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When Is It OK to Bring a Plus One to a Party?

When Is It OK to Bring a Plus One to a Party?

If it's just your name on the invitation, is it OK to bring someone along with you?

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Every week, our resident experts Mindy Lockard and Coryanne Ettiene answer etiquette questions from modern day hosts, offering advice from both traditional and contemporary perspectives.

Have a question you want answered? Send us an email with your dilemma, and then check back every week for new tips and advice.

This week’s question:

I've been invited to a holiday party. Can I bring a guest?

Coryanne: Oftentimes, a formal dinner party invitation will clearly state if a plus one is permitted. If not, presume that the invitation is for you and you only. However, cocktail parties tend to be more relaxed affairs and often the rule of "the more the merrier" applies. When replying to an invitation to a cocktail party, there is no harm in asking if you can bring a date or a plus one. And when your request has been granted, be sure to show your appreciation with a fabulous hostess gift.

Mindy: The envelope is what unlocks the mystery of who is invited. Not what's on the inside of the envelope, but the names written on the outside. With technology, sites like Evite allow you to add how many people will be attending. But chances are the host/hostess won’t appreciate it when you add that you're bringing your five best friends (not that you would). When it's not a formal mailed invite, it's OK to give the host or hostess a call and ask, "I'm calling to confirm who was included on the invite." Sometimes it's an invite for one and sometimes if your host is especially gracious and has room, they will open it up for a plus one.

About Our Experts: Mindy Lockard is The Gracious Girl and offers traditional etiquette advice with a modern, gracious twist. Coryanne Ettiene believes entertaining at home should be an everyday affair; she shares contemporary advice for modern living at Housewife Bliss.


What To Do If You Get A Plus-One Invitation To A Wedding & You're Single AF

A wedding is one of a few traditions left in 2018 whose success is contingent on truly excellent behavior by all involved. Great wedding etiquette on the part of a host means organizing transportation, providing food, and courteously thanking all of the people who took time out of their lives to celebrate you finding your special person. Great wedding etiquette as a guest involves R.S.V.P.-ing in a timely manner, not throwing shade on the venue, and showing up with an appropriate guest, if you were offered the chance to bring one. If you've been offered a plus-one but you're single, that last consideration can be confusing.

As a 29-year-old woman who has been invited to her fair share of weddings with and without plus-ones, here is the most important rule of thumb when it comes to "do I ride solo or not?" Treat your plus-one like you'd treat a bottle of hot sauce — "use sparingly." Receiving a plus-one to a wedding is traditionally reserved for those with spouses, those who are engaged, or those in serious relationships. There are no rules about returning plus-one favors, or even giving them to those in your bridal party with serious relationships (though I personally feel that's the right thing to do, especially when you're asking people to spend a pretty penny).

Plus-ones are costly. If you're single, and you're still getting a plus-one to a wedding, the bride or groom must think that you're pretty special, so kudos to you! However, back to our rule of thumb: always use your plus one sparingly. Just because you are offered a date does not mean you need to bring one, especially if your only option is someone random from a dating app. If you’re single and wondering whether you should use your plus-one or not here are a few considerations to make before deciding what to do.


What To Do If You Get A Plus-One Invitation To A Wedding & You're Single AF

A wedding is one of a few traditions left in 2018 whose success is contingent on truly excellent behavior by all involved. Great wedding etiquette on the part of a host means organizing transportation, providing food, and courteously thanking all of the people who took time out of their lives to celebrate you finding your special person. Great wedding etiquette as a guest involves R.S.V.P.-ing in a timely manner, not throwing shade on the venue, and showing up with an appropriate guest, if you were offered the chance to bring one. If you've been offered a plus-one but you're single, that last consideration can be confusing.

As a 29-year-old woman who has been invited to her fair share of weddings with and without plus-ones, here is the most important rule of thumb when it comes to "do I ride solo or not?" Treat your plus-one like you'd treat a bottle of hot sauce — "use sparingly." Receiving a plus-one to a wedding is traditionally reserved for those with spouses, those who are engaged, or those in serious relationships. There are no rules about returning plus-one favors, or even giving them to those in your bridal party with serious relationships (though I personally feel that's the right thing to do, especially when you're asking people to spend a pretty penny).

Plus-ones are costly. If you're single, and you're still getting a plus-one to a wedding, the bride or groom must think that you're pretty special, so kudos to you! However, back to our rule of thumb: always use your plus one sparingly. Just because you are offered a date does not mean you need to bring one, especially if your only option is someone random from a dating app. If you’re single and wondering whether you should use your plus-one or not here are a few considerations to make before deciding what to do.


What To Do If You Get A Plus-One Invitation To A Wedding & You're Single AF

A wedding is one of a few traditions left in 2018 whose success is contingent on truly excellent behavior by all involved. Great wedding etiquette on the part of a host means organizing transportation, providing food, and courteously thanking all of the people who took time out of their lives to celebrate you finding your special person. Great wedding etiquette as a guest involves R.S.V.P.-ing in a timely manner, not throwing shade on the venue, and showing up with an appropriate guest, if you were offered the chance to bring one. If you've been offered a plus-one but you're single, that last consideration can be confusing.

As a 29-year-old woman who has been invited to her fair share of weddings with and without plus-ones, here is the most important rule of thumb when it comes to "do I ride solo or not?" Treat your plus-one like you'd treat a bottle of hot sauce — "use sparingly." Receiving a plus-one to a wedding is traditionally reserved for those with spouses, those who are engaged, or those in serious relationships. There are no rules about returning plus-one favors, or even giving them to those in your bridal party with serious relationships (though I personally feel that's the right thing to do, especially when you're asking people to spend a pretty penny).

Plus-ones are costly. If you're single, and you're still getting a plus-one to a wedding, the bride or groom must think that you're pretty special, so kudos to you! However, back to our rule of thumb: always use your plus one sparingly. Just because you are offered a date does not mean you need to bring one, especially if your only option is someone random from a dating app. If you’re single and wondering whether you should use your plus-one or not here are a few considerations to make before deciding what to do.


What To Do If You Get A Plus-One Invitation To A Wedding & You're Single AF

A wedding is one of a few traditions left in 2018 whose success is contingent on truly excellent behavior by all involved. Great wedding etiquette on the part of a host means organizing transportation, providing food, and courteously thanking all of the people who took time out of their lives to celebrate you finding your special person. Great wedding etiquette as a guest involves R.S.V.P.-ing in a timely manner, not throwing shade on the venue, and showing up with an appropriate guest, if you were offered the chance to bring one. If you've been offered a plus-one but you're single, that last consideration can be confusing.

As a 29-year-old woman who has been invited to her fair share of weddings with and without plus-ones, here is the most important rule of thumb when it comes to "do I ride solo or not?" Treat your plus-one like you'd treat a bottle of hot sauce — "use sparingly." Receiving a plus-one to a wedding is traditionally reserved for those with spouses, those who are engaged, or those in serious relationships. There are no rules about returning plus-one favors, or even giving them to those in your bridal party with serious relationships (though I personally feel that's the right thing to do, especially when you're asking people to spend a pretty penny).

Plus-ones are costly. If you're single, and you're still getting a plus-one to a wedding, the bride or groom must think that you're pretty special, so kudos to you! However, back to our rule of thumb: always use your plus one sparingly. Just because you are offered a date does not mean you need to bring one, especially if your only option is someone random from a dating app. If you’re single and wondering whether you should use your plus-one or not here are a few considerations to make before deciding what to do.


What To Do If You Get A Plus-One Invitation To A Wedding & You're Single AF

A wedding is one of a few traditions left in 2018 whose success is contingent on truly excellent behavior by all involved. Great wedding etiquette on the part of a host means organizing transportation, providing food, and courteously thanking all of the people who took time out of their lives to celebrate you finding your special person. Great wedding etiquette as a guest involves R.S.V.P.-ing in a timely manner, not throwing shade on the venue, and showing up with an appropriate guest, if you were offered the chance to bring one. If you've been offered a plus-one but you're single, that last consideration can be confusing.

As a 29-year-old woman who has been invited to her fair share of weddings with and without plus-ones, here is the most important rule of thumb when it comes to "do I ride solo or not?" Treat your plus-one like you'd treat a bottle of hot sauce — "use sparingly." Receiving a plus-one to a wedding is traditionally reserved for those with spouses, those who are engaged, or those in serious relationships. There are no rules about returning plus-one favors, or even giving them to those in your bridal party with serious relationships (though I personally feel that's the right thing to do, especially when you're asking people to spend a pretty penny).

Plus-ones are costly. If you're single, and you're still getting a plus-one to a wedding, the bride or groom must think that you're pretty special, so kudos to you! However, back to our rule of thumb: always use your plus one sparingly. Just because you are offered a date does not mean you need to bring one, especially if your only option is someone random from a dating app. If you’re single and wondering whether you should use your plus-one or not here are a few considerations to make before deciding what to do.


What To Do If You Get A Plus-One Invitation To A Wedding & You're Single AF

A wedding is one of a few traditions left in 2018 whose success is contingent on truly excellent behavior by all involved. Great wedding etiquette on the part of a host means organizing transportation, providing food, and courteously thanking all of the people who took time out of their lives to celebrate you finding your special person. Great wedding etiquette as a guest involves R.S.V.P.-ing in a timely manner, not throwing shade on the venue, and showing up with an appropriate guest, if you were offered the chance to bring one. If you've been offered a plus-one but you're single, that last consideration can be confusing.

As a 29-year-old woman who has been invited to her fair share of weddings with and without plus-ones, here is the most important rule of thumb when it comes to "do I ride solo or not?" Treat your plus-one like you'd treat a bottle of hot sauce — "use sparingly." Receiving a plus-one to a wedding is traditionally reserved for those with spouses, those who are engaged, or those in serious relationships. There are no rules about returning plus-one favors, or even giving them to those in your bridal party with serious relationships (though I personally feel that's the right thing to do, especially when you're asking people to spend a pretty penny).

Plus-ones are costly. If you're single, and you're still getting a plus-one to a wedding, the bride or groom must think that you're pretty special, so kudos to you! However, back to our rule of thumb: always use your plus one sparingly. Just because you are offered a date does not mean you need to bring one, especially if your only option is someone random from a dating app. If you’re single and wondering whether you should use your plus-one or not here are a few considerations to make before deciding what to do.


What To Do If You Get A Plus-One Invitation To A Wedding & You're Single AF

A wedding is one of a few traditions left in 2018 whose success is contingent on truly excellent behavior by all involved. Great wedding etiquette on the part of a host means organizing transportation, providing food, and courteously thanking all of the people who took time out of their lives to celebrate you finding your special person. Great wedding etiquette as a guest involves R.S.V.P.-ing in a timely manner, not throwing shade on the venue, and showing up with an appropriate guest, if you were offered the chance to bring one. If you've been offered a plus-one but you're single, that last consideration can be confusing.

As a 29-year-old woman who has been invited to her fair share of weddings with and without plus-ones, here is the most important rule of thumb when it comes to "do I ride solo or not?" Treat your plus-one like you'd treat a bottle of hot sauce — "use sparingly." Receiving a plus-one to a wedding is traditionally reserved for those with spouses, those who are engaged, or those in serious relationships. There are no rules about returning plus-one favors, or even giving them to those in your bridal party with serious relationships (though I personally feel that's the right thing to do, especially when you're asking people to spend a pretty penny).

Plus-ones are costly. If you're single, and you're still getting a plus-one to a wedding, the bride or groom must think that you're pretty special, so kudos to you! However, back to our rule of thumb: always use your plus one sparingly. Just because you are offered a date does not mean you need to bring one, especially if your only option is someone random from a dating app. If you’re single and wondering whether you should use your plus-one or not here are a few considerations to make before deciding what to do.


What To Do If You Get A Plus-One Invitation To A Wedding & You're Single AF

A wedding is one of a few traditions left in 2018 whose success is contingent on truly excellent behavior by all involved. Great wedding etiquette on the part of a host means organizing transportation, providing food, and courteously thanking all of the people who took time out of their lives to celebrate you finding your special person. Great wedding etiquette as a guest involves R.S.V.P.-ing in a timely manner, not throwing shade on the venue, and showing up with an appropriate guest, if you were offered the chance to bring one. If you've been offered a plus-one but you're single, that last consideration can be confusing.

As a 29-year-old woman who has been invited to her fair share of weddings with and without plus-ones, here is the most important rule of thumb when it comes to "do I ride solo or not?" Treat your plus-one like you'd treat a bottle of hot sauce — "use sparingly." Receiving a plus-one to a wedding is traditionally reserved for those with spouses, those who are engaged, or those in serious relationships. There are no rules about returning plus-one favors, or even giving them to those in your bridal party with serious relationships (though I personally feel that's the right thing to do, especially when you're asking people to spend a pretty penny).

Plus-ones are costly. If you're single, and you're still getting a plus-one to a wedding, the bride or groom must think that you're pretty special, so kudos to you! However, back to our rule of thumb: always use your plus one sparingly. Just because you are offered a date does not mean you need to bring one, especially if your only option is someone random from a dating app. If you’re single and wondering whether you should use your plus-one or not here are a few considerations to make before deciding what to do.


What To Do If You Get A Plus-One Invitation To A Wedding & You're Single AF

A wedding is one of a few traditions left in 2018 whose success is contingent on truly excellent behavior by all involved. Great wedding etiquette on the part of a host means organizing transportation, providing food, and courteously thanking all of the people who took time out of their lives to celebrate you finding your special person. Great wedding etiquette as a guest involves R.S.V.P.-ing in a timely manner, not throwing shade on the venue, and showing up with an appropriate guest, if you were offered the chance to bring one. If you've been offered a plus-one but you're single, that last consideration can be confusing.

As a 29-year-old woman who has been invited to her fair share of weddings with and without plus-ones, here is the most important rule of thumb when it comes to "do I ride solo or not?" Treat your plus-one like you'd treat a bottle of hot sauce — "use sparingly." Receiving a plus-one to a wedding is traditionally reserved for those with spouses, those who are engaged, or those in serious relationships. There are no rules about returning plus-one favors, or even giving them to those in your bridal party with serious relationships (though I personally feel that's the right thing to do, especially when you're asking people to spend a pretty penny).

Plus-ones are costly. If you're single, and you're still getting a plus-one to a wedding, the bride or groom must think that you're pretty special, so kudos to you! However, back to our rule of thumb: always use your plus one sparingly. Just because you are offered a date does not mean you need to bring one, especially if your only option is someone random from a dating app. If you’re single and wondering whether you should use your plus-one or not here are a few considerations to make before deciding what to do.


What To Do If You Get A Plus-One Invitation To A Wedding & You're Single AF

A wedding is one of a few traditions left in 2018 whose success is contingent on truly excellent behavior by all involved. Great wedding etiquette on the part of a host means organizing transportation, providing food, and courteously thanking all of the people who took time out of their lives to celebrate you finding your special person. Great wedding etiquette as a guest involves R.S.V.P.-ing in a timely manner, not throwing shade on the venue, and showing up with an appropriate guest, if you were offered the chance to bring one. If you've been offered a plus-one but you're single, that last consideration can be confusing.

As a 29-year-old woman who has been invited to her fair share of weddings with and without plus-ones, here is the most important rule of thumb when it comes to "do I ride solo or not?" Treat your plus-one like you'd treat a bottle of hot sauce — "use sparingly." Receiving a plus-one to a wedding is traditionally reserved for those with spouses, those who are engaged, or those in serious relationships. There are no rules about returning plus-one favors, or even giving them to those in your bridal party with serious relationships (though I personally feel that's the right thing to do, especially when you're asking people to spend a pretty penny).

Plus-ones are costly. If you're single, and you're still getting a plus-one to a wedding, the bride or groom must think that you're pretty special, so kudos to you! However, back to our rule of thumb: always use your plus one sparingly. Just because you are offered a date does not mean you need to bring one, especially if your only option is someone random from a dating app. If you’re single and wondering whether you should use your plus-one or not here are a few considerations to make before deciding what to do.