz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes crispy smashed potatoes. A condiment made up of walnuts, anchovies, garlic, and red pepper flakes is the ultimate umami bomb, which is then spooned over the crispiest-ever smashed potatoes. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/crispy-smashed-potatoes-with-walnut-dressing

Join Priya Krishna in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes her mom's roasted cauliflower and potato aloo gobi. Too often aloo gobi is mushy or greasy. Here’s how to make crisp, crunchy, cumin-coated morsels of cauliflower and potato. Check out the recipe here: https://bonappetit.com/recipe/roasted-aloo-gobi-potatoes-and-cauliflower And read the story here: https://bonappetit.com/story/roasted-aloo-gobi

Join Chris Morocco in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes chocolate chip cookies. The addition of browned butter really puts these cookies over the top. It makes them crispy-edged, chewy-centered, yet still rooted in classic cookie flavor. Oh, and no mixer required, so there’s no excuse not to make them. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/bas-best-chocolate-chip-cookies

Join Rick Martinez in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes Chili Colorado. What is Chili Colorado, you ask? It’s a traditional Mexican dish of beef or pork stewed in a red chili sauce—chili “colored red,” not chili from the state of Colorado. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/article/groat-ricks-chili-colorado

Join Andy in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes BA's very best bolognese. It doesn’t take a lot of ingredients (or a lot of money) to make a classic Bolognese recipe. What it does take, though, is patience for the sauce to achieve the ideal authentic texture. You’re going to go low and slow—it’ll take around 3 hours, but most of that cook time is hands-off. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/bas-best-bolognese

Join Carla in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes pasta with white pesto. This is the direct inverse of the normal basil pesto you know and love. It’s built on a combination of toasted nuts, creamy ricotta, and salty Parmesan, with a little kick coming from raw garlic and fresh oregano. You don’t need a food processor, a mortar and pestle, or a blender—in fact, the entire sauce comes together in the same bowl you can use for serving.

Join Priya in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes chile peanut rice. This dish uses leftover rice, earthy fried mustard seeds and curry leaves, almost-caramelized onions for a touch of sweetness, crunchy-toasty peanuts, and Indian green chile for some heat. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/story/indian-ish-chile-peanut-rice

Welcome to Brad's World. Join Brad Leone in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes grilled (and stuffed!) squid. These squid tubes are stuffed with tentacles, shrimp, scallions, garlic, ginger, spices and rice are dry rubbed with mustard powder, onion powder, salt & pepper, cayenne and coriander.

Join Rick Martinez in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes blackout cake! According to legend (a.k.a. the Internet), this decadent chocolate cake was first created by Ebinger’s bakery in Brooklyn, New York, and named after the blackout drills during World War II. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/blackout-cake

Join Gaby in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes Tortilla de Papas. Salting the potatoes ahead of time draws out some of their liquid and guarantees they’re well seasoned, but skip this step if you want some of that moisture when you take a bite! Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/tortilla-de-patatas

Brining these pork chops makes them moist, tender, and seasoned throughout, and the sugar helps create a dark, caramelized sheen.

Real alfredo should never (never!) include cream the silky sauce is the result of an emulsion between the grated cheese, melted butter, and starchy pasta water. This is part of BA's Best, a collection of our essential recipes.

The building block of breakfast (and so much more) deserves to be celebrated constantly. We're doing it with all of the egg recipes, techniques, videos, and tips you need to take your egg status from amateur admirer to professional fanatic.

Loving meatballs has never been this rewarding. They’re gilded with lots of strong spices and set in a cooling swoosh of yogurt and anointed with the sweet brightness of a mint pesto. Sound fancy? Not really. We use ground lamb, which is naturally fatty and can be baked without sacrificing juiciness or a charred crust. Get the recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/spicy-lamb-meatballs-with-raisin-pesto

Ideally, you’d make the chile oil with a mix of dried chiles. If you can’t find the two listed, ancho, gochugaru, or even black pepper will work. Get the recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/steak-short-ribs-with-crispy-garlic-and-chile-oil

The sauce is bright yellow from fresh eggs, and each bucatini hides cubes of fatty guanciale. This yolk-heavy recipe is beyond creamy—without cream!—with black peppercorns. It's unlike any clumpy carbonaras you've had. The tricks? Omitting most of the egg whites their water thins the sauce. It's a pasta worth mastering. Get the recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/the-silkiest-carbonara

We urge you: don’t skip the marinade step—it really gives the shrimp lots of garlicky flavor and sets this apart from other scampi recipes. Get the recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/shrimp-scampi

This dish is for when a 3 p.m. hang turns into a dinner party or when you’ve had too long of a day at work. But just because it’s comfort food doesn’t mean there aren’t techniques. They’re the same ones that go into every restaurant pasta you’ve ever loved: Salt the boiling water cook the pasta al dente create a silky sauce that marries pasta water, Parmesan, olive oil, and butter. Get the recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/pantry-pasta-new

You’re looking at the quintessential June dessert, perfected by the BA Test Kitchen. This is part of BA's Best, a collection of our essential recipes. Get the recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/bas-best-strawberry-shortcake

Eating an ice cream sandwich can make you feel like a kid again. But if you’ve ever tried making one at home, you know it’s not as easy as 1-2-3. The Test Kitchen's Claire Saffitz shows you how to make delicious ice cream sandwiches, using homemade cookies and store-bought ice cream. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/story/how-to-make-chocolate-ice-cream-sandwiches

Fire up the grill and let's make some wings! The Test Kitchen's Carla Music grills up some marinated chicken wings with shishito peppers. Word to the wise: shishito peppers aren't spicy. other than the very occasional one that may melt your tongue, but they're worth it! Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/grilled-chicken-wings-with-shishito-peppers-and-herbs

Everybody has a different opinion on how to make lobster rolls. Whether top split or side split, butter or mayo, there is no single way to make a perfect one. Chris makes lobster rolls from scratch, starting by 'dispatching' the live lobsters (not for the faint of heart) Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/best-of-both-worlds-lobster-roll

When most people think short ribs they think, "low and slow." Andy shows us how to quickly grill short ribs to absolute perfection. Andy also adds pickled daikon slices that pair perfectly with the short ribs.

Want to make brick oven-style pizza but lack the equipment? Well, fire up the grill because it's about as close as you can get at home! The Bon Appétit Test Kitchen's very own Carla Music shows you how to make the only grilled pizzas you'll ever need!

The filling for this blueberry pie with ginger will be loose when it comes out of the oven, but as long as you let it rest for the full 4 hours, it will firm beautifully. Get the recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/blueberry-ginger-double-crust-pie

Springy ramen noodles and a cilantro-miso sauce bring a welcome twist to a classic pesto recipe. And the noodles are just a vessel for the savory, gingery, simple weeknight sauce. Get the recipes! Miso Pesto Ramen: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/miso-pesto-with-ramen-noodles Ginger Scallion Ramen Noodles: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/ginger-scallion-ramen-noodles

Ground chuck is a great all-purpose, buy-it-anywhere choice for burgers. But if you want to get ambitious and blend, say, chuck with ground short rib or brisket, we say go for it. Get the recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/the-ba-smash-burger

Bon Appétit Test Kitchen Manager Brad Leone is back for episode 37 of “It’s Alive” and this time he's making fermented eggs! Sounds a bit scary, but it's actually a delicious twist on pickled eggs. Perfect for a well-seasoned egg salad, deviled eggs, or in Brad's case, the perfect way to top off some tomato toast.

A great Caesar salad recipe gets its swagger from a great Caesar dressing recipe. Squeamish about raw egg yolks and anchovies? Sorry. Yolks are what give richness to the emulsion, while anchovies provide a briny blast (and that whole umami thing). Learn how to make ba's best classic caesar salad with Molly Baz! Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/classic-caesar-salad

Freezing fresh pineapple definitely makes the best impact flavor-wise in this piña colada recipe, but you can use 8 oz. frozen pineapple if you wish. The world-famous Brad Leone makes BA's best piña coladas - just be careful, they may be sweet and delicious but they pack a punch. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/bas-best-pina-colada

Learn how to grill salmon with the Test Kitchen's Andy! For this lemony grilled salmon recipe, you absolutely want to cook fish that still has its skin on. It protects the fish while it grills and, despite what you think or have been told, will help it release from the grill grates more easily. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/grilled-salmon-with-lemon-sesame-sauce

Claire shows you how to make a pasta salad that's perfect to make during peak tomato season! The reason this pasta salad holds up so well at room temperature is because you dress it twice. It absorbs the first round of dressing completely, the second addition keeps it glossy, and a fistful of walnuts and breadcrumbs means there’s always something to bite into. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/romesco-pasta-salad-with-basil-and-parmesan

Shrimp cocktail is one of those when it’s good it’s freaking great, and when it’s not, it’s an abomination, kind of foods. As simple as it seems when you’re housing them from an ice-filled dish at a party, a lot goes into constructing the perfectly poached shrimp cocktail. Well, Molly is here to show you how to make BA's classic shrimp cocktail! Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/story/bas-best-shrimp-cocktail-ready-to-party

Join Andy in the Test Kitchen as he makes Khoresh Gheymeh, a traditional Persian stew topped with strips of fried potato.

Join Molly in the Test Kitchen as she makes Pasta al Limone. This classic lemon sauce recipe has a lot of fat and a lot of acidity, so don’t be shy with adding salt and taste as you go. It will likely require more than you think to strike that perfect balance. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/pasta-al-limone

Carla is joined by the ultimate contessa Ina Garten to make chocolate-pecan scones. Scones can go one of two ways: they can turn out like hockey pucks or like light, flakey disks. Carla and Ina show you how to make the latter. Buy Ina Garten's 'Cook Like a Pro: Recipes and Tips for Home Cooks:' https://amzn.to/2A7hiEH Check out the full recipe here: https://bonappetit.com/recipe/ina-garten-chocolate-pecan-scones

Treat scallops to the flavorful oil left behind when you cook chorizo—it’s basically liquid gold. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/pan-seared-scallops-with-chorizo-and-corn

Learn how to make this spicy, funky shrimp dish with the Test Kitchen's Andy Baraghani! This recipe is full of fish sauce, so don't be scared of the funk! Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/shrimp-and-basil-stir-fry

Join Carla in the Test Kitchen as she makes Instant Pot ribs. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/instant-pot-glazed-and-grilled-ribs

Cooking a perfect, crowd-pleasing turkey on Thanksgiving can be a daunting task, but it doesn't have to be. The Test Kitchen's Andy Baraghani is here to how you how to make a simple and traditional Thanksgiving turkey. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/dry-rubbed-roast-turkey Captured on Google Pixel 3

Join Molly in the Test Kitchen as she makes arancini (deep fried stuffed rice balls)! To make these Sicilian cheese-filled snacks, you first have to make risotto, then use the risotto to make cheese-stuffed balls, then coat them with breadcrumbs and deep-fry them. It’s a labor of love that will make other people love you, which is reason enough to give this recipe a try. Check out the recipe here: https://bonappetit.com/recipe/mozzarella-arancini-stuffed-rice-balls

Rick Martinez is back in the Test Kitchen to make double-pork carnitas with corn tortillas and green pico de gallo. That's right, these carnitas use two kinds of pork (shoulder and belly) because one is definitely not enough. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/entertaining-style/parties/article/carnitas-party

Join Carla in the Test Kitchen as she makes an apple tart! This unadorned tart bakes at a fairly high temperature and boasts a deeply browned crisp crust. The apples at the bottom of the tart are insulated from direct heat, so they steam and soften into a very tender layer. The ones up top hold their shape, which means you’ll get a mix of textures in each bite. Check out the recipe here: https://bonappetit.com/recipe/naked-apple-tart

Join Rick in the Test Kitchen as he makes toffee cookies! Using chocolate wafers instead of chips is a cookie game-changer. They spread as they melt, creating thin pockets of chocolate in each layer, and stay much softer at room temperature. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/brown-butter-and-toffee-chocolate-chip-cookies Recipe by Kate Davis

Join Molly in the Test Kitchen as she makes pumpkin bread with maple butter! Pumpkin Spice Bread gets all grown up thanks to the addition of fresh ginger in this super-moist no-fuss bread with a crunchy pumpkin seed topping. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/pumpkin-bread-with-salted-maple-butter

Drag Queen Miz Cracker reunites with Carla in the Test Kitchen to make latkes for Chanukah! Check out the latkes recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/adam-maxines-famous-latkes

Join Andy in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes pomegranate-glazed chicken. The yogurt in the marinade, along with the honey and pomegranate molasses in the glaze, will give the chicken lots of color. Go with it. The very dark charred parts are extra tasty. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/pomegranate-glazed-chicken-with-buttery-pine-nuts

Join Priya in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes shahi toast! The name may be a bit confusing as it's not toast in the traditional sense, but a no-bake bread pudding with cardamon, sugar and lots of heavy cream. Check out Priya's book here: https://httpslink.com/2flo

Join Rick Martinez in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen to get tipsy as he makes a hibiscus pineapple cocktail with tequila. You'll love the citrusy sour flavor of hibiscus, not to mention its amazing color. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/pineapple-hibiscus-cocktail

Priya is back in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen to make pav bhaji, a popular Indian street food. The recipe is made of two parts: the 'pav' (a dinner roll) and the 'bhaji' (vegetable gravy). These two parts come together to make something like a vegetarian sloppy joe! Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/story/pav-bhaji Check out Priya's book here: https://httpslink.com/2flo

Join Carla in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes a salted caramel-chocolate tart! Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/salted-caramel-chocolate-tart

Join Andy Baraghani in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes chicken soup with sweet potatoes! If you want this take on classic chicken soup to have a similar consistency to congee, add 10–15 minutes to the cooking time so that it can become nice and thick. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/chicken-rice-soup Take part in the 2019 Healthyish Feel Good Food Plan: https://www.bonappetit.com/collection/feel-good-food-plan-2019

Join Priya Krishna in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes shrimp pulao with quinoa. Pulao is an Indian staple and this quinoa variation is the perfect one-pot dish to make when you're feeling lazy after work. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/story/indian-ish-shrimp-quinoa-pulao

Join Chris Morocco in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes grilled brisket with peanut salsa. Normally, you associate brisket with long, slow cooking—maybe on a winter afternoon—but we’re making a case for throwing it on the grill. Freezing the brisket makes it easier to slice it against the grain, which nullifies its naturally ropy texture and exposes more surface area to the flavorful marinade.

Join Andy Baraghani in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes this variation on a classic Thai recipe: mushroom larb with peanuts! Don’t even think about tossing, stirring, or shaking that pan until the mushrooms are golden brown and crisp. You want to achieve that flavorful texture before incorporating the additional aromatics. Follow the Healthyish Feel Good Plan: https://www.bonappetit.com/collection/feel-good-food-plan-2019

Join Priya in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes roti pizza with cilantro chutney. Roti makes for the perfect, charred, crispy pizza crust and cheddar cheese and cilantro chutney take it to the next level.

Join Claire Saffitz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she bakes swirled sesame cake. This savory dessert, which is an amazing combination of cardamom, sesame and tahini, gives you a perfect "swirl" of flavor.

Join Molly Baz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes adult macaroni & cheese! It's just about as easy as opening one of those little boxes of shells and powdered sauce—and a whole lot more delicious. Our super-quick stovetop mac and cheese borrows from the method for a classic cacio e pepe pasta, but with a bit of milk to make it extra creamy. No béchamel, no baking, just pure dairy-on-carbs joy. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/adult-mac-and-cheese

It doesn't have to be your birthday eat this birthday cake. Join Claire Saffitz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she bakes a birthday sheet cake with a chocolate cream cheese frosting! Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/easy-sheet-cake-with-chocolate-cream-cheese-frosting

Join Claire Saffitz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes cast-iron skillet pizza with fennel and sausage. Pizza dough is usually sold as a 1-lb. ball. You only need 12 oz. for this cast-iron pizza recipe. We used a 10" pan, so if yours is bigger, use a bit more dough. Cooking sausage in the pan before adding the dough infuses the crust with porky flavor. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/cast-iron-pizza-with-fennel-and-sausage

Join Chris Morocco in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes gluten-free carrot cake. This recipe uses almond flour, a wonderfully sweet, nutty complement for fresh carrots, walnuts, and raisins. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/gluten-free-carrot-cake

Join Chris Morocco in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes molten caramel cake. Everybody has heard of molten chocolate cake, so we thought we’d try to create a caramel version, with a toffee-ish tender cake encasing a runny dulce de leche center. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/molten-caramel-cakes

Join Carla Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes butter-basted steaks with fennel salad. There are just a few steps to make perfect steak: Step 1: Buy a great steak from a great butcher. Step 2: Salt it liberally. Step 3: Gradually build up a crusty sear. Step 4: Butter. Butter?! Yep—butter. Browned, nutty butter will deliver toasty flavor to every bite. It’s the secret to pretty much all the great steakhouse dinners you’ve ever had.

Few legal substances can compete with a crispy chicken sandwich (no deep fryer necessary!) that’s been topped with a cool slaw. Get the recipe: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/chicken-cutlet-sandwiches-with-savoy-cabbage-slaw

This grilled chicken sandwich recipe (thighs only!) gets the BA treatment from senior associate food editor Molly Baz. The goal was to dispel any associations you might have with the sandwich: the sort of floppy, slightly rubbery fast food versions with a single, soggy leaf of lettuce. It's inspired by Caesar salad, inspired by mayonnaise, inspired by the idea of special sauce, inspired by grill marks, and the words “charred buns.”

Contributing writer Priya Krishna makes her From the Test Kitchen debut with Dahi Toast, "a more interesting, Indian-ish grilled cheese sandwich," made with Greek yogurt and sourdough bread. Just one thing: don't skip the Chhonk. Check out Priya's book here: https://httpslink.com/2flo

Drag Queen and pickle expert Miz Cracker is back in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen AGAIN. This time Carla teaches her how to make pickles and what her family calls 'friendly sandwiches,' a pickle-heavy grilled cheese with ham.

Join Chris Morocco in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen to meal prep a week of lunches as part of the 2019 Heathyish Feel Good Food Plan! Using our recipe for what might be the best chickpeas ever, Chris makes chickpea salad with bitter greens and tahini-ranch dressing and a smashed chickpea sandwich. Follow the Healthyish Feel Good Plan: https://www.bonappetit.com/collection/feel-good-food-plan-2019

Join Brad Leone in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes fried bologna sandwiches. For this bologna sandwich recipe, cutting slits into the bologna before cooking helps it brown evenly across the surface and prevents it from curling and warping as they fry. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/fried-bologna-sandwich

Join Carla in the Test Kitchen as she make pasta e fagioli! The key to a soup with fully developed savory flavor starts with the soffritto—a mix of aromatic vegetables that are slowly cooked in the first stage of cooking. Take your time sweating down the vegetables until they are completely softened before letting them take on any color. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/pasta-e-fagioli

These extra corny cornbread muffins are corny not because they tell dad jokes, but because there are actual kernels of fresh corn in there, plus sour cream for moistness, and cornmeal so you can actually taste corn.

Join Chris Morocco as he teaches you how to make these pretty healthy gluten-free buckwheat chocolate waffles. Pro tip: don't skip out on the ricotta cream topping! Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/gluten-free-chocolate-and-buckwheat-waffles

We tackled every element of the classic eggs Benedict recipe to optimize it for a crowd. Poaching eggs in advance. A hollandaise that will stay luscious for hours. A tray of perfectly toasted, buttery muffins. Yep—it’s all here. This recipe comes together in under an hour and much of it can be prepped in advance, leaving you free to entertain.

Senior Food Editor Claire Saffitz developed these morning buns with some inspiration from Tartine, a little extra cardamom, and whole wheat flour to add a nutty and nearly-heathy flavor. Too many morning buns for your crowd? This recipe halves easily. This is part of BA's Best, a collection of our essential recipes.

The dough will seem fairly wet when shaping into rounds, but the high hydration is key to forming those trademark nooks and crannies. This is part of BA's Best, a collection of our essential recipes.

Molly Baz makes our ultimate two-egg breakfast sandwich. Warning: A fork and knife (or a bib, at the very least) may be required to tackle this sandwich.

Join Rick Martinez in the Test Kitchen as he makes classic chilaquiles, the ultimate use-all-your-leftovers breakfast meal. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/chilaquiles-with-fried-eggs

Join Molly Baz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes dark chocolate chia parfait! This chia pudding is delicious on its own—and even better when layered with maple yogurt as a parfait. Leftover maple yogurt can be repurposed for breakfast and topped with fruit and granola. It’s a choose-your-own-adventure kind of dessert.

Join Carla Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes baked eggs in tomato. The trick is getting the eggs cooked so that the whites are set and the yolks are still jammy—starting with room temperature eggs is key, so soak them in hot water for a few minutes if they're cold from the fridge. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/30-minute-shakshuka-with-yogurt

Join Molly Baz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes a burnished basque cheesecake. This cheesecake is the alter ego to the classic New York–style cheesecake with a press-in cookie crust. Inspired by a Basque version, this is the cheesecake that wants to get burnt, cracked, and cooked at high heat. Which also means this is the cheesecake that’s impossible to mess up. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/basque-burnt-cheesecake

Join Carla Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes a soufflé-style omelet. Your arm may get tired during all of the whisking, but make sure the egg white peaks are firm enough to stand up on their own while still having a nice shine to them!

Join Chris Morocco in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes spicy-sweet sambal pork noodles. These weeknight noodles are inspired by the silky richness of meaty tomato sauce and the fiery, tangy-sweet flavors of pad kee mao (a.k.a. drunken noodles). It's full-on explosive flavor in under an hour. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/spicy-sweet-sambal-pork-noodles

Join Andy Baraghani in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes salted chocolate halva. Salt and bittersweet chocolate lend a savory, sophisticated edge to this typically saccharine-sweet dessert. Halva can be a little tricky to make at first, and a candy thermometer is key to nailing the right temperature, which creates the desired flaky, crystallized texture. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/salted-chocolate-halva

Join Chris Morocco in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes spicy chicken katsu sandwiches. These sandwiches combine the shattering panko crispiness of katsu-style cutlets and the fiery heat found in Nashville-style hot chicken with some cooling shredded lettuce to put out the fire. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/spicy-chicken-katsu-sandwiches

Join Andy Baraghani in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes chicken and tomato stew with caramelized onions. Cooking lemon slices to almost-burnt adds a layer of complex flavor to this comforting dish. Cinnamon's sweet, earthy flavor tames tomatoes' juicy acidity. Apply this same thinking to other baking spices like nutmeg and cloves. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/chicken-and-tomato-stew-with-caramelized-lemon

Join Priya Krishna in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes feta cooked like saag paneer. Saag paneer is great, but you haven’t lived until you have made saag feta: Priya's take on a classic Indian dish of of firm, curdled, and unmeltable cheese simmered in a gravy made of greens (often spinach)

Join Andy Baraghani in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as he makes herb rice with scallions and saffron. This recipe is a labor of love. This rice dish is based on one of the most famous Persian polos (pilaf), known as sabzi polo. And while the fried shallots are not traditional (you can take them out if you’d like), they add a crunchy layer to the dish. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/herb-rice-with-green-garlic-saffron-and-crispy-shallots

Join Carla Music in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes meatball subs! We like the combo of spicy and sweet Italian sausage, but use any uncooked sausage you like—merguez or chorizo would work. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/sausage-meatball-sandwiches

Join Molly Baz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes mushroom carbonara. Mushrooms aren't exactly a substitute for the guanciale or pancetta that you would normally have in carbonara, but they bring their own deep flavor to the dish. Check out the recipe here: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/mushroom-carbonara

Join Molly Baz in the Bon Appétit Test Kitchen as she makes one skillet rotisserie chicken pot pie. Who doesn't like chicken pot pie? Rotisserie chicken, store-bought puff pastry, and just one skillet keep this hearty dinner recipe from feeling too fussy—or taking all day to make.

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Who is Mike G?

Over the past seven years, Mike G has been on a mission to spread his passion of home cooking through educational and entertaining digital food content. Through his youtube channel with 2.2 millions subscribers and his online course, he has inspired thousands of people to overcome their fears of the kitchen and take back the art of cooking. ​

Mike believes that cooking is an intrinsic part of life, but unfortunately, it has lost a lot of its value in our current culture. By creating a stronger cooking foundation in your life, you will be able to provide for the people you love, live a healthier lifestyle and connect more deeply to yourself.

​With engaging video content and an educational platform, Mike spreads his message of empowerment in the kitchen and is growing a global movement of pro-home cooks.

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Steak Tips from the Pros

When it comes to cooking meat, give me a pot roast or pork shoulder and I&rsquom golden: I&rsquom plenty comfortable with a lovely long, slow braise. But when it comes cooking a steak, I&rsquove always been a little timid. No longer!

When it comes to cooking meat, give me a pot roast or pork shoulder and I’m golden: I’m plenty comfortable with a lovely long, slow braise. But when it comes cooking a steak, I’ve always been a little timid. No longer! Researching our America’s Best New Steakhouse Recipes story for our February issue was the ultimate crash course in how𠅊nd how not—to cook steak, and chatting with some of America’s best meat cooks banished my fears. We could have dedicated a whole issue to the art of steak cookery. Instead, here, a few of my favorite tips shared by some of the extraordinary chefs from the story:

ON SEASONING

Grant Achatz, Alinea and Next Chicago: “Use a lot of salt. Everybody underseasons meat. Meat is like an avocado if you’re making guacamole, or mashed potatoes. They take a tremendous amount of salt before they actually become well seasoned.”

ON CHOOSING YOUR WEAPON: GRILL OR PAN

Michael White, Costata New York City: 𠇊 cast-iron pan is your best friend when you cook steak at home because it retains heat well. When you initially put the meat into a hot cast-iron skillet, you’ll get really nice caramelization.”

Achatz: “How I cook steak at home depends on the season. During the warm months, I use my half-melted Weber grill outside, which burns real hardwood, not charcoal. And when I say melted, I mean the heat gets so hot the plastic handles have succumbed to the state of melted candles and the belly of the grill is warped. During the winter, when it is unbearable to be outside in Chicago, I sear the meat in a cast-iron pan. I leave the pan on the burner full blast for an hour, as hot as I can get it. Even with the front door open and the hood fan on, when the steak hits the pan it’s only a matter of time before the smoke detector goes off: That is a sign the pan is almost hot enough.”

ON BEING TOO TOUCHY-FEELY

Marc Forgione, American Cut New York City: “I try not to be the chef when I go to a friend’s house for a barbecue, but I can’t stand it when guys flip the steak a hundred times to get the flames to come up. You should only touch the steak three or four times the whole time you’re cooking it, whether it’s on the grill or in a pan. There’s a lot of juice in there that you don’t want to mess with.”

Tim Love, Queenie’s Denton, Texas: 𠇌ooking steaks is really easy, and that’s what makes it so hard. It’s three movements: You put it on the grill, you flip it and you take it off the grill. That’s it.”

ON KNOWING WHEN IT’S DONE

John Gorham, Tasty n Alder Portland, Oregon: “Use your thermometer, and know how to calibrate it. There’s no shame in a thermometer at all. People will tell you about the trick of testing a steak’s doneness by pressing on it and comparing it to the firmness of the flesh of your hand, but all steaks have different muscle fibers, so it doesn’t always work.”

ON SERVING STEAK AT A PARTY

Love: “Sear the steaks on the grill or in your cast-iron pan until they’re slightly more rare than you want them, and then let them rest at room temperature for up to three or four hours. When you’re ready to eat, put them on the top rack in your grill and shut the lid, or pop them in the oven at 450 degrees for just a minute or two, and they’ll be ready to serve, right at the temperature where you want them.”


Recipes: How to make ‘Spaghetti al Van Nuys’ and other Italian-American dishes

It’s hard to imagine American cuisine without Italian influence. Without pasta. Without spaghetti and meatballs. Without pizza.

More than five million Italians immigrated to the United States between 1876 and 1910. At first their regional dishes were looked down on, but in the 1940s their popularity grew, especially in New York where the cuisine eventually entered the realm of fine dining.

There’s something about Italian food that’s completely irresistible, whether it’s authentic or an American adaptation. Growing up in the ’50s in the San Fernando Valley, one of my favorite dishes was my mother’s Americanized version of Spaghetti Bolognese. Her sauce teemed with loads of chopped celery and fresh mushrooms, weighted down with more than a pound of ground meat. (Mom used ground beef, I use a combination of ground turkey and sweet Italian sausage.) Mom’s theory was that the dish should have more meat than pasta, more protein than starch. More Americano than Italiano.

“Big Flavors from Italian America” from the writers at America’s Test Kitchen ($29.95) focuses on Italian American cooking, having sourced many of the recipes from humble delis and hole-in-the-wall restaurants across America, as well as unassuming pizza parlors.

“Some dishes never diverged from their roots, but many more adapted to American ingredients and influences,” writes Tucker Shaw, the book’s editor-in-chief. “Tastes evolved and inventive cooks devised new ways to serve them.”

Here’s my adaptation of my mother’s Spaghetti al Van Nuys, as well as two recipes from the book, noodles tossed with a rich sausage ragu and a piccata dish that showcases shrimp.

Bring on the bibs. Lock up the dog. Mangia bene.

Spaghetti Al Van Nuys

Yield: 5 servings

INGREDIENTS

1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil

8 ounces sliced fresh mushrooms

2 medium carrot, peeled, minced

1 pound ground beef or ground turkey

6 ounces sweet Italian sausage, casing removed

1 (25- to 28-ounce) jar prepared Marinara pasta sauce

2 tablespoons minced fresh thyme OR 2 teaspoons dried “Italian blend” herbs

1/4 cup chopped Italian parsley

Optional: Pinch dried red pepper flakes

12 ounces dried spaghetti, cooked al dente according to package directions, drained see cook’s notes

For passing: Freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Cook’s notes: If desired, increase amount of pasta to 16 ounces. It will increase serving size and folks who like lots of pasta will approve.

PROCEDURE

1. In large pot or Dutch oven, heat oil on medium-high heat. (I like to use a deep 8-quart pot because it’s deep enough to prevent tomato sauce from splattering on stove top.) Add celery and onion cook until softened, about 4-5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add mushrooms, carrots and garlic cook 3-4 minutes or until any liquid released from vegetables has evaporated, stirring occasionally. Add beef or turkey and sausage. Cook, breaking up meat with spatula, until meat is cooked through, about 5-7 minutes.

2. Add sauce and stir to combine. Fill empty sauce jar 1/3 full with water screw on lid and shake to incorporate any remaining sauce into water. Stir now-red water mixture into sauce. Add herbs. Taste and add salt and pepper as needed. Reduce heat to medium-low. Gently simmer 20 minutes.

3. Add parsley to sauce. Stir and taste again. If it tastes bland, add a small pinch of dried red pepper flakes and adjust salt and/or pepper. Toss in drained, cooked spaghetti. Serve with Parmesan cheese.

Source: Harriett Young’s 1950s kitchen, in the then-“country-in-the-suburbs” of Van Nuys, Calif.

Shrimp Piccata Pasta

Shrimp Piccata Pasta is made with a pound each of shrimp and linguine. (Photo by Daniel J. van Ackere, America’s Test Kitchen)

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided use

1 pound large shrimp (26 to 30 per pound), peeled, deveined, halved lengthwise

1/8 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes

1 8-ounce bottle clam juice

3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

3 tablespoons capers, drained

1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley

4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened

Cook’s notes: Be sure to toss the shrimp and sauce with the pasta immediately after draining. The hot pasta will heat the shrimp and melt the butter.

PROCEDURE

1. Brings about 4 quarts of water to boil in large pot for pasta. Add pasta and 1 tablespoon salt and cook, stirring often, until al dente. Reserve 1/2 cup cooking water, then drain pasta and return it to the pot (see cook’s notes).

2. Meanwhile, while waiting for water to come to a boil, heat 1 tablespoon oil in large deep skillet over high heat. Add shrimp and cook, stirring, until just opaque, about 1 minute. Transfer to large plate. Heat remaining 1 tablespoon oil in now-empty skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and pepper flakes and cook until fragrant but not browned, about 30 seconds. Add wine, increase heat to high and simmer until liquid is reduced and syrupy, about 2 minutes. Add clam juice and lemon juice, bring to boil and cook until mixture is reduced to 1/3 cup, about 8 minutes.

3. Add capers, parsley, butter and shrimp and its sauce to pasta and toss to combine until butter melts and shrimp are warmed through. Season with salt and pepper to taste, adding reserved cooking water as needed to adjust consistency. Serve.

Source: “Big Flavors from Italian America” by America’s Test Kitchen

Noodles with Sausage Ragu

Noodles with Sausage Ragu can be made with pappardelle or tagliatelle varieties of wide noodles or fettucine. (Photo by Joe Keller, America’s Test Kitchen)

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

INGREDIENTS

1/2 fennel bulb, stalks discarded, bulb cored and coarsely chopped

1/2 yellow onion, coarsely chopped

1 tablespoon fennel seeds

1 (28-ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes

2 pounds sweet Italian sausage, casings removed

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra for drizzling

1/2 teaspoon salt, plus salt for cooking pasta

2 tablespoons tomato paste

1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano

1 pound pappardelle or tagliatelle (wide noodles or fettucine)

Cook’s notes: You will have 3 cups of extra sauce, which can be refrigerated (for 3 days) or frozen (for 1 month) and used to sauce another pound of pasta — now that’s convenient.

PROCEDURE

1. Pulse fennel, onion, and fennel seeds in food processor until finely chopped, about 10 pulses, scraping down sides of bowl as needed transfer to separate bowl. Process tomatoes in now empty processor until smooth, about 10 seconds transfer to second bowl. Pulse sausage in now empty processor until finely chopped, about 10 pulses, scraping down sides of bowl as needed.

2. Heat oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add sausage and cook, breaking up meat with spoon, until all liquid has evaporated, and meat begins to sizzle, 10 to 15 minutes.

3. Add fennel mixture and 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook stirring occasionally, until softened, about 5 minutes. (Fond — the browned bits — on bottom of pot will be deeply browned.) Add tomato paste, garlic and oregano and cook, stirring constantly until fragrant, about 30 seconds.

4. Stir in wine, scraping up any browned bits and cook until nearly evaporated about 1 minute. Add water and pureed tomatoes and bring to simmer. Reduce heat on low and simmer gently, uncovered, until thickened, about 45 minutes. (Wooden spoon should leave trail when dragged through sauce.) Season with salt and pepper to taste cover and keep warm.

5. Bring about 4 quarts of water to a boil in large pot. Add pasta and 1 tablespoon salt and cook, stirring often, until al dente. Reserve 1 cup cooking water, then drain pasta and return it to pot. Add 3 cups sauce and 1/2 cup reserved cooking water as needed (see cook’s notes). Transfer to serving dish. Drizzle with extra oil, sprinkle with Parmesan and serve.

Source: “Big Flavors from Italian America” by America’s Test Kitchen


15 Cooking Tips That'll Change Every Home Cook's Life

Whether you're a hesitant beginner or a consummate professional, everyone who sets foot in a kitchen needs a refresher on the basics sometimes. Here, in no particular order, Delish editors walk you through the cooking tips that changed their lives&mdashand the ones they know will change yours, too.

Did you love Ina's perfect roast chicken recipe but hate the onion-to-garlic ratio? You won't remember that when you pull the recipe back out a year from now&mdashbut the Post-It you left on the page reminding you so will help.

If nothing else, it'll prevent you from keeping a very hot oven on for too long.

There is no limit to how many things you can do with your leftover bacon grease. Fry your eggs in it. Fry your potatoes in it. Make a damn bacon candle! The possibilities are endless.

This prevents it from swiveling around while you're trying to do something with a very sharp knife.

Not only do all ovens heat differently, but you'll also never really know how yours handles a new protein or veggie at first. That's all to say you can always fix an undercooked situation&mdashthere's nothing to be done once you go over.

Never just season at the end. It'll be too far gone.

If something doesn&rsquot look quite right, it probably isn&rsquot. You know more about the food you're cooking than you think.

One editor explains you should even salt dessert: "It helps to bring out, accentuate, and deepen all sorts of flavors and will help your sweet treats taste more complex."

Baking is a science, after all. Would you mess with what's called for in a science experiment?

Rather than allowing a mess to pile up as you go, take little breaks to clean the surfaces and tools you've already used. Even though it might not feel like it in the moment, it'll save you time and stress later.

Unless you'd like a fresh layer of skin, that is.

Garlic presses are a waste of money&mdashthey compromise the texture of your beloved allium, take time to clean, and actually slow things down.

Again&mdashit's always better to undercook than overcook. And cookies will continue to cook on the tray after you take them out of the oven.

If you have more than one thing you need to chop, this saves you an immense amount of time cleaning.


Watch the video: How to Eat A Lobster (January 2022).