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Barack Obama, White House Chef to Speak at Milan Food Summit

Barack Obama, White House Chef to Speak at Milan Food Summit

Former president Barack Obama will speak about food industry innovation

Wikimedia/Pete Souza

Former president Barack Obama will be a keynote speaker at the Global Innovation Food Summit in Milan in May.

Barack Obama’s tenure as president has ended, but that does not necessarily mean he is heading into retirement, and it was announced this week that the former president will be a keynote speaker at the Seeds & Chips Global Innovation Food Summit in Milan next month.

According to The Local Italy, the Global Innovation Food Summit will be held from May 8 to May 11, and it will address innovation, technology, and change in the foodservice industry. Its website says it will be attended by startups, food and tech companies, investors, and policymakers. Barack Obama and his White House chef, Sam Kass, will be speaking about climate change and food--both the way climate change will affect food, and the effects of the foodservice industry on climate change.

Giuseppe Sala, the mayor of Milan, was the one who got to announce Barack Obama’s upcoming appearance and visit to Milan.

Sala says the food summit could well be Barack Obama’s first public appearance since the end of his presidency, and that it was an extreme honor.

“The fact that he has chosen Milan seems extraordinary to me,” Sala said in a statement.

Sala said he would be giving the former president the keys to the city as part of a ceremony during the visit.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.


Barack Obama Tackles Climate Change and Food Security in His Latest Speech

He gave the keynote address at the Seeds and Chips conference.

At former-President Barack Obama’s speech at the third annual Seed and Chips Global Food Innovation Summit in Milan, he focused on how climate change will affect the future of food production.

The goal of the summit is to gather experts that will brainstorm how to face, 𠇌limate change and the issues linked to food supply in an increasingly populated world with progressively scarce resources."

Obama warned that as farm yields decrease in response to unstable, unpredictable seasonal changes, spikes in food prices could increase, eventually leading to political instability.

He praised the Paris Agreement in particular, in which global leaders agreed to make sure that the temperature increases due to global warming stayed well below 2 degrees Celsius – an agreement President Trump is now threatening to back out of.

“In Paris… we helped to lead the world to the first significant global agreement for a low-carbon future," he said.

Sam Kass, former White House chef, joined Obama at the conference. The pair discussed a wide range of food-related topics, including how to integrate new technology into farming practices, and getting more people access to fresh food, which will, in turn, reduce food waste. He also tackled how excess food packaging – like plastic wrappers – contributes to food waste.

𠇏ood is also a &apossocial glue&apos,” he quipped at one point, while discussing how to attract people to healthier food options.

The former president has long been a champion for environmentally sustainable food production practices. He 2009, he founded Feed the Future, a food security initiative that has helped about 18 million children gain access to better nutrition and provided millions more farmers with technologically advanced tools. Meanwhile, Michelle Obama strongly advocated for the Healthy-Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve nutritional standards in school lunches. In early May, the Trump administration rolled back the restrictions her initiative helped put in place.

This was one of Obama’s few public appearances since he’s left office, which surely means that food policy and climate change are of paramount importance to him. And with an administration developing a reputation as hostile toward science it doesn&apost like, Obama&aposs is a welcome voice in the ongoing debate over the effects of climate change.