Traditional recipes

Big Gay Ice Cream Social in Miami

Big Gay Ice Cream Social in Miami

Chef Art Smith raises marriage equality awareness

Washington, D.C. chef Art Smith describes himself as a "gay party monster," which means his Big Gay Ice Cream Social on Saturday, Feb. 23, 2013, at The James Royal Palm hotel in South Beach will be a wild one, while also creating a dialogue about marriage equality in Florida.

As part of the 2013 Food Network South Beach Wine & Food Festival, this social offers ice cream-themed stations for adults and children. Booze-laden ice cream and sorbet floats look like the highlight, specifically the Spicy Ginger Beer Float with coconut ice cream and a dark rum floater.

"The world meets in Miami for hot, sexy, delicious," said Smith in an email to The Daily Meal, "and when you put SOBE Food and Wine in the equation, you got one hell of a fun party."


Big Gay Ice Cream Social in Miami - Recipes

Ice cream isn&rsquot something you ever grow out of&mdashbut that doesn&rsquot mean your tastes can&rsquot change. This summer, graduate beyond ice cream trucks and supermarket popsicles, and seek out the best ice cream shops in your city. From throwback soda fountains to liquid nitrogen ice cream makers&mdashand everything in between&mdashwe&rsquove picked 10 of our favorite scoop shops to see you through the sunny days.

1. MILK BAR, WASHINGTON, D.C.: Milk Bar founder Christina Tosi was recently featured on Chef’s Table Pastry, and for good reason: her kooky creations, from crack pie to compost cookies, have charmed New Yorkers since 2008. Nowadays, D.C. also has several Milk Bar locations to call their very own, complete with local menu exclusives. Browse the shakes, malts, and “milkquakes”—and don’t forget to order a cup of the now-iconic cereal milk soft serve.

2. AMPLE HILLS CREAMERY, NEW YORK: Founded by a former sci-fi screenwriter, and named for a line in a Walt Whitman poem, Ample Hills isn’t your average scoop shop. It serves up wonderfully weird, playful flavors, from Ooey Gooey Butter Cake to the irresistible Sweet As Honey, which is studded with pieces of honeycomb. As a bonus, many of its mix-in ingredients are baked in-house.

3. LULU’S NITROGEN ICE CREAM, MIAMI: Given how high the thermostat can climb in Miami, it only makes sense that Lulu’s ice cream is colder than cold. Order your cup or cone and watch as it freezes in front of your eyes with liquid nitrogen, which billows around the room in white nimbuses. Given that Lulu’s is just minutes from the water’s edge, it’s worth trying one of the shop’s tropical flavors, from guava and goat cheese to piña colada.

4. THE ICE CREAM BAR, SAN FRANCISCO: At the opposite end of the frozen treats spectrum from liquid nitrogen is San Francisco’s old-timey Ice Cream Bar. Wander inside, and you might as well have stepped in a time machine back to the 1930s. At this throwback soda fountain, servers wearing jaunty caps and bowties whip up floats and malts, and create picture-perfect hot fudge and banana sundaes.

5. SWEET ROSE CREAMERY, LA: Los Angeles is a city that takes its ice cream seriously. The fact that Sweet Rose Creamery is widely considered one of the best ice cream shops in town, therefore, is testament to the impeccable quality of its scoops. (It doesn’t hurt that it sources ingredients from the Santa Monica Farmer’s Market.) Stop in to try a range of flavors, which change every month, or go big with an ice cream cake—sharing recommended, but not required.

6. QUEEN OF CREAM, ATLANTA: The dairy is sourced from a family-run farm in Georgia, and the ice cream is made entirely from scratch, in small batches, on-site. No wonder Queen of Cream is one of the most popular ice cream shops around town. On the days when Hotlanta more than lives up to its nickname, settle in for a scoop of brown butter pecan ice cream, or nosh on a homemade ice cream sandwich.

7. BIG GAY ICE CREAM, PHILADELPHIA: Born in New York, Big Gay Ice Cream has since expanded to the City of Brotherly Love. The shop is best known for its soft serve, which is especially good when coated in rainbow sprinkles other decadent offerings range from hot fudge sundaes to Nutella milkshakes. Its rainbow ceilings and unicorn-bedecked front window are nearly as festive as its frozen treats.

8. SALT & STRAW, PORTLAND: Salt & Straw frequently collaborates with esteemed local chefs on its ice creams, which means you can expect to encounter some pretty inventive flavors. Think: duck crackling and cherry preserves ice cream, or scoops mixed with ras el hanout and pickled rose petal jam. After something slightly more pedestrian? Don’t worry its chocolate gooey brownie and double-fold vanilla are also killer.

9. JENI’S SPLENDID ICE CREAMS, CHICAGO: Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams was born several decades ago in Ohio, when founder Jeni Britton Bauer decided to take her hobby—casually churning up ice cream for her friends—pro. Today, Jeni’s operates a number of scoop shops, with five in Chicago alone. That means five different opportunities to try flavors like churro, salted honey pie, or brandied banana brûlée.

10. FRANKIE & JO’S, SEATTLE: Frankie and Jo’s makes ice cream that’s so creamy, so decadent, so gosh-dang delicious that you’d be surprised to discover it’s exclusively plant-based. One of the best ice cream shops around, whether you’re a vegan or otherwise, Frankie & Jo’s makes clever use of coconut cream and nut milk when crafting ice cream recipes. Their waffle cones and toppings are all vegan and gluten-free, too.

1. MILK BAR, WASHINGTON, D.C.: Milk Bar founder Christina Tosi was recently featured on Chef’s Table Pastry, and for good reason: her kooky creations, from crack pie to compost cookies, have charmed New Yorkers since 2008. Nowadays, D.C. also has several Milk Bar locations to call their very own, complete with local menu exclusives. Browse the shakes, malts, and “milkquakes”—and don’t forget to order a cup of the now-iconic cereal milk soft serve.

2. AMPLE HILLS CREAMERY, NEW YORK: Founded by a former sci-fi screenwriter, and named for a line in a Walt Whitman poem, Ample Hills isn’t your average scoop shop. It serves up wonderfully weird, playful flavors, from Ooey Gooey Butter Cake to the irresistible Sweet As Honey, which is studded with pieces of honeycomb. As a bonus, many of its mix-in ingredients are baked in-house.

3. LULU’S NITROGEN ICE CREAM, MIAMI: Given how high the thermostat can climb in Miami, it only makes sense that Lulu’s ice cream is colder than cold. Order your cup or cone and watch as it freezes in front of your eyes with liquid nitrogen, which billows around the room in white nimbuses. Given that Lulu’s is just minutes from the water’s edge, it’s worth trying one of the shop’s tropical flavors, from guava and goat cheese to piña colada.

4. THE ICE CREAM BAR, SAN FRANCISCO: At the opposite end of the frozen treats spectrum from liquid nitrogen is San Francisco’s old-timey Ice Cream Bar. Wander inside, and you might as well have stepped in a time machine back to the 1930s. At this throwback soda fountain, servers wearing jaunty caps and bowties whip up floats and malts, and create picture-perfect hot fudge and banana sundaes.

5. SWEET ROSE CREAMERY, LA: Los Angeles is a city that takes its ice cream seriously. The fact that Sweet Rose Creamery is widely considered one of the best ice cream shops in town, therefore, is testament to the impeccable quality of its scoops. (It doesn’t hurt that it sources ingredients from the Santa Monica Farmer’s Market.) Stop in to try a range of flavors, which change every month, or go big with an ice cream cake—sharing recommended, but not required.

6. QUEEN OF CREAM, ATLANTA: The dairy is sourced from a family-run farm in Georgia, and the ice cream is made entirely from scratch, in small batches, on-site. No wonder Queen of Cream is one of the most popular ice cream shops around town. On the days when Hotlanta more than lives up to its nickname, settle in for a scoop of brown butter pecan ice cream, or nosh on a homemade ice cream sandwich.

7. BIG GAY ICE CREAM, PHILADELPHIA: Born in New York, Big Gay Ice Cream has since expanded to the City of Brotherly Love. The shop is best known for its soft serve, which is especially good when coated in rainbow sprinkles other decadent offerings range from hot fudge sundaes to Nutella milkshakes. Its rainbow ceilings and unicorn-bedecked front window are nearly as festive as its frozen treats.

8. SALT & STRAW, PORTLAND: Salt & Straw frequently collaborates with esteemed local chefs on its ice creams, which means you can expect to encounter some pretty inventive flavors. Think: duck crackling and cherry preserves ice cream, or scoops mixed with ras el hanout and pickled rose petal jam. After something slightly more pedestrian? Don’t worry its chocolate gooey brownie and double-fold vanilla are also killer.

9. JENI’S SPLENDID ICE CREAMS, CHICAGO: Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams was born several decades ago in Ohio, when founder Jeni Britton Bauer decided to take her hobby—casually churning up ice cream for her friends—pro. Today, Jeni’s operates a number of scoop shops, with five in Chicago alone. That means five different opportunities to try flavors like churro, salted honey pie, or brandied banana brûlée.

10. FRANKIE & JO’S, SEATTLE: Frankie and Jo’s makes ice cream that’s so creamy, so decadent, so gosh-dang delicious that you’d be surprised to discover it’s exclusively plant-based. One of the best ice cream shops around, whether you’re a vegan or otherwise, Frankie & Jo’s makes clever use of coconut cream and nut milk when crafting ice cream recipes. Their waffle cones and toppings are all vegan and gluten-free, too.


Celebrate Today with an Ice Cream Social

Happy National Ice Cream Day! Celebrate with a deliciously old-fashioned ice cream social. This playful party is a great opportunity to entertain friends at home without hosting a formal sit-down dinner. Just set out a variety of homemade ice creams, sauces and toppings, and let guests get creative by building their perfect bowls. Our tips and recipes will help you bring the party to life.

Yes, you can use store-bought ice cream, but nothing beats the flavor and texture of the homemade stuff. Start with classic crowd-pleasers vanilla and chocolate , then add a fruit, nut or other flavor in the mix. Customers love our fresh strawberry , coffee and pistachio ice cream recipes. Consider adding a sorbet for a vegan option and frozen yogurt for something lighter, too.

All you need to get started is an ice cream maker, like this entry-level Cuisinart ice cream maker.

If you’re one to serve more offbeat, creative ice cream flavors, then try making ice cream with our Humphry Slocombe starter bases, which include Secret Breakfast (that’d be cornflakes and bourbon!), Vietnamese Coffee and Chocolate Malted Ice Cream .

Sweet baked treats soak up ice cream and make great sundaes. Bake your favorite pie or a fruit crumble to serve with the ice cream. A batch of warm brownies and cookies will be welcome, too—you can even invite guests to make their own ice cream sandwiches !

For toppings, make a variety of sauces to drizzle over the ice cream, such as chocolate , caramel and raspberry . Fresh fruit, toasted nuts and granola are good options for lighter toppings, but you’ll want plenty of decadent crushed cookies, candy bars and chocolate chips, too. Pick a range of your favorite toppings to display we’re partial to our dessert sprinkle mix , chocolate ice cream sprinkles and bourbon almond brittle .

With the right tools, you can accommodate a host of cravings. You’ll need an ice cream maker , of course, but you can also use a shake maker or a trusty blender to make all kinds of frosty milk shakes and malted favorites.

Don’t forget about that other soda fountain favorite, the root beer float. Have some root beer and sodas on hand for pouring over ice cream, along with plenty of whipped cream.

Waffle cones make everyone feel like a kid again. Prepared ones make it easy to serve a crowd, but for smaller groups, make your own —the flavor will be infinitely better. ( Here’s a recipe. ) For even more ice cream inspiration, check out our All About Ice Cream guide.

The beauty of this party is that almost everything can be made up to a week ahead, including the ice creams and the sauces. (You can also bake pies, brownies and cookies up to two days in advance.) The day of the get-together, all you have to do is work on the presentation.

Speaking of presentation, skip paper cups in favor of pretty glass ice cream bowls . They’re ideal for serving the ice cream and displaying the toppings.

The Chef’n Sweet Spot allows you to create instant treats like ice cream in just two minutes. At parties, everyone can prepare their own frozen treat and add favorite mix-ins.

To make the party a memorable one, make it interactive! A couple of fun tools can turn the occasion into a make-your-own ice cream extravaganza. Our Chef’n Sweet Spot Ice Cream Maker and Zoku Ice Cream Maker turn a chilled ice cream base into a tasty frozen treat in just minutes, starring whatever mix-ins you like. Kids will love it!

For a charming touch, give guests a homemade party favor on their way out. Just multiply the recipes for the sauces and pour into jars with a handwritten label—they’ll love having something sweet to take home.


EXCLUSIVE: Doug Quint Spills On The South Beach Big Gay Ice Cream Social

A long time ago in New York, Art Smith met Doug Quint and Bryan Petroff of Big Gay Ice Cream for the first time (which we may have facilitated). Months later, the three are teaming up in South Beach to throw an enormous, decadent (yet family friendly!), and totally free ice cream party with a purpose: bringing attention to the burgeoning issue of gay marriage rights in Florida.

Held this Saturday at the James Hotel in Miami, close to the official South Beach Food and Wine Festival itself (it’s unaffiliated), the Big Gay Ice Cream Social (of course) will feature tropical ice cream sundaes from Miami’s Real Sorbet (and “adult” soda floats from Big Gay Ice Cream), as well as food from chef Kris Wessel of Florida Cookery, and mysterious guest food celebrity attendees, which Quint coyly teased in an interview. “I’m not going to be the guy that says that ‘somebody’s going to show up,'” he said. (We know, that’s Art Smith’s job.)

But despite the festive nature of the party — even with the maybe-appearance of Quint in a speedo — there’s a reason that Smith, a prominent gay rights activist, and Big Gay Ice Cream, self-evident proponents of gay marriage, have taken this party to Florida: “Florida is the next battleground state for marriage equality,” Quint explained in an email, “so Art is doing all he can to raise awareness of that and drum up support.”

Currently, Florida’s constitution bans gay marriage outright, thanks to a 2008 amendment enacted through a ballot initiative. But five years later, the margin between gay marriage supporters and opposers is thinner than ever: a recent poll from Quinnipiac University found voters’ opinions “nearly evenly divided,” with 43 percent in favor and 45 percent opposing. (Younger voters overwhelmingly support gay marriage, with 66 percent of voters under 29 in favor.) And with the next election taking place in 2014, Quint believes that the sooner they raise awareness of the issue, “the higher the majority will be.”

“It’s time for people to get talking in Florida,” Quint said, noting that they had more than a year before gay rights could be put up for referendum. “There isn’t a ballot measure on this issue yet…but the more we get people talking about this issue this far in advance, the more people come over to what we believe is the correct line of thinking.”


Primary Sidebar

About

Hi, I’m Nicole! Welcome to NOBREAD- a guide to the best gluten-free dishes around the world, delicious recipes, and my favorite wellness tips and tricks! This blog that I started out of personal convenience quickly turned into my passion, and this passion has become my full-time career. Crazy! I’m excited for you to experience all aspects of the gluten-free life!


Big Gay Ice Cream Social Dave Arnold's Searzall Sales

SOUTH BEACH— During this week's South Beach Wine & Food Festival, chef Art Smith will team with the Big Gay Ice Cream duo to host an ice cream social benefiting marriage equality efforts in Florida. The Big Gay Ice Cream Social will set up at Miami Beach's James Royal Palm Hotel on Saturday, February 22. In addition to ice cream, expect treats from the likes of Jamie De Rosa, Todd Erickson, and of course, Art Smith. More information here. [EaterWire]

NEW YORK CITY— After an incredibly successful Kickstarter campaign, cocktail wizard Dave Arnold's hand-held broiler the Searzall has extended its buying period on Shopstarter, with pre-orders available now for a June 2014 release. [EaterWire]

DENVER— Porky traveling circus Cochon 555 has announced the five competing chefs for its upcoming Denver event, which is set for March 9. Chefs Jennifer Jasinski, Paul Reilly, Bill Greenwood, Justin Brunson, and Steve Redzikowski will all battle it out for the Princ(ess) of Porc title tickets are $125 and available here. [Eater Denver]


Ian Carandang Founder Sebastian’s Artisan Ice Cream

Carandang himself is proudly chubby, gregarious, opinionated, and a passionate advocate for his nation’s culinary traditions and offerings.

N ew York’s world-famous Big Gay Ice Cream may need to hand over their title to the Philippines’ Ian Carandang. The openly gay, Manila- based sorbetero is founder of Sebastian’s Artisan Ice Cream (www.facebook.com/sebastians.ice.cream), which not only pushes the envelope with adventurous “big” flavors, but also unabashedly gay, frosty items like rainbow and bear-pride flag colored ice pops, and a wonderfully cute, decadent chocolate-enrobed Chubby Bar line featuring some of Manila’s cutest bears and cubs in its cheeky ad campaign.

“It was hugely successful,” Carandang admits, “and they sold quickly despite being a [higher-priced] item. As for the models, all of whom are my friends, they’re now local ‘bear-lebrities.’ I asked them to make an appearance at this year’s Pride to sell ice cream at our stall, and they were absolutely mobbed. I’m told that they still regularly get asked on Growlr if they’re the ones from the ads. The campaign set a new benchmark for product launches, filled with good vibes and positivity, and I’m looking to make that a cornerstone of the Sebastian’s product cycle.”

Carandang himself is proudly chubby, gregarious, opinionated, and a passionate advocate for his nation’s culinary traditions and offerings. To that end, he’s bringing more Philippine flavors, ingredients, and dishes, both savory and sweet, to Sebastian’s delicious product line, which includes 15 scoopable flavors at any given time, colorful 30-layer ice pops (paletas), Chilly Burger ice cream cookie sandwiches, Chubby Bars, and frozen cheesecake bars.

Sebastian’s Chocolate-Covered Chicharrón ice cream incorporates crunchy fried pork rinds, a ubiquitous Filipino snack, in much the way Portland’s Salt & Straw, Brooklyn’s Oddfellows, and other creative USA ice cream makers have integrated bacon. Iconic dessert halo-halo is presented as colorful 30-layer paletas, which take three days to craft. Components include jackfruit, coconut-based jelly nata de coco, sugar palm fruit, glutinous rice pinipig, and beans. Sapin Sapin, a multi-layered, gelatinous confection fashioned from violet-hued Ube yams and coconut, becomes an ice cream delight also made up of several distinct, multi-hued flavors. Chocolate rice pudding dish Champorado is deliciously rendered as ice cream, although an optional candied dilis (anchovies) topping takes it to the next über-local, funky level.

“I am definitely looking more inward for local flavors,” Carandang shares, “as my next crop of ice creams are all based on local desserts and confections.”

How about balut, the infamous Filipino street and bar snack (a duck egg with partially formed embryo) that sends most Western visitors and even some locals into gagging mode?

“Never say never,” Carandang grins in response. “Once I crossed the Rubicon with Green Mango Sorbet and bagoong, a fermented shrimp paste, nothing is off limits at this point. What I wouldn’t do, though, is make a flavor just for shock value. Even though some flavors, like Bitter Melon Sorbet, called Unresolved Issues and released every Valentine’s Day for ironic purposes, grab a lot of media coverage for their ‘WTF!?’ factor, I approach every flavor, whether mundane or radically experimental, by making it as delicious as possible and faithful to the source inspiration.”

Iget to sample many of the above flavors and products at Sebastian’s location on the fourth floor of The Podium shopping center, located in Mandaluyong, one of 16 cities that make up Metro Manila. I first met Carandang, however, at the Shangri-La Makati, conveniently posited in one of the traffic-plagued metropolis’ most boutique-y, walkable districts, with upscale shopping developments, craft coffee shops, greenery, and a proliferation of excellent new dining spots and hipster denizens.

Over the next few days, Carandang thoroughly schools me on Filipino cuisine, its history, its most exciting new chefs, and, of course, Sebastian’s and his career as the country’s sole openly gay sorbetero.

Sebastian’s Matinong Boyfriend Ice Cream

“In terms of the culinary scene, quite a few openly gay Filipino chefs have made their mark,” he notes. “The late Ed Quimson was very much a mentor to a whole generation of chefs [and I use his bagoong recipe in my Green Mango sorbet]. Chef Miko Aspiras is one of the most widely acclaimed pastry chefs in the country, and local press has done features about him and his fiancé, JV San Juan, which is amazing. LGBT rights in the Philippines is a work in progress, and same-sex marriage is still considered a pipe dream at this point even by the staunchest supporters. Not surprising, considering we are the last country on the planet without divorce. But in the culinary scene at least, being gay is definitely not an issue.”

Born in Makati City and raised in Metro Manila, Carandang a first found inspiration for his career thanks to Ben & Jerry’s. As a youth during the early 2000s, he was only able to access the Vermont-based pair’s 1987 recipe book, as the product itself wasn’t available locally. However, thanks to a stroke of luck and frozen stock at a duty-free shop, he finally sampled chunky monkey, Wavy Gravy, cookie dough, and other flavors. “It was like an atomic bomb went off in my head,” he recalls, “and my perspective on ice cream was blown to smithereens. For someone who up until that point had only been familiar with vanilla, Rocky Road, strawberry and ube, I resolved there and then to make my own Ben & Jerry–style ice cream for myself. And that’s where the seeds of Sebastian’s were planted.”

Come 2006, after teaming up with college pals and a year of exclusively marketing to restaurants, Sebastian’s opened a first retail “scooping station” stall in an Alabang mall. Today there are three locations in Metro Manila, and pop-up booths at events including Manila’s Gay Pride.

It was one such pride showing that ultimately led to Carandang’s public coming out. “For one day we renamed all of our flavors with drag names,” he recalls. “Cookie Dough became ‘Cookie Dontcha Wish Your Boyfriend Was Hot Like Me,’ and Salted butter caramel became ‘Senyorita Saltina Buteraka Carmela.’ It had a great reception, but there was one comment on Facebook that said in Tagalog, ‘a faggot must have done this.’ I deleted it and blocked the user, and then I made this short, heartfelt post coming out publicly, talking about who I was and that bigotry and intolerance of this kind would have no place on our wall. It was an emotionally driven decision, admittedly not the most professional move, but Sebastian’s itself is very personal to me. Thankfully, there was no blowback as far as I could tell and the post itself had nothing but positive support and encouragement. “

Sebastian’s Sapin Sapin Ice Cream

Besides his rainbow-colored gay pride ice bar, Carandang also crafts a bear-pride flag bar with scrump- tious and creamy layers of Nutella, peanut butter, caramel, coffee, black sesame, and bittersweet chocolate sorbets. 2016 saw the introduction of the bear-y yummy and artery-clogging Chubby Bars (Chocolate Chip Fudge, with chocolate chip cookie, vanilla ice cream, ganache, and a milk chocolate coating). It’s no surprise that Carandang is a prominent member of the Manila bear community, and at one dinner he introduces me to a friend, Kookie, who heads up a cute ursine T-shirt line called Monster Bear Wear Manila (www.facebook.com/monster-bear-wear-manila-617012085042395).

“Although not as active as in other countries, bear communities do exist here,” Carandang says. “The largest one would be BiggerManila, which arranges annual events MyChuva in February and ChubiBoo in October, where the whole bear community gets together in one place to meet people they usually only see online. There’s currently no official bear bar in Manila, but the closest thing would be Sunstar karaoke bar in Cubao, also sometimes referred to by it’s original name, Satellite. It’s a seedy, smoky joint where blue-collar gays hang out to drink, sing, and mingle late into the night. You get to see gruff laborer types belting out Celine Dion songs, which is admittedly an experience.”

On a more generalized level, Carandang characterizes the Manila gay scene as one where LGBTs are acknowledged and recognized. Sassy young gay boys slinging Vuitton bags and rocking skintight jeans are a common sight around Makati’s Greenbelt shopping development, yet bigots can still fire off homophonic comments publicly with little repercussion.

“There’s this unspoken attitude of, ‘you can get this amount of rights, but this is as far as it goes.’ The Roman Catholic Church still has a stranglehold over the majority of the population, and gay Catholics struggle to reconcile being part of an institution that openly discriminates against them. It’s more of tolerance than genuine equality. That being said, if you want to meet some gay locals, all you have to do is turn on your Growlr or Grindr in Manila and watch the greetings pile up. Just be wary of hustlers and scam artists!”

One day, Carandang brings me to one of his favorite places to cool off, the Ace Water Spa, an indoor water-park-meets-health-spa beloved by Filipinos of all ages. Some other favorite local spots he introduces me to include Little Tokyo and Chinatown, the five-floor Fully Booked bookstore in upscale, leafy BGC district, and weekend markets Salcedo (Saturdays) and Legazpi Park (Sundays).

“I love Manila in that first and foremost it was where I was born and the place I grew up in,” he tells me. “It’s taken care of me and even though it can make itself hard to love at times, I want to give back to it. This city, much like the country itself, has been through a lot. Four hundred years of colonization by the Spanish, 40 under the Americans, two under the Japanese. Celebrated as the Pearl of Asia at the beginning of the 20th century, to being pitied as the Sick Man of the region in the 1980s. It is very imperfect. But at the same time, it’s a city with soul. Manila has a fire borne from adversity, a thirst for recognition, and a hunger for greatness. It’s dysfunctional in exactly the way a place needs to be to become a hotbed for amazing work in music, food, theater, art, and life. Yet most of all, I love that Manila in the last five years has truly become this exciting foodie hub. A stronger economy with more purchasing power, combined with a globally aware populace who know about the trends going on internationally and are hungry to try them out, have resulted in a vibrant restaurant scene.”

Regarding his favorite places to travel, for food or otherwise, Carandang numerates beauteous Philippine island Palawan, Japan’s Tokyo, Kyoto, Osaka, and Hokkaido, the latter for its world-class soft serve and dairy product (a hotly desired premium within Asia), the USA’s San Francisco (an artisanal ice cream mecca thanks to innovators Bi-Rite Creamery and Humphry Slocombe), NYC, and Dallas, Texas.

In fact, a few days after we parted ways, Carandang headed to Dallas for the annual Texas Bear Round-Up, aka TBRU.

“I’d like to someday attend other bear events,” he enthused. “Provincetown Bear Week, Sonoma California’s Lazy Bear Weekend, Orlando’s Tidal Wave, and Chicago’s Bear Pride. Attending my first ever bear event really changed my life, showing me a world of inclusivity, body positivity, and ultimately led to meeting my amazing boyfriend, Kameron. Of course, I need to go to Vermont and visit the Ben & Jerry’s plant there. It’s basically my pilgrimage to mecca to pay homage to my ice cream sensei.”


Art Smith Hosts Second Annual Big Gay Ice Cream Social at SoBe WFF

Last year, we brought tell of the Art Smith-hosted Big Gay Ice Cream Social at the South Beach Wine and Food Festival, featuring the iconic Big Gay Ice Cream Truck and its founders Doug Quint and Bryan Petroff. The trio collaborated for a free ice cream giveaway at the James Royal Palm Hotel during the WFF to bring attention to Florida’s marriage equality campaign.

“Last year was fantastic. We were very happy with it, especially considering it came together in about ten days! We had lovely ice cream, lots of fun chefs from the festival, and a number of locals came in to enjoy it all. We got nice press for Florida’s push for marriage equality… We couldn’t have been happier. Where else could someone from Miami hobnob with Anne Burrell and a drag queen, eat some ice cream, and do it all for free for a good cause? Yay!”

This year, Art Smith and Lorena Garcia are collaborating on a treat for the event, and Top Chef Masters alum Jenn Louis will contribute a special ice cream topping.


16 Things We Learned at SOBEWFF

Another South Beach Wine & Food Fest has come and gone. And yes, it was hot, humid and awesome. HUGE thanks to Lee Schrager & his team for putting on what I like to think of as spring break for the culinary world…. except in this case, what happened on spring break is not staying&hellip Read More &rarr

Copyright © 2021 Andrew Zimmern . All rights reserved.

This website uses cookies for necessary functions and to enhance your browsing experience.


South Beach Wine & Food Report: The Big Gay Grind

CHOW.com contributor Rebecca Flint Marx is in Miami, chronicling preparations for the massive annual Food Network South Beach Wine & Food Festival, February 23-26. Over the next few days she’ll file dispatches from the celebrity-packed festival’s less glamorous side.

Though the South Beach Wine & Food Festival kicks off Thursday night, chefs—or more specifically, their underlings—have been hard at work since Tuesday morning, slicing ungodly amounts of onions, roasting untold pounds of animal flesh, and all but drowning in vats of salad dressing. There is, in short, a shitload of preparation that goes into feeding 2,000 people a night, which is about how many are supposed to attend The Q, the characteristically excessive barbecue party that kicks off the festival.

Among those who will be slinging their delectable wares are Doug Quint and Bryan Petroff (pictured, from left), the owners of New York’s Big Gay Ice Cream Truck and Shop. They were invited down to make ice cream for 4,000 people over the course of four nights, an undertaking that has required months of planning.

Today’s work mainly concerned making dough for the 1,000 ice cream sandwiches the guys are supposed to serve at Friday’s Burger Bash, as well as various sauces for the cones. All of this is done in the two commercial kitchens deep inside the bowels of the Miami Beach Convention Center, a vast, labyrinthine place with spectacularly ugly wall-to-wall carpeting.

The kitchens are filled almost entirely with culinary students from Florida International University. When we arrived yesterday, the air was heavy with the scent of the approximately 8 million tons of onions they were slicing. Numerous students were also engaged in making vats of dressing for Nadia G., that Cooking Channel host known for irritating people. At this point I should mention that you will not find any Food Network or Cooking Channel “chefs” or personalities actually making any food at South Beach they send their people, or their people’s people, to boss around the students (Bobby Flay’s sous chefs are reportedly real ball-busters).

One notable exception is Marc Forgione, winner of The Next Iron Chef Season 3 and the owner of an eponymous New York restaurant. He arrived in the kitchens today and promptly started making meatballs with some of the students.

Guy Fieri actually swanned through the kitchen today, looking uncannily like a deeply sunburned chicken. Robert Irvine, Restaurant: Impossible host and noted embellisher of the truth, was with him, as was his freakishly muscular torso. The two took some photos, pressed the flesh, and disappeared into the walk-in for a few minutes. All of this distracted the students, who had been toiling all day like indentured elves in Santa’s workshop. After Guy and Robert and their entourage departed, everyone went back to working their fingers to the bone.

Tomorrow morning Doug heads to the beach to get acquainted with the ice cream truck the festival is setting him up with, while Bryan and the students bake off 2,000 cookies. In the meantime, everyone has repaired to their hotels to recuperate, which is pretty easy when you can sit by the pool and drink giant pitchers of adult lemonade and watch European tourists try to slow-roast themselves under what remains of the late-afternoon sun.


Watch the video: Winter party Miami 2018 (December 2021).