Traditional recipes

Jicama Salad with Mint Crema

Jicama Salad with Mint Crema

Try this Jicama Salad with Mint Crema recipe from the 'Hartwood' cookbook

When we inspected the plot where we would build the restaurant, we found a twenty-foot-long jicama vine growing wild. The vine was so large it was taking over entire trees.

Jicama is starchy and crisp and completely refreshing. You want the skin to be tight, not wrinkled.

We garnish this salad with Prickly Pear Preserves, but you could use a handful of ripe watermelon cubes instead. And, yes, the mint crema recipe makes double what you’ll need, but we promise you’ll want to make this salad again.

Excerpted from Hartwood by Eric Werner and Mya Henry with Christine Mulke and Oliver Strand (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2015.

Notes

How to Suprême Citrus

This is a classic restaurant technique for trimming off all the peel and bitter pith and separating the sections from the membranes so that all that is left is fruit. The secret is to use a super-sharp knife, which will cut with little effort; if the knife is dull, you’ll need to apply some pressure, and that’s where you get into trouble.

First, slice off the top and bottom of the fruit so that you see two tiny circles of flesh. Then, slice off the skin, pith, and outer membrane, following the curvature of the fruit. Trim off any white patches left after you cut off all the peel.

Now you can either stop here and just cut the fruit into ½-inch slices, or you can follow this standard chef’s technique. Holding the fruit in one hand and the knife in the other, working over a small bowl, slice as close as possible to the membranes that separate the sections: Slice along one, then the other, and flick the loosened section into the bowl. When the entire fruit has been sectioned, squeeze the juice from the remaining membranes with your hand and reserve for another use.

Ingredients

For the salad:

  • 2 jicamas (each about the size of a small grapefruit)
  • 2 oranges, suprêmed (see Note)
  • 1 Cup mint leaves
  • 1 Teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 Cup lime and honey vinaigrette (recipe follows)
  • 3/4 Cups mint crema (recipe follows)
  • 3 Tablespoons prickly pear preserves (recipe follows; optional)
  • 1/2 Cup pepitas (pumpkin seeds), toasted in a dry skillet until lightly browned
  • 1/2 Cup sunflower seeds, toasted in a dry skillet until lightly browned

For the mint crema:

  • 8 pepitas (pumpkin seeds), toasted in a dry skillet until lightly browned
  • 1 Cup mint leaves
  • 1/2 Cup olive oil
  • 1 Tablespoon honey
  • 1/2 Teaspoon fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 Cup water
  • 1/3 Cup sour cream
  • 1 Teaspoon kosher salt, or to taste

For the lime and honey vinaigrette:

  • 1/4 Cup fresh lime juice, or to taste
  • 3/4 Cups olive oil
  • 2 Tablespoons honey, or to taste
  • 1 Teaspoon kosher salt, or to taste

For the prickly pear preserves:

  • 2 prickly pears
  • 1 half-inch piece ginger, peeled and cut into quarter-inch slices
  • 1 Tablespoon white vinegar
  • 1 Tablespoon water
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar
  • 1/4 Teaspoon kosher salt

Servings4

Calories Per Serving1315

Folate equivalent (total)145µg36%

Riboflavin (B2)0.4mg24.5%


Jicama Salad

Elise founded Simply Recipes in 2003 and led the site until 2019. She has an MA in Food Research from Stanford University.

This tuber looks like a seriously overgrown radish and is the root of a vine native to Mexico and Central America.

The flesh is crunchy, mild, and even faintly sweet, and is often served with a little lime juice and chile powder to accompany Mexican dishes.

I first encountered jicama (pronounced HICK-ah-mah) years ago in cafeteria salad bars, and on its own (how they typically serve it in those places), jicama can be a little boring.

With some seasoning and lime juice, however, it comes alive, and is wonderfully refreshing, especially along side tacos and refried beans.

Jicama salads are usually prepared with julienned jicama a little thicker than what I have shown here. Cut them this small (result of the mandoline) and the jicama pieces will bend a bit and the salad will resemble more of a slaw than of chunky pieces of jicama.

The good news is cut this way the salad will be easier to eat. Julienne or cube the jicama into pieces you are most comfortable eating.


Jicama Salad

Elise founded Simply Recipes in 2003 and led the site until 2019. She has an MA in Food Research from Stanford University.

This tuber looks like a seriously overgrown radish and is the root of a vine native to Mexico and Central America.

The flesh is crunchy, mild, and even faintly sweet, and is often served with a little lime juice and chile powder to accompany Mexican dishes.

I first encountered jicama (pronounced HICK-ah-mah) years ago in cafeteria salad bars, and on its own (how they typically serve it in those places), jicama can be a little boring.

With some seasoning and lime juice, however, it comes alive, and is wonderfully refreshing, especially along side tacos and refried beans.

Jicama salads are usually prepared with julienned jicama a little thicker than what I have shown here. Cut them this small (result of the mandoline) and the jicama pieces will bend a bit and the salad will resemble more of a slaw than of chunky pieces of jicama.

The good news is cut this way the salad will be easier to eat. Julienne or cube the jicama into pieces you are most comfortable eating.


Jicama Salad

Elise founded Simply Recipes in 2003 and led the site until 2019. She has an MA in Food Research from Stanford University.

This tuber looks like a seriously overgrown radish and is the root of a vine native to Mexico and Central America.

The flesh is crunchy, mild, and even faintly sweet, and is often served with a little lime juice and chile powder to accompany Mexican dishes.

I first encountered jicama (pronounced HICK-ah-mah) years ago in cafeteria salad bars, and on its own (how they typically serve it in those places), jicama can be a little boring.

With some seasoning and lime juice, however, it comes alive, and is wonderfully refreshing, especially along side tacos and refried beans.

Jicama salads are usually prepared with julienned jicama a little thicker than what I have shown here. Cut them this small (result of the mandoline) and the jicama pieces will bend a bit and the salad will resemble more of a slaw than of chunky pieces of jicama.

The good news is cut this way the salad will be easier to eat. Julienne or cube the jicama into pieces you are most comfortable eating.


Jicama Salad

Elise founded Simply Recipes in 2003 and led the site until 2019. She has an MA in Food Research from Stanford University.

This tuber looks like a seriously overgrown radish and is the root of a vine native to Mexico and Central America.

The flesh is crunchy, mild, and even faintly sweet, and is often served with a little lime juice and chile powder to accompany Mexican dishes.

I first encountered jicama (pronounced HICK-ah-mah) years ago in cafeteria salad bars, and on its own (how they typically serve it in those places), jicama can be a little boring.

With some seasoning and lime juice, however, it comes alive, and is wonderfully refreshing, especially along side tacos and refried beans.

Jicama salads are usually prepared with julienned jicama a little thicker than what I have shown here. Cut them this small (result of the mandoline) and the jicama pieces will bend a bit and the salad will resemble more of a slaw than of chunky pieces of jicama.

The good news is cut this way the salad will be easier to eat. Julienne or cube the jicama into pieces you are most comfortable eating.


Jicama Salad

Elise founded Simply Recipes in 2003 and led the site until 2019. She has an MA in Food Research from Stanford University.

This tuber looks like a seriously overgrown radish and is the root of a vine native to Mexico and Central America.

The flesh is crunchy, mild, and even faintly sweet, and is often served with a little lime juice and chile powder to accompany Mexican dishes.

I first encountered jicama (pronounced HICK-ah-mah) years ago in cafeteria salad bars, and on its own (how they typically serve it in those places), jicama can be a little boring.

With some seasoning and lime juice, however, it comes alive, and is wonderfully refreshing, especially along side tacos and refried beans.

Jicama salads are usually prepared with julienned jicama a little thicker than what I have shown here. Cut them this small (result of the mandoline) and the jicama pieces will bend a bit and the salad will resemble more of a slaw than of chunky pieces of jicama.

The good news is cut this way the salad will be easier to eat. Julienne or cube the jicama into pieces you are most comfortable eating.


Jicama Salad

Elise founded Simply Recipes in 2003 and led the site until 2019. She has an MA in Food Research from Stanford University.

This tuber looks like a seriously overgrown radish and is the root of a vine native to Mexico and Central America.

The flesh is crunchy, mild, and even faintly sweet, and is often served with a little lime juice and chile powder to accompany Mexican dishes.

I first encountered jicama (pronounced HICK-ah-mah) years ago in cafeteria salad bars, and on its own (how they typically serve it in those places), jicama can be a little boring.

With some seasoning and lime juice, however, it comes alive, and is wonderfully refreshing, especially along side tacos and refried beans.

Jicama salads are usually prepared with julienned jicama a little thicker than what I have shown here. Cut them this small (result of the mandoline) and the jicama pieces will bend a bit and the salad will resemble more of a slaw than of chunky pieces of jicama.

The good news is cut this way the salad will be easier to eat. Julienne or cube the jicama into pieces you are most comfortable eating.


Jicama Salad

Elise founded Simply Recipes in 2003 and led the site until 2019. She has an MA in Food Research from Stanford University.

This tuber looks like a seriously overgrown radish and is the root of a vine native to Mexico and Central America.

The flesh is crunchy, mild, and even faintly sweet, and is often served with a little lime juice and chile powder to accompany Mexican dishes.

I first encountered jicama (pronounced HICK-ah-mah) years ago in cafeteria salad bars, and on its own (how they typically serve it in those places), jicama can be a little boring.

With some seasoning and lime juice, however, it comes alive, and is wonderfully refreshing, especially along side tacos and refried beans.

Jicama salads are usually prepared with julienned jicama a little thicker than what I have shown here. Cut them this small (result of the mandoline) and the jicama pieces will bend a bit and the salad will resemble more of a slaw than of chunky pieces of jicama.

The good news is cut this way the salad will be easier to eat. Julienne or cube the jicama into pieces you are most comfortable eating.


Jicama Salad

Elise founded Simply Recipes in 2003 and led the site until 2019. She has an MA in Food Research from Stanford University.

This tuber looks like a seriously overgrown radish and is the root of a vine native to Mexico and Central America.

The flesh is crunchy, mild, and even faintly sweet, and is often served with a little lime juice and chile powder to accompany Mexican dishes.

I first encountered jicama (pronounced HICK-ah-mah) years ago in cafeteria salad bars, and on its own (how they typically serve it in those places), jicama can be a little boring.

With some seasoning and lime juice, however, it comes alive, and is wonderfully refreshing, especially along side tacos and refried beans.

Jicama salads are usually prepared with julienned jicama a little thicker than what I have shown here. Cut them this small (result of the mandoline) and the jicama pieces will bend a bit and the salad will resemble more of a slaw than of chunky pieces of jicama.

The good news is cut this way the salad will be easier to eat. Julienne or cube the jicama into pieces you are most comfortable eating.


Jicama Salad

Elise founded Simply Recipes in 2003 and led the site until 2019. She has an MA in Food Research from Stanford University.

This tuber looks like a seriously overgrown radish and is the root of a vine native to Mexico and Central America.

The flesh is crunchy, mild, and even faintly sweet, and is often served with a little lime juice and chile powder to accompany Mexican dishes.

I first encountered jicama (pronounced HICK-ah-mah) years ago in cafeteria salad bars, and on its own (how they typically serve it in those places), jicama can be a little boring.

With some seasoning and lime juice, however, it comes alive, and is wonderfully refreshing, especially along side tacos and refried beans.

Jicama salads are usually prepared with julienned jicama a little thicker than what I have shown here. Cut them this small (result of the mandoline) and the jicama pieces will bend a bit and the salad will resemble more of a slaw than of chunky pieces of jicama.

The good news is cut this way the salad will be easier to eat. Julienne or cube the jicama into pieces you are most comfortable eating.


Jicama Salad

Elise founded Simply Recipes in 2003 and led the site until 2019. She has an MA in Food Research from Stanford University.

This tuber looks like a seriously overgrown radish and is the root of a vine native to Mexico and Central America.

The flesh is crunchy, mild, and even faintly sweet, and is often served with a little lime juice and chile powder to accompany Mexican dishes.

I first encountered jicama (pronounced HICK-ah-mah) years ago in cafeteria salad bars, and on its own (how they typically serve it in those places), jicama can be a little boring.

With some seasoning and lime juice, however, it comes alive, and is wonderfully refreshing, especially along side tacos and refried beans.

Jicama salads are usually prepared with julienned jicama a little thicker than what I have shown here. Cut them this small (result of the mandoline) and the jicama pieces will bend a bit and the salad will resemble more of a slaw than of chunky pieces of jicama.

The good news is cut this way the salad will be easier to eat. Julienne or cube the jicama into pieces you are most comfortable eating.