Traditional recipes

America Is in Love with Prosecco

America Is in Love with Prosecco

I have been to so many parties and receptions recently where the first wine I was offered was a glass of prosecco. It is Italy’s single biggest wine category and it is not hard to see why.

First, choice is limited within sparkling wine styles and prosecco is half the price of major Champagnes (and a tenth or less of the price of the most exclusive examples of Champagne). Most prosecco sell for $15 or less.

Second, it is immediately easy to like. It doesn’t have to be sold as something that will “grow on you.” The wine is a straw yellow color, light and fruity with aromas of white flowers and green apple and citrus fruits being the dominant notes in the flavor.

Third, it is flexible. It can be the toasting wine, it can be paired with seafood, poultry, or creamy pasta dishes, and it can be inthe body of a cocktail.

Fourth, it is reliable. Vintages, cork taint, and other similar things just don’t come up in discussions of the wine. It is made to be consumed young.

With all this permissiveness, prosecco may sound like a wine without rules. However, that would be wrong. Here are some “facts on the ground” about prosecco.

Prosecco is made with 85 percent or more of the Glera grape. A specific list of other varieties constrains how far the nose and palate of the wine can deviate from the reference set by Glera. The best-known of those other varieties are chardonnay, pinot grigio, and pinot noir.

Prosecco must be a white wine, which impacts the production method. This is illustrated by the fact that one of the permitted grape varieties is pinot nero (pinot noir), the backbone of rosé sparkling wines in Champagne, Franciacorta (Italy), and the New World. In fact, Franciacorta rosé must contain at least 15 percent pinot nero alongside white varieties. Thus, the magic 85/15 percent blend of white/red grapes to get the rosé of Franciacorta is within the grape blend rules of prosecco.

To prevent a rosé emerging, the red grapes must be taken off the skin before the must becomes impregnated with skin color. On store shelves you frequently see bottles of rosé alongside prosecco, even made by the same winery. A close look shows that they are not labeled prosecco. For obvious reasons, the decision not to allow a prosecco rosé was controversial among growers and winemakers.

Sparkling prosecco has three sweetness categories. In increasing order of sweetness they are: brut (less than 12 grammes of sugar/litre), extra dry (between 12 and 17), and dry, also known as demi-sec (17 to 32 grammes).

Prosecco is typically produced in a different way than Champagne. The secondary fermentation takes place in a large tank, rather than in the bottle. This is known as the Martinotti method (and also as the Charmat method). This has several differences. First, it is simply cheaper, lowering the cost of the final product. Second, it allows an inventory to be kept in tank after large harvests to be bottled on demand. Third, the absence of ageing on the yeast drastically alters the organoleptic properties of the wine. It is fresh and fruity rather than yeasty and autolysised. Fourth, the bubbles are larger and less long-lived than those in a Champagne method wine. This seems to be a result of the Martinotti method.

One exception to the above is that the Champagne method of production is allowed for the DOCG-designated wines. If it is used, the phrase Metodo Classico will almost certainly appear on the front label.

What are good examples of prosecco in the U.S. market? Here are three:

The Bisol Jeio Prosecco DOC is straw yellow with light green hints and a fruity bouquet of apple, light hints of apricot, and citron. The aroma is floral, fresh, and pleasant, reminiscent of white and meadow flowers. The flavor is elegant on the palate, soft, and features a fruity aftertaste. Jeio's fresh, youthful character pairs well with light food and canapés and is an ideal start to a meal or simply as an aperitif.

The Mionetto Prosecco Brut DOC has an intense fruity bouquet with a hint of golden apples. It is very dry, fresh, light in body, and well-balanced. This wine is perfect alone as an aperitif or as a delightful complement to appetizers such as prosciutto or mild cheese.

With a pale lemon color, the Villa Sandi Prosecco DOC boasts aromas of apple, pear and a touch floral; dry and light in body with flavors of peach, lemon and lime, fresh apple, and melon. An excellent aperitif to accompany savory hors’ d’oeuvres or steamed shellfish.

I have been personally impressed with Mionetto among prosecco producers. They produce a range of wines retailing from $9 to $27 of steadily increasing quality. The premium wines are especially good examples of the art of the possible within the Martinotti method.

With the holidays approaching, prosecco is going to be on a lot of people’s agendas.


Ivy Mix’s ‘Spirits of Latin America’ Is a Tribute to the Region in 100 Recipes

As the head bartender and co-owner of the Brooklyn-based bar, Leyenda, Ivy Mix has been an influential force in some of the country’s most iconic cocktail bars ever since she touched down in New York City. But it’s the four years she spent living in South America that have been an unwavering source of inspiration for the James Beard Award-nominated entrepreneur.

In her new book, “Spirits of Latin America,” Mix pays tribute to her immense love of the diverse cultures and spirits found throughout Latin America through a collection of more than 100 cocktail recipes, many of which originated at Leyenda. As Mix tells VinePair, “I believe that distillates are fantastic cultural representations of their homes. ‘Spirits of Latin America’ is me putting into writing these beliefs.”

Mix hopes her book exposes cocktail enthusiasts to a wider world of spirits, noting, “Not that many people are making cocktails out of things like pisco or cachaça. Celebrating these spirits and their cultures is what makes them unique.”

Everything You Can Order Online To Stock Your Home Bar For The Long Haul

Featured in Mix’s book is the Shadow Boxer, a twist on the Negroni and a mainstay at Leyenda, in which cachaça, a Brazilian spirit made from fermented sugarcane juice, is substituted for the more traditional gin. In addition to dry vermouth and Campari, the drink includes a welcome balance of apricot eau de vie and pamplemousse liqueur.

Mix also highlights the versatility of these liquors for a modern cocktail menu. In the False Alarm, Peruvian pisco complements Campari, lemon juice, and raspberry syrup, which is topped off with Champagne. The Pancho Perico takes rhum agricole to another level by mixing it with bourbon, sherry, pineapple juice, and a mildly spicy and sweet poblano syrup.

“People know about gin, whiskey, vodka, etc., but there was a glaring hole about spirits from the so-called ‘New World’ of the south,” she says. “If you like these spirits, you should know about them.”

The Shadow Boxer Recipe

“This cocktail started as yet another Negroni variation, but ended up something very much its own thing and a staple for us at Leyenda. The cachaça I selected here is a blend of an unaged silver with a touch of European oak, which lends itself well to the bitter sweetness of the Campari. The dry vermouth carries the apricot eau de vie to bring out the cachaça’s rich fruit even further, and the pamplemousse liqueur comes in to link everything back to the citrus of the Campari.”

The False Alarm Recipe

“When I lived in Peru for a short stint in college, we drank a bright red, sweet cola called Kola Inglesa with pisco whenever we went out. It was certainly a college student’s sugary hangover delight but when I started to dive deeper into cocktail creation, I remembered it fondly and made up this fancier version. It really only resembles the Kola Inglesa in its red appearance, as the bitterness of the Campari gives it a different flavor altogether: fresher and more nuanced.”

The Pancho Perico Recipe

“This drink, by Shannon Ponche of Leyenda, is a tall, slightly spicy stunner. We traditionally garnish it with a banana leaf for visual effect, but it’s not necessary. The bright green color speaks for itself. This cocktail proved itself a gateway to rhum agricole. If you’re perhaps skeptical of its deliciousness, whip this up to change your mind.”

Get these recipes and more in VinePair’s searchable cocktail database.

This story is a part of VP Pro, our free content platform and newsletter for the drinks industry, covering wine, beer, and liquor — and beyond. Sign up for VP Pro now!


Ivy Mix’s ‘Spirits of Latin America’ Is a Tribute to the Region in 100 Recipes

As the head bartender and co-owner of the Brooklyn-based bar, Leyenda, Ivy Mix has been an influential force in some of the country’s most iconic cocktail bars ever since she touched down in New York City. But it’s the four years she spent living in South America that have been an unwavering source of inspiration for the James Beard Award-nominated entrepreneur.

In her new book, “Spirits of Latin America,” Mix pays tribute to her immense love of the diverse cultures and spirits found throughout Latin America through a collection of more than 100 cocktail recipes, many of which originated at Leyenda. As Mix tells VinePair, “I believe that distillates are fantastic cultural representations of their homes. ‘Spirits of Latin America’ is me putting into writing these beliefs.”

Mix hopes her book exposes cocktail enthusiasts to a wider world of spirits, noting, “Not that many people are making cocktails out of things like pisco or cachaça. Celebrating these spirits and their cultures is what makes them unique.”

Everything You Can Order Online To Stock Your Home Bar For The Long Haul

Featured in Mix’s book is the Shadow Boxer, a twist on the Negroni and a mainstay at Leyenda, in which cachaça, a Brazilian spirit made from fermented sugarcane juice, is substituted for the more traditional gin. In addition to dry vermouth and Campari, the drink includes a welcome balance of apricot eau de vie and pamplemousse liqueur.

Mix also highlights the versatility of these liquors for a modern cocktail menu. In the False Alarm, Peruvian pisco complements Campari, lemon juice, and raspberry syrup, which is topped off with Champagne. The Pancho Perico takes rhum agricole to another level by mixing it with bourbon, sherry, pineapple juice, and a mildly spicy and sweet poblano syrup.

“People know about gin, whiskey, vodka, etc., but there was a glaring hole about spirits from the so-called ‘New World’ of the south,” she says. “If you like these spirits, you should know about them.”

The Shadow Boxer Recipe

“This cocktail started as yet another Negroni variation, but ended up something very much its own thing and a staple for us at Leyenda. The cachaça I selected here is a blend of an unaged silver with a touch of European oak, which lends itself well to the bitter sweetness of the Campari. The dry vermouth carries the apricot eau de vie to bring out the cachaça’s rich fruit even further, and the pamplemousse liqueur comes in to link everything back to the citrus of the Campari.”

The False Alarm Recipe

“When I lived in Peru for a short stint in college, we drank a bright red, sweet cola called Kola Inglesa with pisco whenever we went out. It was certainly a college student’s sugary hangover delight but when I started to dive deeper into cocktail creation, I remembered it fondly and made up this fancier version. It really only resembles the Kola Inglesa in its red appearance, as the bitterness of the Campari gives it a different flavor altogether: fresher and more nuanced.”

The Pancho Perico Recipe

“This drink, by Shannon Ponche of Leyenda, is a tall, slightly spicy stunner. We traditionally garnish it with a banana leaf for visual effect, but it’s not necessary. The bright green color speaks for itself. This cocktail proved itself a gateway to rhum agricole. If you’re perhaps skeptical of its deliciousness, whip this up to change your mind.”

Get these recipes and more in VinePair’s searchable cocktail database.

This story is a part of VP Pro, our free content platform and newsletter for the drinks industry, covering wine, beer, and liquor — and beyond. Sign up for VP Pro now!


Ivy Mix’s ‘Spirits of Latin America’ Is a Tribute to the Region in 100 Recipes

As the head bartender and co-owner of the Brooklyn-based bar, Leyenda, Ivy Mix has been an influential force in some of the country’s most iconic cocktail bars ever since she touched down in New York City. But it’s the four years she spent living in South America that have been an unwavering source of inspiration for the James Beard Award-nominated entrepreneur.

In her new book, “Spirits of Latin America,” Mix pays tribute to her immense love of the diverse cultures and spirits found throughout Latin America through a collection of more than 100 cocktail recipes, many of which originated at Leyenda. As Mix tells VinePair, “I believe that distillates are fantastic cultural representations of their homes. ‘Spirits of Latin America’ is me putting into writing these beliefs.”

Mix hopes her book exposes cocktail enthusiasts to a wider world of spirits, noting, “Not that many people are making cocktails out of things like pisco or cachaça. Celebrating these spirits and their cultures is what makes them unique.”

Everything You Can Order Online To Stock Your Home Bar For The Long Haul

Featured in Mix’s book is the Shadow Boxer, a twist on the Negroni and a mainstay at Leyenda, in which cachaça, a Brazilian spirit made from fermented sugarcane juice, is substituted for the more traditional gin. In addition to dry vermouth and Campari, the drink includes a welcome balance of apricot eau de vie and pamplemousse liqueur.

Mix also highlights the versatility of these liquors for a modern cocktail menu. In the False Alarm, Peruvian pisco complements Campari, lemon juice, and raspberry syrup, which is topped off with Champagne. The Pancho Perico takes rhum agricole to another level by mixing it with bourbon, sherry, pineapple juice, and a mildly spicy and sweet poblano syrup.

“People know about gin, whiskey, vodka, etc., but there was a glaring hole about spirits from the so-called ‘New World’ of the south,” she says. “If you like these spirits, you should know about them.”

The Shadow Boxer Recipe

“This cocktail started as yet another Negroni variation, but ended up something very much its own thing and a staple for us at Leyenda. The cachaça I selected here is a blend of an unaged silver with a touch of European oak, which lends itself well to the bitter sweetness of the Campari. The dry vermouth carries the apricot eau de vie to bring out the cachaça’s rich fruit even further, and the pamplemousse liqueur comes in to link everything back to the citrus of the Campari.”

The False Alarm Recipe

“When I lived in Peru for a short stint in college, we drank a bright red, sweet cola called Kola Inglesa with pisco whenever we went out. It was certainly a college student’s sugary hangover delight but when I started to dive deeper into cocktail creation, I remembered it fondly and made up this fancier version. It really only resembles the Kola Inglesa in its red appearance, as the bitterness of the Campari gives it a different flavor altogether: fresher and more nuanced.”

The Pancho Perico Recipe

“This drink, by Shannon Ponche of Leyenda, is a tall, slightly spicy stunner. We traditionally garnish it with a banana leaf for visual effect, but it’s not necessary. The bright green color speaks for itself. This cocktail proved itself a gateway to rhum agricole. If you’re perhaps skeptical of its deliciousness, whip this up to change your mind.”

Get these recipes and more in VinePair’s searchable cocktail database.

This story is a part of VP Pro, our free content platform and newsletter for the drinks industry, covering wine, beer, and liquor — and beyond. Sign up for VP Pro now!


Ivy Mix’s ‘Spirits of Latin America’ Is a Tribute to the Region in 100 Recipes

As the head bartender and co-owner of the Brooklyn-based bar, Leyenda, Ivy Mix has been an influential force in some of the country’s most iconic cocktail bars ever since she touched down in New York City. But it’s the four years she spent living in South America that have been an unwavering source of inspiration for the James Beard Award-nominated entrepreneur.

In her new book, “Spirits of Latin America,” Mix pays tribute to her immense love of the diverse cultures and spirits found throughout Latin America through a collection of more than 100 cocktail recipes, many of which originated at Leyenda. As Mix tells VinePair, “I believe that distillates are fantastic cultural representations of their homes. ‘Spirits of Latin America’ is me putting into writing these beliefs.”

Mix hopes her book exposes cocktail enthusiasts to a wider world of spirits, noting, “Not that many people are making cocktails out of things like pisco or cachaça. Celebrating these spirits and their cultures is what makes them unique.”

Everything You Can Order Online To Stock Your Home Bar For The Long Haul

Featured in Mix’s book is the Shadow Boxer, a twist on the Negroni and a mainstay at Leyenda, in which cachaça, a Brazilian spirit made from fermented sugarcane juice, is substituted for the more traditional gin. In addition to dry vermouth and Campari, the drink includes a welcome balance of apricot eau de vie and pamplemousse liqueur.

Mix also highlights the versatility of these liquors for a modern cocktail menu. In the False Alarm, Peruvian pisco complements Campari, lemon juice, and raspberry syrup, which is topped off with Champagne. The Pancho Perico takes rhum agricole to another level by mixing it with bourbon, sherry, pineapple juice, and a mildly spicy and sweet poblano syrup.

“People know about gin, whiskey, vodka, etc., but there was a glaring hole about spirits from the so-called ‘New World’ of the south,” she says. “If you like these spirits, you should know about them.”

The Shadow Boxer Recipe

“This cocktail started as yet another Negroni variation, but ended up something very much its own thing and a staple for us at Leyenda. The cachaça I selected here is a blend of an unaged silver with a touch of European oak, which lends itself well to the bitter sweetness of the Campari. The dry vermouth carries the apricot eau de vie to bring out the cachaça’s rich fruit even further, and the pamplemousse liqueur comes in to link everything back to the citrus of the Campari.”

The False Alarm Recipe

“When I lived in Peru for a short stint in college, we drank a bright red, sweet cola called Kola Inglesa with pisco whenever we went out. It was certainly a college student’s sugary hangover delight but when I started to dive deeper into cocktail creation, I remembered it fondly and made up this fancier version. It really only resembles the Kola Inglesa in its red appearance, as the bitterness of the Campari gives it a different flavor altogether: fresher and more nuanced.”

The Pancho Perico Recipe

“This drink, by Shannon Ponche of Leyenda, is a tall, slightly spicy stunner. We traditionally garnish it with a banana leaf for visual effect, but it’s not necessary. The bright green color speaks for itself. This cocktail proved itself a gateway to rhum agricole. If you’re perhaps skeptical of its deliciousness, whip this up to change your mind.”

Get these recipes and more in VinePair’s searchable cocktail database.

This story is a part of VP Pro, our free content platform and newsletter for the drinks industry, covering wine, beer, and liquor — and beyond. Sign up for VP Pro now!


Ivy Mix’s ‘Spirits of Latin America’ Is a Tribute to the Region in 100 Recipes

As the head bartender and co-owner of the Brooklyn-based bar, Leyenda, Ivy Mix has been an influential force in some of the country’s most iconic cocktail bars ever since she touched down in New York City. But it’s the four years she spent living in South America that have been an unwavering source of inspiration for the James Beard Award-nominated entrepreneur.

In her new book, “Spirits of Latin America,” Mix pays tribute to her immense love of the diverse cultures and spirits found throughout Latin America through a collection of more than 100 cocktail recipes, many of which originated at Leyenda. As Mix tells VinePair, “I believe that distillates are fantastic cultural representations of their homes. ‘Spirits of Latin America’ is me putting into writing these beliefs.”

Mix hopes her book exposes cocktail enthusiasts to a wider world of spirits, noting, “Not that many people are making cocktails out of things like pisco or cachaça. Celebrating these spirits and their cultures is what makes them unique.”

Everything You Can Order Online To Stock Your Home Bar For The Long Haul

Featured in Mix’s book is the Shadow Boxer, a twist on the Negroni and a mainstay at Leyenda, in which cachaça, a Brazilian spirit made from fermented sugarcane juice, is substituted for the more traditional gin. In addition to dry vermouth and Campari, the drink includes a welcome balance of apricot eau de vie and pamplemousse liqueur.

Mix also highlights the versatility of these liquors for a modern cocktail menu. In the False Alarm, Peruvian pisco complements Campari, lemon juice, and raspberry syrup, which is topped off with Champagne. The Pancho Perico takes rhum agricole to another level by mixing it with bourbon, sherry, pineapple juice, and a mildly spicy and sweet poblano syrup.

“People know about gin, whiskey, vodka, etc., but there was a glaring hole about spirits from the so-called ‘New World’ of the south,” she says. “If you like these spirits, you should know about them.”

The Shadow Boxer Recipe

“This cocktail started as yet another Negroni variation, but ended up something very much its own thing and a staple for us at Leyenda. The cachaça I selected here is a blend of an unaged silver with a touch of European oak, which lends itself well to the bitter sweetness of the Campari. The dry vermouth carries the apricot eau de vie to bring out the cachaça’s rich fruit even further, and the pamplemousse liqueur comes in to link everything back to the citrus of the Campari.”

The False Alarm Recipe

“When I lived in Peru for a short stint in college, we drank a bright red, sweet cola called Kola Inglesa with pisco whenever we went out. It was certainly a college student’s sugary hangover delight but when I started to dive deeper into cocktail creation, I remembered it fondly and made up this fancier version. It really only resembles the Kola Inglesa in its red appearance, as the bitterness of the Campari gives it a different flavor altogether: fresher and more nuanced.”

The Pancho Perico Recipe

“This drink, by Shannon Ponche of Leyenda, is a tall, slightly spicy stunner. We traditionally garnish it with a banana leaf for visual effect, but it’s not necessary. The bright green color speaks for itself. This cocktail proved itself a gateway to rhum agricole. If you’re perhaps skeptical of its deliciousness, whip this up to change your mind.”

Get these recipes and more in VinePair’s searchable cocktail database.

This story is a part of VP Pro, our free content platform and newsletter for the drinks industry, covering wine, beer, and liquor — and beyond. Sign up for VP Pro now!


Ivy Mix’s ‘Spirits of Latin America’ Is a Tribute to the Region in 100 Recipes

As the head bartender and co-owner of the Brooklyn-based bar, Leyenda, Ivy Mix has been an influential force in some of the country’s most iconic cocktail bars ever since she touched down in New York City. But it’s the four years she spent living in South America that have been an unwavering source of inspiration for the James Beard Award-nominated entrepreneur.

In her new book, “Spirits of Latin America,” Mix pays tribute to her immense love of the diverse cultures and spirits found throughout Latin America through a collection of more than 100 cocktail recipes, many of which originated at Leyenda. As Mix tells VinePair, “I believe that distillates are fantastic cultural representations of their homes. ‘Spirits of Latin America’ is me putting into writing these beliefs.”

Mix hopes her book exposes cocktail enthusiasts to a wider world of spirits, noting, “Not that many people are making cocktails out of things like pisco or cachaça. Celebrating these spirits and their cultures is what makes them unique.”

Everything You Can Order Online To Stock Your Home Bar For The Long Haul

Featured in Mix’s book is the Shadow Boxer, a twist on the Negroni and a mainstay at Leyenda, in which cachaça, a Brazilian spirit made from fermented sugarcane juice, is substituted for the more traditional gin. In addition to dry vermouth and Campari, the drink includes a welcome balance of apricot eau de vie and pamplemousse liqueur.

Mix also highlights the versatility of these liquors for a modern cocktail menu. In the False Alarm, Peruvian pisco complements Campari, lemon juice, and raspberry syrup, which is topped off with Champagne. The Pancho Perico takes rhum agricole to another level by mixing it with bourbon, sherry, pineapple juice, and a mildly spicy and sweet poblano syrup.

“People know about gin, whiskey, vodka, etc., but there was a glaring hole about spirits from the so-called ‘New World’ of the south,” she says. “If you like these spirits, you should know about them.”

The Shadow Boxer Recipe

“This cocktail started as yet another Negroni variation, but ended up something very much its own thing and a staple for us at Leyenda. The cachaça I selected here is a blend of an unaged silver with a touch of European oak, which lends itself well to the bitter sweetness of the Campari. The dry vermouth carries the apricot eau de vie to bring out the cachaça’s rich fruit even further, and the pamplemousse liqueur comes in to link everything back to the citrus of the Campari.”

The False Alarm Recipe

“When I lived in Peru for a short stint in college, we drank a bright red, sweet cola called Kola Inglesa with pisco whenever we went out. It was certainly a college student’s sugary hangover delight but when I started to dive deeper into cocktail creation, I remembered it fondly and made up this fancier version. It really only resembles the Kola Inglesa in its red appearance, as the bitterness of the Campari gives it a different flavor altogether: fresher and more nuanced.”

The Pancho Perico Recipe

“This drink, by Shannon Ponche of Leyenda, is a tall, slightly spicy stunner. We traditionally garnish it with a banana leaf for visual effect, but it’s not necessary. The bright green color speaks for itself. This cocktail proved itself a gateway to rhum agricole. If you’re perhaps skeptical of its deliciousness, whip this up to change your mind.”

Get these recipes and more in VinePair’s searchable cocktail database.

This story is a part of VP Pro, our free content platform and newsletter for the drinks industry, covering wine, beer, and liquor — and beyond. Sign up for VP Pro now!


Ivy Mix’s ‘Spirits of Latin America’ Is a Tribute to the Region in 100 Recipes

As the head bartender and co-owner of the Brooklyn-based bar, Leyenda, Ivy Mix has been an influential force in some of the country’s most iconic cocktail bars ever since she touched down in New York City. But it’s the four years she spent living in South America that have been an unwavering source of inspiration for the James Beard Award-nominated entrepreneur.

In her new book, “Spirits of Latin America,” Mix pays tribute to her immense love of the diverse cultures and spirits found throughout Latin America through a collection of more than 100 cocktail recipes, many of which originated at Leyenda. As Mix tells VinePair, “I believe that distillates are fantastic cultural representations of their homes. ‘Spirits of Latin America’ is me putting into writing these beliefs.”

Mix hopes her book exposes cocktail enthusiasts to a wider world of spirits, noting, “Not that many people are making cocktails out of things like pisco or cachaça. Celebrating these spirits and their cultures is what makes them unique.”

Everything You Can Order Online To Stock Your Home Bar For The Long Haul

Featured in Mix’s book is the Shadow Boxer, a twist on the Negroni and a mainstay at Leyenda, in which cachaça, a Brazilian spirit made from fermented sugarcane juice, is substituted for the more traditional gin. In addition to dry vermouth and Campari, the drink includes a welcome balance of apricot eau de vie and pamplemousse liqueur.

Mix also highlights the versatility of these liquors for a modern cocktail menu. In the False Alarm, Peruvian pisco complements Campari, lemon juice, and raspberry syrup, which is topped off with Champagne. The Pancho Perico takes rhum agricole to another level by mixing it with bourbon, sherry, pineapple juice, and a mildly spicy and sweet poblano syrup.

“People know about gin, whiskey, vodka, etc., but there was a glaring hole about spirits from the so-called ‘New World’ of the south,” she says. “If you like these spirits, you should know about them.”

The Shadow Boxer Recipe

“This cocktail started as yet another Negroni variation, but ended up something very much its own thing and a staple for us at Leyenda. The cachaça I selected here is a blend of an unaged silver with a touch of European oak, which lends itself well to the bitter sweetness of the Campari. The dry vermouth carries the apricot eau de vie to bring out the cachaça’s rich fruit even further, and the pamplemousse liqueur comes in to link everything back to the citrus of the Campari.”

The False Alarm Recipe

“When I lived in Peru for a short stint in college, we drank a bright red, sweet cola called Kola Inglesa with pisco whenever we went out. It was certainly a college student’s sugary hangover delight but when I started to dive deeper into cocktail creation, I remembered it fondly and made up this fancier version. It really only resembles the Kola Inglesa in its red appearance, as the bitterness of the Campari gives it a different flavor altogether: fresher and more nuanced.”

The Pancho Perico Recipe

“This drink, by Shannon Ponche of Leyenda, is a tall, slightly spicy stunner. We traditionally garnish it with a banana leaf for visual effect, but it’s not necessary. The bright green color speaks for itself. This cocktail proved itself a gateway to rhum agricole. If you’re perhaps skeptical of its deliciousness, whip this up to change your mind.”

Get these recipes and more in VinePair’s searchable cocktail database.

This story is a part of VP Pro, our free content platform and newsletter for the drinks industry, covering wine, beer, and liquor — and beyond. Sign up for VP Pro now!


Ivy Mix’s ‘Spirits of Latin America’ Is a Tribute to the Region in 100 Recipes

As the head bartender and co-owner of the Brooklyn-based bar, Leyenda, Ivy Mix has been an influential force in some of the country’s most iconic cocktail bars ever since she touched down in New York City. But it’s the four years she spent living in South America that have been an unwavering source of inspiration for the James Beard Award-nominated entrepreneur.

In her new book, “Spirits of Latin America,” Mix pays tribute to her immense love of the diverse cultures and spirits found throughout Latin America through a collection of more than 100 cocktail recipes, many of which originated at Leyenda. As Mix tells VinePair, “I believe that distillates are fantastic cultural representations of their homes. ‘Spirits of Latin America’ is me putting into writing these beliefs.”

Mix hopes her book exposes cocktail enthusiasts to a wider world of spirits, noting, “Not that many people are making cocktails out of things like pisco or cachaça. Celebrating these spirits and their cultures is what makes them unique.”

Everything You Can Order Online To Stock Your Home Bar For The Long Haul

Featured in Mix’s book is the Shadow Boxer, a twist on the Negroni and a mainstay at Leyenda, in which cachaça, a Brazilian spirit made from fermented sugarcane juice, is substituted for the more traditional gin. In addition to dry vermouth and Campari, the drink includes a welcome balance of apricot eau de vie and pamplemousse liqueur.

Mix also highlights the versatility of these liquors for a modern cocktail menu. In the False Alarm, Peruvian pisco complements Campari, lemon juice, and raspberry syrup, which is topped off with Champagne. The Pancho Perico takes rhum agricole to another level by mixing it with bourbon, sherry, pineapple juice, and a mildly spicy and sweet poblano syrup.

“People know about gin, whiskey, vodka, etc., but there was a glaring hole about spirits from the so-called ‘New World’ of the south,” she says. “If you like these spirits, you should know about them.”

The Shadow Boxer Recipe

“This cocktail started as yet another Negroni variation, but ended up something very much its own thing and a staple for us at Leyenda. The cachaça I selected here is a blend of an unaged silver with a touch of European oak, which lends itself well to the bitter sweetness of the Campari. The dry vermouth carries the apricot eau de vie to bring out the cachaça’s rich fruit even further, and the pamplemousse liqueur comes in to link everything back to the citrus of the Campari.”

The False Alarm Recipe

“When I lived in Peru for a short stint in college, we drank a bright red, sweet cola called Kola Inglesa with pisco whenever we went out. It was certainly a college student’s sugary hangover delight but when I started to dive deeper into cocktail creation, I remembered it fondly and made up this fancier version. It really only resembles the Kola Inglesa in its red appearance, as the bitterness of the Campari gives it a different flavor altogether: fresher and more nuanced.”

The Pancho Perico Recipe

“This drink, by Shannon Ponche of Leyenda, is a tall, slightly spicy stunner. We traditionally garnish it with a banana leaf for visual effect, but it’s not necessary. The bright green color speaks for itself. This cocktail proved itself a gateway to rhum agricole. If you’re perhaps skeptical of its deliciousness, whip this up to change your mind.”

Get these recipes and more in VinePair’s searchable cocktail database.

This story is a part of VP Pro, our free content platform and newsletter for the drinks industry, covering wine, beer, and liquor — and beyond. Sign up for VP Pro now!


Ivy Mix’s ‘Spirits of Latin America’ Is a Tribute to the Region in 100 Recipes

As the head bartender and co-owner of the Brooklyn-based bar, Leyenda, Ivy Mix has been an influential force in some of the country’s most iconic cocktail bars ever since she touched down in New York City. But it’s the four years she spent living in South America that have been an unwavering source of inspiration for the James Beard Award-nominated entrepreneur.

In her new book, “Spirits of Latin America,” Mix pays tribute to her immense love of the diverse cultures and spirits found throughout Latin America through a collection of more than 100 cocktail recipes, many of which originated at Leyenda. As Mix tells VinePair, “I believe that distillates are fantastic cultural representations of their homes. ‘Spirits of Latin America’ is me putting into writing these beliefs.”

Mix hopes her book exposes cocktail enthusiasts to a wider world of spirits, noting, “Not that many people are making cocktails out of things like pisco or cachaça. Celebrating these spirits and their cultures is what makes them unique.”

Everything You Can Order Online To Stock Your Home Bar For The Long Haul

Featured in Mix’s book is the Shadow Boxer, a twist on the Negroni and a mainstay at Leyenda, in which cachaça, a Brazilian spirit made from fermented sugarcane juice, is substituted for the more traditional gin. In addition to dry vermouth and Campari, the drink includes a welcome balance of apricot eau de vie and pamplemousse liqueur.

Mix also highlights the versatility of these liquors for a modern cocktail menu. In the False Alarm, Peruvian pisco complements Campari, lemon juice, and raspberry syrup, which is topped off with Champagne. The Pancho Perico takes rhum agricole to another level by mixing it with bourbon, sherry, pineapple juice, and a mildly spicy and sweet poblano syrup.

“People know about gin, whiskey, vodka, etc., but there was a glaring hole about spirits from the so-called ‘New World’ of the south,” she says. “If you like these spirits, you should know about them.”

The Shadow Boxer Recipe

“This cocktail started as yet another Negroni variation, but ended up something very much its own thing and a staple for us at Leyenda. The cachaça I selected here is a blend of an unaged silver with a touch of European oak, which lends itself well to the bitter sweetness of the Campari. The dry vermouth carries the apricot eau de vie to bring out the cachaça’s rich fruit even further, and the pamplemousse liqueur comes in to link everything back to the citrus of the Campari.”

The False Alarm Recipe

“When I lived in Peru for a short stint in college, we drank a bright red, sweet cola called Kola Inglesa with pisco whenever we went out. It was certainly a college student’s sugary hangover delight but when I started to dive deeper into cocktail creation, I remembered it fondly and made up this fancier version. It really only resembles the Kola Inglesa in its red appearance, as the bitterness of the Campari gives it a different flavor altogether: fresher and more nuanced.”

The Pancho Perico Recipe

“This drink, by Shannon Ponche of Leyenda, is a tall, slightly spicy stunner. We traditionally garnish it with a banana leaf for visual effect, but it’s not necessary. The bright green color speaks for itself. This cocktail proved itself a gateway to rhum agricole. If you’re perhaps skeptical of its deliciousness, whip this up to change your mind.”

Get these recipes and more in VinePair’s searchable cocktail database.

This story is a part of VP Pro, our free content platform and newsletter for the drinks industry, covering wine, beer, and liquor — and beyond. Sign up for VP Pro now!


Ivy Mix’s ‘Spirits of Latin America’ Is a Tribute to the Region in 100 Recipes

As the head bartender and co-owner of the Brooklyn-based bar, Leyenda, Ivy Mix has been an influential force in some of the country’s most iconic cocktail bars ever since she touched down in New York City. But it’s the four years she spent living in South America that have been an unwavering source of inspiration for the James Beard Award-nominated entrepreneur.

In her new book, “Spirits of Latin America,” Mix pays tribute to her immense love of the diverse cultures and spirits found throughout Latin America through a collection of more than 100 cocktail recipes, many of which originated at Leyenda. As Mix tells VinePair, “I believe that distillates are fantastic cultural representations of their homes. ‘Spirits of Latin America’ is me putting into writing these beliefs.”

Mix hopes her book exposes cocktail enthusiasts to a wider world of spirits, noting, “Not that many people are making cocktails out of things like pisco or cachaça. Celebrating these spirits and their cultures is what makes them unique.”

Everything You Can Order Online To Stock Your Home Bar For The Long Haul

Featured in Mix’s book is the Shadow Boxer, a twist on the Negroni and a mainstay at Leyenda, in which cachaça, a Brazilian spirit made from fermented sugarcane juice, is substituted for the more traditional gin. In addition to dry vermouth and Campari, the drink includes a welcome balance of apricot eau de vie and pamplemousse liqueur.

Mix also highlights the versatility of these liquors for a modern cocktail menu. In the False Alarm, Peruvian pisco complements Campari, lemon juice, and raspberry syrup, which is topped off with Champagne. The Pancho Perico takes rhum agricole to another level by mixing it with bourbon, sherry, pineapple juice, and a mildly spicy and sweet poblano syrup.

“People know about gin, whiskey, vodka, etc., but there was a glaring hole about spirits from the so-called ‘New World’ of the south,” she says. “If you like these spirits, you should know about them.”

The Shadow Boxer Recipe

“This cocktail started as yet another Negroni variation, but ended up something very much its own thing and a staple for us at Leyenda. The cachaça I selected here is a blend of an unaged silver with a touch of European oak, which lends itself well to the bitter sweetness of the Campari. The dry vermouth carries the apricot eau de vie to bring out the cachaça’s rich fruit even further, and the pamplemousse liqueur comes in to link everything back to the citrus of the Campari.”

The False Alarm Recipe

“When I lived in Peru for a short stint in college, we drank a bright red, sweet cola called Kola Inglesa with pisco whenever we went out. It was certainly a college student’s sugary hangover delight but when I started to dive deeper into cocktail creation, I remembered it fondly and made up this fancier version. It really only resembles the Kola Inglesa in its red appearance, as the bitterness of the Campari gives it a different flavor altogether: fresher and more nuanced.”

The Pancho Perico Recipe

“This drink, by Shannon Ponche of Leyenda, is a tall, slightly spicy stunner. We traditionally garnish it with a banana leaf for visual effect, but it’s not necessary. The bright green color speaks for itself. This cocktail proved itself a gateway to rhum agricole. If you’re perhaps skeptical of its deliciousness, whip this up to change your mind.”

Get these recipes and more in VinePair’s searchable cocktail database.

This story is a part of VP Pro, our free content platform and newsletter for the drinks industry, covering wine, beer, and liquor — and beyond. Sign up for VP Pro now!


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