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Getting the Skinny on the Link Between Women's Weight and Their Paychecks

Getting the Skinny on the Link Between Women's Weight and Their Paychecks

A new study finds that skinnier women tend to incur a heftier income

Is there a link between a woman's weight and her salary?

As if there weren't already enough hurdles for women in the workplace, a new study suggests that the size of a woman has a bearing on the size of her paycheck.

The study comes from the Journal of Applied Psychology published in the fall of 2010. Findings show that women who are “very thin” make $22,000 more money than their “average weight” counterparts. And, at the other end of the scale, “very heavy” women were down $19,000 compared to average weight workers.

Men were also studied but, not surprisingly, there wasn't nearly as strong a correlation between their weight and their income.

I guess it's salad for lunch from now on.

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


Rethinking Fatness: Why Everything You&rsquove Been Told About Weight May Be Wrong

Automatically associating a large body with poor health is not only misguided, it can be dangerous.

Low-fat, low-carb, Paleo, keto, South Beach, intermittent fasting&mdashthe list goes on. Given that our culture idealizes thinness and shuns larger bodies, it&rsquos not surprising that nearly one in five midlife women has dieted in the past few years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And many have regained the weight and see themselves as having failed. Less than 1% of very large people got to a &ldquonormal&rdquo weight at all in a study that included almost 100,000 women, and most who did regained the pounds they had lost within five years.

Some medical experts are now saying what many of us have been desperate to hear: It&rsquos extremely tough to drop weight long-term, for reasons that have nothing to do with willpower&mdashand it may not even be necessary.

&ldquoThe dominant message people get from government, health organizations, and the media is that weight and health are connected. But really, there is no strong evidence to suggest that higher weight automatically leads to poorer health,&rdquo says Jeffrey Hunger, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology at Miami University of Ohio and a longtime weight-stigma researcher (and yes, that&rsquos his real name!).

If you&rsquore extremely large-bodied, dropping some pounds can protect your joints from arthritis and make it easier to exercise. But for most women over the &ldquoideal&rdquo weight, focusing on other health measures may be much more important than what the scale says.

So why isn&rsquot that a message you&rsquore likely to hear from your health care provider? &ldquoThe evidence has been piling up for years, but experts are so stuck in their beliefs, they don&rsquot accept anything to the contrary,&rdquo Hunger says. Add to this all the people and companies with financial interests in pumping out anti-fat messages, from diet purveyors to drug companies to book authors. Plus, the message that body fat is bad and needs to be diminished as much as possible is such gospel in our society that it&rsquos hard to believe it may not be true.

Here are eight important facts that many are overlooking. These realities may be just what you need to feel better about your body, whatever your weight.


Rethinking Fatness: Why Everything You&rsquove Been Told About Weight May Be Wrong

Automatically associating a large body with poor health is not only misguided, it can be dangerous.

Low-fat, low-carb, Paleo, keto, South Beach, intermittent fasting&mdashthe list goes on. Given that our culture idealizes thinness and shuns larger bodies, it&rsquos not surprising that nearly one in five midlife women has dieted in the past few years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And many have regained the weight and see themselves as having failed. Less than 1% of very large people got to a &ldquonormal&rdquo weight at all in a study that included almost 100,000 women, and most who did regained the pounds they had lost within five years.

Some medical experts are now saying what many of us have been desperate to hear: It&rsquos extremely tough to drop weight long-term, for reasons that have nothing to do with willpower&mdashand it may not even be necessary.

&ldquoThe dominant message people get from government, health organizations, and the media is that weight and health are connected. But really, there is no strong evidence to suggest that higher weight automatically leads to poorer health,&rdquo says Jeffrey Hunger, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology at Miami University of Ohio and a longtime weight-stigma researcher (and yes, that&rsquos his real name!).

If you&rsquore extremely large-bodied, dropping some pounds can protect your joints from arthritis and make it easier to exercise. But for most women over the &ldquoideal&rdquo weight, focusing on other health measures may be much more important than what the scale says.

So why isn&rsquot that a message you&rsquore likely to hear from your health care provider? &ldquoThe evidence has been piling up for years, but experts are so stuck in their beliefs, they don&rsquot accept anything to the contrary,&rdquo Hunger says. Add to this all the people and companies with financial interests in pumping out anti-fat messages, from diet purveyors to drug companies to book authors. Plus, the message that body fat is bad and needs to be diminished as much as possible is such gospel in our society that it&rsquos hard to believe it may not be true.

Here are eight important facts that many are overlooking. These realities may be just what you need to feel better about your body, whatever your weight.


Rethinking Fatness: Why Everything You&rsquove Been Told About Weight May Be Wrong

Automatically associating a large body with poor health is not only misguided, it can be dangerous.

Low-fat, low-carb, Paleo, keto, South Beach, intermittent fasting&mdashthe list goes on. Given that our culture idealizes thinness and shuns larger bodies, it&rsquos not surprising that nearly one in five midlife women has dieted in the past few years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And many have regained the weight and see themselves as having failed. Less than 1% of very large people got to a &ldquonormal&rdquo weight at all in a study that included almost 100,000 women, and most who did regained the pounds they had lost within five years.

Some medical experts are now saying what many of us have been desperate to hear: It&rsquos extremely tough to drop weight long-term, for reasons that have nothing to do with willpower&mdashand it may not even be necessary.

&ldquoThe dominant message people get from government, health organizations, and the media is that weight and health are connected. But really, there is no strong evidence to suggest that higher weight automatically leads to poorer health,&rdquo says Jeffrey Hunger, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology at Miami University of Ohio and a longtime weight-stigma researcher (and yes, that&rsquos his real name!).

If you&rsquore extremely large-bodied, dropping some pounds can protect your joints from arthritis and make it easier to exercise. But for most women over the &ldquoideal&rdquo weight, focusing on other health measures may be much more important than what the scale says.

So why isn&rsquot that a message you&rsquore likely to hear from your health care provider? &ldquoThe evidence has been piling up for years, but experts are so stuck in their beliefs, they don&rsquot accept anything to the contrary,&rdquo Hunger says. Add to this all the people and companies with financial interests in pumping out anti-fat messages, from diet purveyors to drug companies to book authors. Plus, the message that body fat is bad and needs to be diminished as much as possible is such gospel in our society that it&rsquos hard to believe it may not be true.

Here are eight important facts that many are overlooking. These realities may be just what you need to feel better about your body, whatever your weight.


Rethinking Fatness: Why Everything You&rsquove Been Told About Weight May Be Wrong

Automatically associating a large body with poor health is not only misguided, it can be dangerous.

Low-fat, low-carb, Paleo, keto, South Beach, intermittent fasting&mdashthe list goes on. Given that our culture idealizes thinness and shuns larger bodies, it&rsquos not surprising that nearly one in five midlife women has dieted in the past few years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And many have regained the weight and see themselves as having failed. Less than 1% of very large people got to a &ldquonormal&rdquo weight at all in a study that included almost 100,000 women, and most who did regained the pounds they had lost within five years.

Some medical experts are now saying what many of us have been desperate to hear: It&rsquos extremely tough to drop weight long-term, for reasons that have nothing to do with willpower&mdashand it may not even be necessary.

&ldquoThe dominant message people get from government, health organizations, and the media is that weight and health are connected. But really, there is no strong evidence to suggest that higher weight automatically leads to poorer health,&rdquo says Jeffrey Hunger, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology at Miami University of Ohio and a longtime weight-stigma researcher (and yes, that&rsquos his real name!).

If you&rsquore extremely large-bodied, dropping some pounds can protect your joints from arthritis and make it easier to exercise. But for most women over the &ldquoideal&rdquo weight, focusing on other health measures may be much more important than what the scale says.

So why isn&rsquot that a message you&rsquore likely to hear from your health care provider? &ldquoThe evidence has been piling up for years, but experts are so stuck in their beliefs, they don&rsquot accept anything to the contrary,&rdquo Hunger says. Add to this all the people and companies with financial interests in pumping out anti-fat messages, from diet purveyors to drug companies to book authors. Plus, the message that body fat is bad and needs to be diminished as much as possible is such gospel in our society that it&rsquos hard to believe it may not be true.

Here are eight important facts that many are overlooking. These realities may be just what you need to feel better about your body, whatever your weight.


Rethinking Fatness: Why Everything You&rsquove Been Told About Weight May Be Wrong

Automatically associating a large body with poor health is not only misguided, it can be dangerous.

Low-fat, low-carb, Paleo, keto, South Beach, intermittent fasting&mdashthe list goes on. Given that our culture idealizes thinness and shuns larger bodies, it&rsquos not surprising that nearly one in five midlife women has dieted in the past few years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And many have regained the weight and see themselves as having failed. Less than 1% of very large people got to a &ldquonormal&rdquo weight at all in a study that included almost 100,000 women, and most who did regained the pounds they had lost within five years.

Some medical experts are now saying what many of us have been desperate to hear: It&rsquos extremely tough to drop weight long-term, for reasons that have nothing to do with willpower&mdashand it may not even be necessary.

&ldquoThe dominant message people get from government, health organizations, and the media is that weight and health are connected. But really, there is no strong evidence to suggest that higher weight automatically leads to poorer health,&rdquo says Jeffrey Hunger, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology at Miami University of Ohio and a longtime weight-stigma researcher (and yes, that&rsquos his real name!).

If you&rsquore extremely large-bodied, dropping some pounds can protect your joints from arthritis and make it easier to exercise. But for most women over the &ldquoideal&rdquo weight, focusing on other health measures may be much more important than what the scale says.

So why isn&rsquot that a message you&rsquore likely to hear from your health care provider? &ldquoThe evidence has been piling up for years, but experts are so stuck in their beliefs, they don&rsquot accept anything to the contrary,&rdquo Hunger says. Add to this all the people and companies with financial interests in pumping out anti-fat messages, from diet purveyors to drug companies to book authors. Plus, the message that body fat is bad and needs to be diminished as much as possible is such gospel in our society that it&rsquos hard to believe it may not be true.

Here are eight important facts that many are overlooking. These realities may be just what you need to feel better about your body, whatever your weight.


Rethinking Fatness: Why Everything You&rsquove Been Told About Weight May Be Wrong

Automatically associating a large body with poor health is not only misguided, it can be dangerous.

Low-fat, low-carb, Paleo, keto, South Beach, intermittent fasting&mdashthe list goes on. Given that our culture idealizes thinness and shuns larger bodies, it&rsquos not surprising that nearly one in five midlife women has dieted in the past few years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And many have regained the weight and see themselves as having failed. Less than 1% of very large people got to a &ldquonormal&rdquo weight at all in a study that included almost 100,000 women, and most who did regained the pounds they had lost within five years.

Some medical experts are now saying what many of us have been desperate to hear: It&rsquos extremely tough to drop weight long-term, for reasons that have nothing to do with willpower&mdashand it may not even be necessary.

&ldquoThe dominant message people get from government, health organizations, and the media is that weight and health are connected. But really, there is no strong evidence to suggest that higher weight automatically leads to poorer health,&rdquo says Jeffrey Hunger, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology at Miami University of Ohio and a longtime weight-stigma researcher (and yes, that&rsquos his real name!).

If you&rsquore extremely large-bodied, dropping some pounds can protect your joints from arthritis and make it easier to exercise. But for most women over the &ldquoideal&rdquo weight, focusing on other health measures may be much more important than what the scale says.

So why isn&rsquot that a message you&rsquore likely to hear from your health care provider? &ldquoThe evidence has been piling up for years, but experts are so stuck in their beliefs, they don&rsquot accept anything to the contrary,&rdquo Hunger says. Add to this all the people and companies with financial interests in pumping out anti-fat messages, from diet purveyors to drug companies to book authors. Plus, the message that body fat is bad and needs to be diminished as much as possible is such gospel in our society that it&rsquos hard to believe it may not be true.

Here are eight important facts that many are overlooking. These realities may be just what you need to feel better about your body, whatever your weight.


Rethinking Fatness: Why Everything You&rsquove Been Told About Weight May Be Wrong

Automatically associating a large body with poor health is not only misguided, it can be dangerous.

Low-fat, low-carb, Paleo, keto, South Beach, intermittent fasting&mdashthe list goes on. Given that our culture idealizes thinness and shuns larger bodies, it&rsquos not surprising that nearly one in five midlife women has dieted in the past few years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And many have regained the weight and see themselves as having failed. Less than 1% of very large people got to a &ldquonormal&rdquo weight at all in a study that included almost 100,000 women, and most who did regained the pounds they had lost within five years.

Some medical experts are now saying what many of us have been desperate to hear: It&rsquos extremely tough to drop weight long-term, for reasons that have nothing to do with willpower&mdashand it may not even be necessary.

&ldquoThe dominant message people get from government, health organizations, and the media is that weight and health are connected. But really, there is no strong evidence to suggest that higher weight automatically leads to poorer health,&rdquo says Jeffrey Hunger, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology at Miami University of Ohio and a longtime weight-stigma researcher (and yes, that&rsquos his real name!).

If you&rsquore extremely large-bodied, dropping some pounds can protect your joints from arthritis and make it easier to exercise. But for most women over the &ldquoideal&rdquo weight, focusing on other health measures may be much more important than what the scale says.

So why isn&rsquot that a message you&rsquore likely to hear from your health care provider? &ldquoThe evidence has been piling up for years, but experts are so stuck in their beliefs, they don&rsquot accept anything to the contrary,&rdquo Hunger says. Add to this all the people and companies with financial interests in pumping out anti-fat messages, from diet purveyors to drug companies to book authors. Plus, the message that body fat is bad and needs to be diminished as much as possible is such gospel in our society that it&rsquos hard to believe it may not be true.

Here are eight important facts that many are overlooking. These realities may be just what you need to feel better about your body, whatever your weight.


Rethinking Fatness: Why Everything You&rsquove Been Told About Weight May Be Wrong

Automatically associating a large body with poor health is not only misguided, it can be dangerous.

Low-fat, low-carb, Paleo, keto, South Beach, intermittent fasting&mdashthe list goes on. Given that our culture idealizes thinness and shuns larger bodies, it&rsquos not surprising that nearly one in five midlife women has dieted in the past few years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And many have regained the weight and see themselves as having failed. Less than 1% of very large people got to a &ldquonormal&rdquo weight at all in a study that included almost 100,000 women, and most who did regained the pounds they had lost within five years.

Some medical experts are now saying what many of us have been desperate to hear: It&rsquos extremely tough to drop weight long-term, for reasons that have nothing to do with willpower&mdashand it may not even be necessary.

&ldquoThe dominant message people get from government, health organizations, and the media is that weight and health are connected. But really, there is no strong evidence to suggest that higher weight automatically leads to poorer health,&rdquo says Jeffrey Hunger, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology at Miami University of Ohio and a longtime weight-stigma researcher (and yes, that&rsquos his real name!).

If you&rsquore extremely large-bodied, dropping some pounds can protect your joints from arthritis and make it easier to exercise. But for most women over the &ldquoideal&rdquo weight, focusing on other health measures may be much more important than what the scale says.

So why isn&rsquot that a message you&rsquore likely to hear from your health care provider? &ldquoThe evidence has been piling up for years, but experts are so stuck in their beliefs, they don&rsquot accept anything to the contrary,&rdquo Hunger says. Add to this all the people and companies with financial interests in pumping out anti-fat messages, from diet purveyors to drug companies to book authors. Plus, the message that body fat is bad and needs to be diminished as much as possible is such gospel in our society that it&rsquos hard to believe it may not be true.

Here are eight important facts that many are overlooking. These realities may be just what you need to feel better about your body, whatever your weight.


Rethinking Fatness: Why Everything You&rsquove Been Told About Weight May Be Wrong

Automatically associating a large body with poor health is not only misguided, it can be dangerous.

Low-fat, low-carb, Paleo, keto, South Beach, intermittent fasting&mdashthe list goes on. Given that our culture idealizes thinness and shuns larger bodies, it&rsquos not surprising that nearly one in five midlife women has dieted in the past few years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And many have regained the weight and see themselves as having failed. Less than 1% of very large people got to a &ldquonormal&rdquo weight at all in a study that included almost 100,000 women, and most who did regained the pounds they had lost within five years.

Some medical experts are now saying what many of us have been desperate to hear: It&rsquos extremely tough to drop weight long-term, for reasons that have nothing to do with willpower&mdashand it may not even be necessary.

&ldquoThe dominant message people get from government, health organizations, and the media is that weight and health are connected. But really, there is no strong evidence to suggest that higher weight automatically leads to poorer health,&rdquo says Jeffrey Hunger, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology at Miami University of Ohio and a longtime weight-stigma researcher (and yes, that&rsquos his real name!).

If you&rsquore extremely large-bodied, dropping some pounds can protect your joints from arthritis and make it easier to exercise. But for most women over the &ldquoideal&rdquo weight, focusing on other health measures may be much more important than what the scale says.

So why isn&rsquot that a message you&rsquore likely to hear from your health care provider? &ldquoThe evidence has been piling up for years, but experts are so stuck in their beliefs, they don&rsquot accept anything to the contrary,&rdquo Hunger says. Add to this all the people and companies with financial interests in pumping out anti-fat messages, from diet purveyors to drug companies to book authors. Plus, the message that body fat is bad and needs to be diminished as much as possible is such gospel in our society that it&rsquos hard to believe it may not be true.

Here are eight important facts that many are overlooking. These realities may be just what you need to feel better about your body, whatever your weight.


Rethinking Fatness: Why Everything You&rsquove Been Told About Weight May Be Wrong

Automatically associating a large body with poor health is not only misguided, it can be dangerous.

Low-fat, low-carb, Paleo, keto, South Beach, intermittent fasting&mdashthe list goes on. Given that our culture idealizes thinness and shuns larger bodies, it&rsquos not surprising that nearly one in five midlife women has dieted in the past few years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And many have regained the weight and see themselves as having failed. Less than 1% of very large people got to a &ldquonormal&rdquo weight at all in a study that included almost 100,000 women, and most who did regained the pounds they had lost within five years.

Some medical experts are now saying what many of us have been desperate to hear: It&rsquos extremely tough to drop weight long-term, for reasons that have nothing to do with willpower&mdashand it may not even be necessary.

&ldquoThe dominant message people get from government, health organizations, and the media is that weight and health are connected. But really, there is no strong evidence to suggest that higher weight automatically leads to poorer health,&rdquo says Jeffrey Hunger, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology at Miami University of Ohio and a longtime weight-stigma researcher (and yes, that&rsquos his real name!).

If you&rsquore extremely large-bodied, dropping some pounds can protect your joints from arthritis and make it easier to exercise. But for most women over the &ldquoideal&rdquo weight, focusing on other health measures may be much more important than what the scale says.

So why isn&rsquot that a message you&rsquore likely to hear from your health care provider? &ldquoThe evidence has been piling up for years, but experts are so stuck in their beliefs, they don&rsquot accept anything to the contrary,&rdquo Hunger says. Add to this all the people and companies with financial interests in pumping out anti-fat messages, from diet purveyors to drug companies to book authors. Plus, the message that body fat is bad and needs to be diminished as much as possible is such gospel in our society that it&rsquos hard to believe it may not be true.

Here are eight important facts that many are overlooking. These realities may be just what you need to feel better about your body, whatever your weight.


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