Traditional recipes

Celebrity Chef Brian Malarkey’s Guide to a Perfect Picnic

Celebrity Chef Brian Malarkey’s Guide to a Perfect Picnic

The chef gives his best tips for the best picnic

Celebrity chef Brian Malarkey shares his ideas for putting together a nice picnic lunch at his Herb and Eatery in Little Italy.

In the heat of the summer when I was a kid growing up in L.A.’s San Fernando Valley, my mom would often make a collection of sandwiches — peanut butter and jelly, bologna or tuna fish —that she would wrap up and package with carrot and celery sticks, whole peaches or plums and cookies. Strawberry Kool-Aid may have been involved back then, too. Then she would send my brother and sister and me out to the backyard with a blanket or towel so we could have a “picnic.”

There were many other picnics in our life as a young family, including the big gatherings at L.A.’s Griffith Park with extended family. And as I got older, still more. As a young adult, I enjoyed the competitive preconcert picnics first on the Great Lawn in New York City’s Central Park and when I returned to L.A., at the Hollywood Bowl, at which attendees would vie for the most decadent or elaborate collections of food and picnic décor. Back then, my friends and I would make or bring pasta salads, lobster and cheesecake — and be the envy of surrounding concertgoers.

Now, as a San Diego resident, my picnic experiences have been far more laid back — going to the beach and grilling burgers or chicken or sausages, accompanied by a spicy coleslaw, bread and butter pickles, olives and watermelon and/or lemon bars for dessert.


Travel Show: Cooking with chefs Amy Finley and Brian Malarkey

High-energy Amy Finley gave a fast-paced cooking demonstration Saturday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. (She returns at 11 a.m. Sunday (today) for a second demo.) Finley, a classically trained cook and the author of “How to Eat a Small Country,” prepared lapin a la moutarde, or rabbit with mustard, a traditional Burgundian dish.

She’s an advocate for getting people to eat more rabbit but admitted that it’s tricky thinking of a “fluffy bunny and what you’re having for dinner.”

Despite a badly sliced thumb (a hazard of working with sharp objects), Finley proceeded with a how-to session in cutting up rabbit, then prepared the lapin, followed by a session with what she called the “food guillotine,” or the mandoline, which she fearlessly used to slice potatoes.

From May 15-24, Finley will lead a 10-day Springtime in Paris/Adventure by the Book tour around Paris and the French countryside. Highlights of the tour include nine days deluxe lodging in Paris and Burgundy, a cooking class and dinner with former European editor of Gourmet magazine, Alec Lobrano, author of “Hungry for Paris.” Cost for the tour is $3,995 per person, double occupancy. Airfare is not included.

Finley, the Season 3 winner of the “Next Food Network Star,” will be back Sunday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. Her demonstration takes place at 11 a.m. on the Culinary Stage.

Finley was followed by chef Brian Malarkey, creator and owner of five San Diego restaurants and a judge-mentor on ABC’s “The Taste.” In between preparing shrimp and grits, he tossed out a number of useful tips: “There are no rules in cooking” and “If you’re trying to sell a house, bake some bread.”


Travel Show: Cooking with chefs Amy Finley and Brian Malarkey

High-energy Amy Finley gave a fast-paced cooking demonstration Saturday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. (She returns at 11 a.m. Sunday (today) for a second demo.) Finley, a classically trained cook and the author of “How to Eat a Small Country,” prepared lapin a la moutarde, or rabbit with mustard, a traditional Burgundian dish.

She’s an advocate for getting people to eat more rabbit but admitted that it’s tricky thinking of a “fluffy bunny and what you’re having for dinner.”

Despite a badly sliced thumb (a hazard of working with sharp objects), Finley proceeded with a how-to session in cutting up rabbit, then prepared the lapin, followed by a session with what she called the “food guillotine,” or the mandoline, which she fearlessly used to slice potatoes.

From May 15-24, Finley will lead a 10-day Springtime in Paris/Adventure by the Book tour around Paris and the French countryside. Highlights of the tour include nine days deluxe lodging in Paris and Burgundy, a cooking class and dinner with former European editor of Gourmet magazine, Alec Lobrano, author of “Hungry for Paris.” Cost for the tour is $3,995 per person, double occupancy. Airfare is not included.

Finley, the Season 3 winner of the “Next Food Network Star,” will be back Sunday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. Her demonstration takes place at 11 a.m. on the Culinary Stage.

Finley was followed by chef Brian Malarkey, creator and owner of five San Diego restaurants and a judge-mentor on ABC’s “The Taste.” In between preparing shrimp and grits, he tossed out a number of useful tips: “There are no rules in cooking” and “If you’re trying to sell a house, bake some bread.”


Travel Show: Cooking with chefs Amy Finley and Brian Malarkey

High-energy Amy Finley gave a fast-paced cooking demonstration Saturday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. (She returns at 11 a.m. Sunday (today) for a second demo.) Finley, a classically trained cook and the author of “How to Eat a Small Country,” prepared lapin a la moutarde, or rabbit with mustard, a traditional Burgundian dish.

She’s an advocate for getting people to eat more rabbit but admitted that it’s tricky thinking of a “fluffy bunny and what you’re having for dinner.”

Despite a badly sliced thumb (a hazard of working with sharp objects), Finley proceeded with a how-to session in cutting up rabbit, then prepared the lapin, followed by a session with what she called the “food guillotine,” or the mandoline, which she fearlessly used to slice potatoes.

From May 15-24, Finley will lead a 10-day Springtime in Paris/Adventure by the Book tour around Paris and the French countryside. Highlights of the tour include nine days deluxe lodging in Paris and Burgundy, a cooking class and dinner with former European editor of Gourmet magazine, Alec Lobrano, author of “Hungry for Paris.” Cost for the tour is $3,995 per person, double occupancy. Airfare is not included.

Finley, the Season 3 winner of the “Next Food Network Star,” will be back Sunday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. Her demonstration takes place at 11 a.m. on the Culinary Stage.

Finley was followed by chef Brian Malarkey, creator and owner of five San Diego restaurants and a judge-mentor on ABC’s “The Taste.” In between preparing shrimp and grits, he tossed out a number of useful tips: “There are no rules in cooking” and “If you’re trying to sell a house, bake some bread.”


Travel Show: Cooking with chefs Amy Finley and Brian Malarkey

High-energy Amy Finley gave a fast-paced cooking demonstration Saturday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. (She returns at 11 a.m. Sunday (today) for a second demo.) Finley, a classically trained cook and the author of “How to Eat a Small Country,” prepared lapin a la moutarde, or rabbit with mustard, a traditional Burgundian dish.

She’s an advocate for getting people to eat more rabbit but admitted that it’s tricky thinking of a “fluffy bunny and what you’re having for dinner.”

Despite a badly sliced thumb (a hazard of working with sharp objects), Finley proceeded with a how-to session in cutting up rabbit, then prepared the lapin, followed by a session with what she called the “food guillotine,” or the mandoline, which she fearlessly used to slice potatoes.

From May 15-24, Finley will lead a 10-day Springtime in Paris/Adventure by the Book tour around Paris and the French countryside. Highlights of the tour include nine days deluxe lodging in Paris and Burgundy, a cooking class and dinner with former European editor of Gourmet magazine, Alec Lobrano, author of “Hungry for Paris.” Cost for the tour is $3,995 per person, double occupancy. Airfare is not included.

Finley, the Season 3 winner of the “Next Food Network Star,” will be back Sunday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. Her demonstration takes place at 11 a.m. on the Culinary Stage.

Finley was followed by chef Brian Malarkey, creator and owner of five San Diego restaurants and a judge-mentor on ABC’s “The Taste.” In between preparing shrimp and grits, he tossed out a number of useful tips: “There are no rules in cooking” and “If you’re trying to sell a house, bake some bread.”


Travel Show: Cooking with chefs Amy Finley and Brian Malarkey

High-energy Amy Finley gave a fast-paced cooking demonstration Saturday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. (She returns at 11 a.m. Sunday (today) for a second demo.) Finley, a classically trained cook and the author of “How to Eat a Small Country,” prepared lapin a la moutarde, or rabbit with mustard, a traditional Burgundian dish.

She’s an advocate for getting people to eat more rabbit but admitted that it’s tricky thinking of a “fluffy bunny and what you’re having for dinner.”

Despite a badly sliced thumb (a hazard of working with sharp objects), Finley proceeded with a how-to session in cutting up rabbit, then prepared the lapin, followed by a session with what she called the “food guillotine,” or the mandoline, which she fearlessly used to slice potatoes.

From May 15-24, Finley will lead a 10-day Springtime in Paris/Adventure by the Book tour around Paris and the French countryside. Highlights of the tour include nine days deluxe lodging in Paris and Burgundy, a cooking class and dinner with former European editor of Gourmet magazine, Alec Lobrano, author of “Hungry for Paris.” Cost for the tour is $3,995 per person, double occupancy. Airfare is not included.

Finley, the Season 3 winner of the “Next Food Network Star,” will be back Sunday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. Her demonstration takes place at 11 a.m. on the Culinary Stage.

Finley was followed by chef Brian Malarkey, creator and owner of five San Diego restaurants and a judge-mentor on ABC’s “The Taste.” In between preparing shrimp and grits, he tossed out a number of useful tips: “There are no rules in cooking” and “If you’re trying to sell a house, bake some bread.”


Travel Show: Cooking with chefs Amy Finley and Brian Malarkey

High-energy Amy Finley gave a fast-paced cooking demonstration Saturday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. (She returns at 11 a.m. Sunday (today) for a second demo.) Finley, a classically trained cook and the author of “How to Eat a Small Country,” prepared lapin a la moutarde, or rabbit with mustard, a traditional Burgundian dish.

She’s an advocate for getting people to eat more rabbit but admitted that it’s tricky thinking of a “fluffy bunny and what you’re having for dinner.”

Despite a badly sliced thumb (a hazard of working with sharp objects), Finley proceeded with a how-to session in cutting up rabbit, then prepared the lapin, followed by a session with what she called the “food guillotine,” or the mandoline, which she fearlessly used to slice potatoes.

From May 15-24, Finley will lead a 10-day Springtime in Paris/Adventure by the Book tour around Paris and the French countryside. Highlights of the tour include nine days deluxe lodging in Paris and Burgundy, a cooking class and dinner with former European editor of Gourmet magazine, Alec Lobrano, author of “Hungry for Paris.” Cost for the tour is $3,995 per person, double occupancy. Airfare is not included.

Finley, the Season 3 winner of the “Next Food Network Star,” will be back Sunday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. Her demonstration takes place at 11 a.m. on the Culinary Stage.

Finley was followed by chef Brian Malarkey, creator and owner of five San Diego restaurants and a judge-mentor on ABC’s “The Taste.” In between preparing shrimp and grits, he tossed out a number of useful tips: “There are no rules in cooking” and “If you’re trying to sell a house, bake some bread.”


Travel Show: Cooking with chefs Amy Finley and Brian Malarkey

High-energy Amy Finley gave a fast-paced cooking demonstration Saturday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. (She returns at 11 a.m. Sunday (today) for a second demo.) Finley, a classically trained cook and the author of “How to Eat a Small Country,” prepared lapin a la moutarde, or rabbit with mustard, a traditional Burgundian dish.

She’s an advocate for getting people to eat more rabbit but admitted that it’s tricky thinking of a “fluffy bunny and what you’re having for dinner.”

Despite a badly sliced thumb (a hazard of working with sharp objects), Finley proceeded with a how-to session in cutting up rabbit, then prepared the lapin, followed by a session with what she called the “food guillotine,” or the mandoline, which she fearlessly used to slice potatoes.

From May 15-24, Finley will lead a 10-day Springtime in Paris/Adventure by the Book tour around Paris and the French countryside. Highlights of the tour include nine days deluxe lodging in Paris and Burgundy, a cooking class and dinner with former European editor of Gourmet magazine, Alec Lobrano, author of “Hungry for Paris.” Cost for the tour is $3,995 per person, double occupancy. Airfare is not included.

Finley, the Season 3 winner of the “Next Food Network Star,” will be back Sunday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. Her demonstration takes place at 11 a.m. on the Culinary Stage.

Finley was followed by chef Brian Malarkey, creator and owner of five San Diego restaurants and a judge-mentor on ABC’s “The Taste.” In between preparing shrimp and grits, he tossed out a number of useful tips: “There are no rules in cooking” and “If you’re trying to sell a house, bake some bread.”


Travel Show: Cooking with chefs Amy Finley and Brian Malarkey

High-energy Amy Finley gave a fast-paced cooking demonstration Saturday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. (She returns at 11 a.m. Sunday (today) for a second demo.) Finley, a classically trained cook and the author of “How to Eat a Small Country,” prepared lapin a la moutarde, or rabbit with mustard, a traditional Burgundian dish.

She’s an advocate for getting people to eat more rabbit but admitted that it’s tricky thinking of a “fluffy bunny and what you’re having for dinner.”

Despite a badly sliced thumb (a hazard of working with sharp objects), Finley proceeded with a how-to session in cutting up rabbit, then prepared the lapin, followed by a session with what she called the “food guillotine,” or the mandoline, which she fearlessly used to slice potatoes.

From May 15-24, Finley will lead a 10-day Springtime in Paris/Adventure by the Book tour around Paris and the French countryside. Highlights of the tour include nine days deluxe lodging in Paris and Burgundy, a cooking class and dinner with former European editor of Gourmet magazine, Alec Lobrano, author of “Hungry for Paris.” Cost for the tour is $3,995 per person, double occupancy. Airfare is not included.

Finley, the Season 3 winner of the “Next Food Network Star,” will be back Sunday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. Her demonstration takes place at 11 a.m. on the Culinary Stage.

Finley was followed by chef Brian Malarkey, creator and owner of five San Diego restaurants and a judge-mentor on ABC’s “The Taste.” In between preparing shrimp and grits, he tossed out a number of useful tips: “There are no rules in cooking” and “If you’re trying to sell a house, bake some bread.”


Travel Show: Cooking with chefs Amy Finley and Brian Malarkey

High-energy Amy Finley gave a fast-paced cooking demonstration Saturday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. (She returns at 11 a.m. Sunday (today) for a second demo.) Finley, a classically trained cook and the author of “How to Eat a Small Country,” prepared lapin a la moutarde, or rabbit with mustard, a traditional Burgundian dish.

She’s an advocate for getting people to eat more rabbit but admitted that it’s tricky thinking of a “fluffy bunny and what you’re having for dinner.”

Despite a badly sliced thumb (a hazard of working with sharp objects), Finley proceeded with a how-to session in cutting up rabbit, then prepared the lapin, followed by a session with what she called the “food guillotine,” or the mandoline, which she fearlessly used to slice potatoes.

From May 15-24, Finley will lead a 10-day Springtime in Paris/Adventure by the Book tour around Paris and the French countryside. Highlights of the tour include nine days deluxe lodging in Paris and Burgundy, a cooking class and dinner with former European editor of Gourmet magazine, Alec Lobrano, author of “Hungry for Paris.” Cost for the tour is $3,995 per person, double occupancy. Airfare is not included.

Finley, the Season 3 winner of the “Next Food Network Star,” will be back Sunday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. Her demonstration takes place at 11 a.m. on the Culinary Stage.

Finley was followed by chef Brian Malarkey, creator and owner of five San Diego restaurants and a judge-mentor on ABC’s “The Taste.” In between preparing shrimp and grits, he tossed out a number of useful tips: “There are no rules in cooking” and “If you’re trying to sell a house, bake some bread.”


Travel Show: Cooking with chefs Amy Finley and Brian Malarkey

High-energy Amy Finley gave a fast-paced cooking demonstration Saturday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. (She returns at 11 a.m. Sunday (today) for a second demo.) Finley, a classically trained cook and the author of “How to Eat a Small Country,” prepared lapin a la moutarde, or rabbit with mustard, a traditional Burgundian dish.

She’s an advocate for getting people to eat more rabbit but admitted that it’s tricky thinking of a “fluffy bunny and what you’re having for dinner.”

Despite a badly sliced thumb (a hazard of working with sharp objects), Finley proceeded with a how-to session in cutting up rabbit, then prepared the lapin, followed by a session with what she called the “food guillotine,” or the mandoline, which she fearlessly used to slice potatoes.

From May 15-24, Finley will lead a 10-day Springtime in Paris/Adventure by the Book tour around Paris and the French countryside. Highlights of the tour include nine days deluxe lodging in Paris and Burgundy, a cooking class and dinner with former European editor of Gourmet magazine, Alec Lobrano, author of “Hungry for Paris.” Cost for the tour is $3,995 per person, double occupancy. Airfare is not included.

Finley, the Season 3 winner of the “Next Food Network Star,” will be back Sunday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. Her demonstration takes place at 11 a.m. on the Culinary Stage.

Finley was followed by chef Brian Malarkey, creator and owner of five San Diego restaurants and a judge-mentor on ABC’s “The Taste.” In between preparing shrimp and grits, he tossed out a number of useful tips: “There are no rules in cooking” and “If you’re trying to sell a house, bake some bread.”


Watch the video: Μαγειρική..εν πλω! (November 2021).