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What's the Healthiest Frozen Pizza?

What's the Healthiest Frozen Pizza?

Is there really such a thing as healthy pizza?

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Kashi's frozen pizzas are generally quite healthy.

If you know anything about nutrition, you probably know that pizza isn’t especially good for you. But are there any frozen pizzas that are downright healthy? You might be surprised, but there are.

The first thing you should look at when you’re shopping for frozen pizza is the fat and calorie count, obviously, but there are a couple other things you should pay attention to as well: the serving size (many frozen pizzas contain at least three servings), and the ingredients; try to find a pizza with as few chemicals and possible. If the pizza is topped with vegetables instead of just cheese and pepperoni, that’s also a plus.

If you’re looking for healthy frozen pizza, there are a few brands that you should start with. Kashi’s pizzas are generally healthy (we’re fans of the Mushroom Trio & Spinach pie), as are Newman’s Own (Roasted Vegetable Thin & Crispy is a good one). Amy’s is also getting involved in the pizza game — the brand’s Roasted Vegetable pizza is good, and its Light & Lean line very well might have the healthiest pizzas on the market.


The 5 Best Frozen Pizzas, According to a Nutritionist

Yes, some frozen pizzas are way better for you than others.

Okay, let’s be real: Frozen pizzas aren’t “healthy.” But everything in moderation, right? And while frozen pizzas should probably be seen as more of an indulgence than a dietary staple, there are some options that are better than others. We asked a nutritionist for her frozen pizza recommendations, as well as what you need to keep in mind when you’re passing through the frozen foods isle of your grocery store.

“I would consider frozen pizza to be more of a splurge type of food,” says Cynthia Sass, RD, contributing nutrition editor for Health. 𠇏rozen pizzas are highly processed. Because consumers value taste above nutrition, they’re designed to be as tasty as possible.” However, Sass continues, some brands are better than others, and a quick scan of the nutrition label can help you spot red flags and pick out the healthiest options.

One of the first things to check is the portion size. “Often the portion sizes recommended would not be in line with what most people would realistically eat,” points out Sass. When you read through the nutrition information, make sure you’re looking at the numbers for the whole pizza rather than, for example, a third of the pizza—if you plan on eating all of it.

Another thing to check out is the readability of the ingredient list. “Some pizzas have a really long ingredient list,” notes Sass. This isn’t ideal it would be better if the back of the box looked more like a recipe you could make on your own than a long string of chemical terms. When you see those hard-to-pronounce words, you’re looking at an engineered pizza (rather than one made with more whole foods), which is �initely a red flag,” explains Sass.

Lastly, be mindful of the toppings. This probably goes without saying, but veggie pizzas are preferable over those with processed meats on top, from a nutritional standpoint. A good way to keep an eye on your toppings ratio is to whip up a homemade pizza rather than purchasing a frozen one from the supermarket. This way, you can control exactly what goes into your pizza𠅏rom the dough to the sauce to the toppings. (You can even slim it down by opting for a cheese-less pizza or by sprinkling cheese on only half the pie.)

Ahead, five pizzas that Sass recommends if you find yourself stalling in the frozen pizza section.


The 5 Best Frozen Pizzas, According to a Nutritionist

Yes, some frozen pizzas are way better for you than others.

Okay, let’s be real: Frozen pizzas aren’t “healthy.” But everything in moderation, right? And while frozen pizzas should probably be seen as more of an indulgence than a dietary staple, there are some options that are better than others. We asked a nutritionist for her frozen pizza recommendations, as well as what you need to keep in mind when you’re passing through the frozen foods isle of your grocery store.

“I would consider frozen pizza to be more of a splurge type of food,” says Cynthia Sass, RD, contributing nutrition editor for Health. 𠇏rozen pizzas are highly processed. Because consumers value taste above nutrition, they’re designed to be as tasty as possible.” However, Sass continues, some brands are better than others, and a quick scan of the nutrition label can help you spot red flags and pick out the healthiest options.

One of the first things to check is the portion size. “Often the portion sizes recommended would not be in line with what most people would realistically eat,” points out Sass. When you read through the nutrition information, make sure you’re looking at the numbers for the whole pizza rather than, for example, a third of the pizza—if you plan on eating all of it.

Another thing to check out is the readability of the ingredient list. “Some pizzas have a really long ingredient list,” notes Sass. This isn’t ideal it would be better if the back of the box looked more like a recipe you could make on your own than a long string of chemical terms. When you see those hard-to-pronounce words, you’re looking at an engineered pizza (rather than one made with more whole foods), which is �initely a red flag,” explains Sass.

Lastly, be mindful of the toppings. This probably goes without saying, but veggie pizzas are preferable over those with processed meats on top, from a nutritional standpoint. A good way to keep an eye on your toppings ratio is to whip up a homemade pizza rather than purchasing a frozen one from the supermarket. This way, you can control exactly what goes into your pizza𠅏rom the dough to the sauce to the toppings. (You can even slim it down by opting for a cheese-less pizza or by sprinkling cheese on only half the pie.)

Ahead, five pizzas that Sass recommends if you find yourself stalling in the frozen pizza section.


The 5 Best Frozen Pizzas, According to a Nutritionist

Yes, some frozen pizzas are way better for you than others.

Okay, let’s be real: Frozen pizzas aren’t “healthy.” But everything in moderation, right? And while frozen pizzas should probably be seen as more of an indulgence than a dietary staple, there are some options that are better than others. We asked a nutritionist for her frozen pizza recommendations, as well as what you need to keep in mind when you’re passing through the frozen foods isle of your grocery store.

“I would consider frozen pizza to be more of a splurge type of food,” says Cynthia Sass, RD, contributing nutrition editor for Health. 𠇏rozen pizzas are highly processed. Because consumers value taste above nutrition, they’re designed to be as tasty as possible.” However, Sass continues, some brands are better than others, and a quick scan of the nutrition label can help you spot red flags and pick out the healthiest options.

One of the first things to check is the portion size. “Often the portion sizes recommended would not be in line with what most people would realistically eat,” points out Sass. When you read through the nutrition information, make sure you’re looking at the numbers for the whole pizza rather than, for example, a third of the pizza—if you plan on eating all of it.

Another thing to check out is the readability of the ingredient list. “Some pizzas have a really long ingredient list,” notes Sass. This isn’t ideal it would be better if the back of the box looked more like a recipe you could make on your own than a long string of chemical terms. When you see those hard-to-pronounce words, you’re looking at an engineered pizza (rather than one made with more whole foods), which is �initely a red flag,” explains Sass.

Lastly, be mindful of the toppings. This probably goes without saying, but veggie pizzas are preferable over those with processed meats on top, from a nutritional standpoint. A good way to keep an eye on your toppings ratio is to whip up a homemade pizza rather than purchasing a frozen one from the supermarket. This way, you can control exactly what goes into your pizza𠅏rom the dough to the sauce to the toppings. (You can even slim it down by opting for a cheese-less pizza or by sprinkling cheese on only half the pie.)

Ahead, five pizzas that Sass recommends if you find yourself stalling in the frozen pizza section.


The 5 Best Frozen Pizzas, According to a Nutritionist

Yes, some frozen pizzas are way better for you than others.

Okay, let’s be real: Frozen pizzas aren’t “healthy.” But everything in moderation, right? And while frozen pizzas should probably be seen as more of an indulgence than a dietary staple, there are some options that are better than others. We asked a nutritionist for her frozen pizza recommendations, as well as what you need to keep in mind when you’re passing through the frozen foods isle of your grocery store.

“I would consider frozen pizza to be more of a splurge type of food,” says Cynthia Sass, RD, contributing nutrition editor for Health. 𠇏rozen pizzas are highly processed. Because consumers value taste above nutrition, they’re designed to be as tasty as possible.” However, Sass continues, some brands are better than others, and a quick scan of the nutrition label can help you spot red flags and pick out the healthiest options.

One of the first things to check is the portion size. “Often the portion sizes recommended would not be in line with what most people would realistically eat,” points out Sass. When you read through the nutrition information, make sure you’re looking at the numbers for the whole pizza rather than, for example, a third of the pizza—if you plan on eating all of it.

Another thing to check out is the readability of the ingredient list. “Some pizzas have a really long ingredient list,” notes Sass. This isn’t ideal it would be better if the back of the box looked more like a recipe you could make on your own than a long string of chemical terms. When you see those hard-to-pronounce words, you’re looking at an engineered pizza (rather than one made with more whole foods), which is �initely a red flag,” explains Sass.

Lastly, be mindful of the toppings. This probably goes without saying, but veggie pizzas are preferable over those with processed meats on top, from a nutritional standpoint. A good way to keep an eye on your toppings ratio is to whip up a homemade pizza rather than purchasing a frozen one from the supermarket. This way, you can control exactly what goes into your pizza𠅏rom the dough to the sauce to the toppings. (You can even slim it down by opting for a cheese-less pizza or by sprinkling cheese on only half the pie.)

Ahead, five pizzas that Sass recommends if you find yourself stalling in the frozen pizza section.


The 5 Best Frozen Pizzas, According to a Nutritionist

Yes, some frozen pizzas are way better for you than others.

Okay, let’s be real: Frozen pizzas aren’t “healthy.” But everything in moderation, right? And while frozen pizzas should probably be seen as more of an indulgence than a dietary staple, there are some options that are better than others. We asked a nutritionist for her frozen pizza recommendations, as well as what you need to keep in mind when you’re passing through the frozen foods isle of your grocery store.

“I would consider frozen pizza to be more of a splurge type of food,” says Cynthia Sass, RD, contributing nutrition editor for Health. 𠇏rozen pizzas are highly processed. Because consumers value taste above nutrition, they’re designed to be as tasty as possible.” However, Sass continues, some brands are better than others, and a quick scan of the nutrition label can help you spot red flags and pick out the healthiest options.

One of the first things to check is the portion size. “Often the portion sizes recommended would not be in line with what most people would realistically eat,” points out Sass. When you read through the nutrition information, make sure you’re looking at the numbers for the whole pizza rather than, for example, a third of the pizza—if you plan on eating all of it.

Another thing to check out is the readability of the ingredient list. “Some pizzas have a really long ingredient list,” notes Sass. This isn’t ideal it would be better if the back of the box looked more like a recipe you could make on your own than a long string of chemical terms. When you see those hard-to-pronounce words, you’re looking at an engineered pizza (rather than one made with more whole foods), which is �initely a red flag,” explains Sass.

Lastly, be mindful of the toppings. This probably goes without saying, but veggie pizzas are preferable over those with processed meats on top, from a nutritional standpoint. A good way to keep an eye on your toppings ratio is to whip up a homemade pizza rather than purchasing a frozen one from the supermarket. This way, you can control exactly what goes into your pizza𠅏rom the dough to the sauce to the toppings. (You can even slim it down by opting for a cheese-less pizza or by sprinkling cheese on only half the pie.)

Ahead, five pizzas that Sass recommends if you find yourself stalling in the frozen pizza section.


The 5 Best Frozen Pizzas, According to a Nutritionist

Yes, some frozen pizzas are way better for you than others.

Okay, let’s be real: Frozen pizzas aren’t “healthy.” But everything in moderation, right? And while frozen pizzas should probably be seen as more of an indulgence than a dietary staple, there are some options that are better than others. We asked a nutritionist for her frozen pizza recommendations, as well as what you need to keep in mind when you’re passing through the frozen foods isle of your grocery store.

“I would consider frozen pizza to be more of a splurge type of food,” says Cynthia Sass, RD, contributing nutrition editor for Health. 𠇏rozen pizzas are highly processed. Because consumers value taste above nutrition, they’re designed to be as tasty as possible.” However, Sass continues, some brands are better than others, and a quick scan of the nutrition label can help you spot red flags and pick out the healthiest options.

One of the first things to check is the portion size. “Often the portion sizes recommended would not be in line with what most people would realistically eat,” points out Sass. When you read through the nutrition information, make sure you’re looking at the numbers for the whole pizza rather than, for example, a third of the pizza—if you plan on eating all of it.

Another thing to check out is the readability of the ingredient list. “Some pizzas have a really long ingredient list,” notes Sass. This isn’t ideal it would be better if the back of the box looked more like a recipe you could make on your own than a long string of chemical terms. When you see those hard-to-pronounce words, you’re looking at an engineered pizza (rather than one made with more whole foods), which is �initely a red flag,” explains Sass.

Lastly, be mindful of the toppings. This probably goes without saying, but veggie pizzas are preferable over those with processed meats on top, from a nutritional standpoint. A good way to keep an eye on your toppings ratio is to whip up a homemade pizza rather than purchasing a frozen one from the supermarket. This way, you can control exactly what goes into your pizza𠅏rom the dough to the sauce to the toppings. (You can even slim it down by opting for a cheese-less pizza or by sprinkling cheese on only half the pie.)

Ahead, five pizzas that Sass recommends if you find yourself stalling in the frozen pizza section.


The 5 Best Frozen Pizzas, According to a Nutritionist

Yes, some frozen pizzas are way better for you than others.

Okay, let’s be real: Frozen pizzas aren’t “healthy.” But everything in moderation, right? And while frozen pizzas should probably be seen as more of an indulgence than a dietary staple, there are some options that are better than others. We asked a nutritionist for her frozen pizza recommendations, as well as what you need to keep in mind when you’re passing through the frozen foods isle of your grocery store.

“I would consider frozen pizza to be more of a splurge type of food,” says Cynthia Sass, RD, contributing nutrition editor for Health. 𠇏rozen pizzas are highly processed. Because consumers value taste above nutrition, they’re designed to be as tasty as possible.” However, Sass continues, some brands are better than others, and a quick scan of the nutrition label can help you spot red flags and pick out the healthiest options.

One of the first things to check is the portion size. “Often the portion sizes recommended would not be in line with what most people would realistically eat,” points out Sass. When you read through the nutrition information, make sure you’re looking at the numbers for the whole pizza rather than, for example, a third of the pizza—if you plan on eating all of it.

Another thing to check out is the readability of the ingredient list. “Some pizzas have a really long ingredient list,” notes Sass. This isn’t ideal it would be better if the back of the box looked more like a recipe you could make on your own than a long string of chemical terms. When you see those hard-to-pronounce words, you’re looking at an engineered pizza (rather than one made with more whole foods), which is �initely a red flag,” explains Sass.

Lastly, be mindful of the toppings. This probably goes without saying, but veggie pizzas are preferable over those with processed meats on top, from a nutritional standpoint. A good way to keep an eye on your toppings ratio is to whip up a homemade pizza rather than purchasing a frozen one from the supermarket. This way, you can control exactly what goes into your pizza𠅏rom the dough to the sauce to the toppings. (You can even slim it down by opting for a cheese-less pizza or by sprinkling cheese on only half the pie.)

Ahead, five pizzas that Sass recommends if you find yourself stalling in the frozen pizza section.


The 5 Best Frozen Pizzas, According to a Nutritionist

Yes, some frozen pizzas are way better for you than others.

Okay, let’s be real: Frozen pizzas aren’t “healthy.” But everything in moderation, right? And while frozen pizzas should probably be seen as more of an indulgence than a dietary staple, there are some options that are better than others. We asked a nutritionist for her frozen pizza recommendations, as well as what you need to keep in mind when you’re passing through the frozen foods isle of your grocery store.

“I would consider frozen pizza to be more of a splurge type of food,” says Cynthia Sass, RD, contributing nutrition editor for Health. 𠇏rozen pizzas are highly processed. Because consumers value taste above nutrition, they’re designed to be as tasty as possible.” However, Sass continues, some brands are better than others, and a quick scan of the nutrition label can help you spot red flags and pick out the healthiest options.

One of the first things to check is the portion size. “Often the portion sizes recommended would not be in line with what most people would realistically eat,” points out Sass. When you read through the nutrition information, make sure you’re looking at the numbers for the whole pizza rather than, for example, a third of the pizza—if you plan on eating all of it.

Another thing to check out is the readability of the ingredient list. “Some pizzas have a really long ingredient list,” notes Sass. This isn’t ideal it would be better if the back of the box looked more like a recipe you could make on your own than a long string of chemical terms. When you see those hard-to-pronounce words, you’re looking at an engineered pizza (rather than one made with more whole foods), which is �initely a red flag,” explains Sass.

Lastly, be mindful of the toppings. This probably goes without saying, but veggie pizzas are preferable over those with processed meats on top, from a nutritional standpoint. A good way to keep an eye on your toppings ratio is to whip up a homemade pizza rather than purchasing a frozen one from the supermarket. This way, you can control exactly what goes into your pizza𠅏rom the dough to the sauce to the toppings. (You can even slim it down by opting for a cheese-less pizza or by sprinkling cheese on only half the pie.)

Ahead, five pizzas that Sass recommends if you find yourself stalling in the frozen pizza section.


The 5 Best Frozen Pizzas, According to a Nutritionist

Yes, some frozen pizzas are way better for you than others.

Okay, let’s be real: Frozen pizzas aren’t “healthy.” But everything in moderation, right? And while frozen pizzas should probably be seen as more of an indulgence than a dietary staple, there are some options that are better than others. We asked a nutritionist for her frozen pizza recommendations, as well as what you need to keep in mind when you’re passing through the frozen foods isle of your grocery store.

“I would consider frozen pizza to be more of a splurge type of food,” says Cynthia Sass, RD, contributing nutrition editor for Health. 𠇏rozen pizzas are highly processed. Because consumers value taste above nutrition, they’re designed to be as tasty as possible.” However, Sass continues, some brands are better than others, and a quick scan of the nutrition label can help you spot red flags and pick out the healthiest options.

One of the first things to check is the portion size. “Often the portion sizes recommended would not be in line with what most people would realistically eat,” points out Sass. When you read through the nutrition information, make sure you’re looking at the numbers for the whole pizza rather than, for example, a third of the pizza—if you plan on eating all of it.

Another thing to check out is the readability of the ingredient list. “Some pizzas have a really long ingredient list,” notes Sass. This isn’t ideal it would be better if the back of the box looked more like a recipe you could make on your own than a long string of chemical terms. When you see those hard-to-pronounce words, you’re looking at an engineered pizza (rather than one made with more whole foods), which is �initely a red flag,” explains Sass.

Lastly, be mindful of the toppings. This probably goes without saying, but veggie pizzas are preferable over those with processed meats on top, from a nutritional standpoint. A good way to keep an eye on your toppings ratio is to whip up a homemade pizza rather than purchasing a frozen one from the supermarket. This way, you can control exactly what goes into your pizza𠅏rom the dough to the sauce to the toppings. (You can even slim it down by opting for a cheese-less pizza or by sprinkling cheese on only half the pie.)

Ahead, five pizzas that Sass recommends if you find yourself stalling in the frozen pizza section.


The 5 Best Frozen Pizzas, According to a Nutritionist

Yes, some frozen pizzas are way better for you than others.

Okay, let’s be real: Frozen pizzas aren’t “healthy.” But everything in moderation, right? And while frozen pizzas should probably be seen as more of an indulgence than a dietary staple, there are some options that are better than others. We asked a nutritionist for her frozen pizza recommendations, as well as what you need to keep in mind when you’re passing through the frozen foods isle of your grocery store.

“I would consider frozen pizza to be more of a splurge type of food,” says Cynthia Sass, RD, contributing nutrition editor for Health. 𠇏rozen pizzas are highly processed. Because consumers value taste above nutrition, they’re designed to be as tasty as possible.” However, Sass continues, some brands are better than others, and a quick scan of the nutrition label can help you spot red flags and pick out the healthiest options.

One of the first things to check is the portion size. “Often the portion sizes recommended would not be in line with what most people would realistically eat,” points out Sass. When you read through the nutrition information, make sure you’re looking at the numbers for the whole pizza rather than, for example, a third of the pizza—if you plan on eating all of it.

Another thing to check out is the readability of the ingredient list. “Some pizzas have a really long ingredient list,” notes Sass. This isn’t ideal it would be better if the back of the box looked more like a recipe you could make on your own than a long string of chemical terms. When you see those hard-to-pronounce words, you’re looking at an engineered pizza (rather than one made with more whole foods), which is �initely a red flag,” explains Sass.

Lastly, be mindful of the toppings. This probably goes without saying, but veggie pizzas are preferable over those with processed meats on top, from a nutritional standpoint. A good way to keep an eye on your toppings ratio is to whip up a homemade pizza rather than purchasing a frozen one from the supermarket. This way, you can control exactly what goes into your pizza𠅏rom the dough to the sauce to the toppings. (You can even slim it down by opting for a cheese-less pizza or by sprinkling cheese on only half the pie.)

Ahead, five pizzas that Sass recommends if you find yourself stalling in the frozen pizza section.