Traditional recipes

How to Make Your Own Twinkies at Home Slideshow

How to Make Your Own Twinkies at Home Slideshow

Emily Jacobs

The first hurdle in creating a Twinkie is getting that rectangular shape. Although there aren't many baking pans out there that provide that shape, we figured out an easy way to achieve it without making a trip to the store. Using some aluminum foil and a spice jar, we formed little "Twinkie molds" to bake our treats in.

The Shape

Emily Jacobs

The first hurdle in creating a Twinkie is getting that rectangular shape. Using some aluminum foil and a spice jar, we formed little "Twinkie molds" to bake our treats in.

The Batter

Emily Jacobs

The next step in creating a Twinkie was figuring out what kind of batter we wanted to make. Everyone can agree that Twinkies are more than just yellow cake mix, and we decided that they’re most closely related to a pound cake, and so we wrote a recipe based off that. A little bit of cream of tartar mixed into the batter provides that moist, silky texture we all love about Twinkies.

Filling the Twinkie

Emily Jacobs

Once our Twinkies were baked, we had to figure out a way to fill them. We took wooden skewers and used the blunt end to poke two holes in the bottom of the cakes.

The Icing

Emily Jacobs

For the icing, we mixed together a simple combination of margarine, shortening, powdered sugar, and vanilla extract. We then transferred the icing to a piping bag that had a ¼-inch tip and piped the icing into the little holes that we made.

The Result

Emily Jacobs

Our Twinkies recipe was a success, and we were able to breathe a sigh of relief while watching news reports about Twinkies going extinct. Not only does our recipe taste like the real thing, but we’re happy to say that it’s healthier, too, as it's made in the comfort of our own kitchen without any additives.

Click here to see the Homemade Twinkies Recipe


How To Make Your Own Twinkies At Home

With Hostess going out of business, the fate of the Twinkie hangs in the balance—they could disappear forever, or the recipe could be sold and our children and our children's children will never have to live in a world without America's most preservative-filled treat. But it's always good to have a back-up plan should the former happen, so here's a recipe for how to make your own Twinkies at home. and good news for vegetarians: if you make your own, you can skip the beef fat that Hostess adds in.

Want that recipe without the Australian accent? Here it is in black & yellow. but you'll notice that none of the recipes include Hostess's secret ingredients: sorbic acid, cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. You might consider frying 'er up just to mask the embarrassing absence of monoglycerides and diglycerides.

And what about the other Hostess treats? The easiest one to make is their famous squiggly-lined cupcake—learn how to best transform that boring chocolate cupcake into a Hostess one, here:

And while we couldn't find a recipe for Snowballs, meet Liz. who has incorporated the treat into the world's most horrifying Baked Alaska, which contains precious few natural colors found in real life:


How To Make Your Own Twinkies At Home

With Hostess going out of business, the fate of the Twinkie hangs in the balance—they could disappear forever, or the recipe could be sold and our children and our children's children will never have to live in a world without America's most preservative-filled treat. But it's always good to have a back-up plan should the former happen, so here's a recipe for how to make your own Twinkies at home. and good news for vegetarians: if you make your own, you can skip the beef fat that Hostess adds in.

Want that recipe without the Australian accent? Here it is in black & yellow. but you'll notice that none of the recipes include Hostess's secret ingredients: sorbic acid, cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. You might consider frying 'er up just to mask the embarrassing absence of monoglycerides and diglycerides.

And what about the other Hostess treats? The easiest one to make is their famous squiggly-lined cupcake—learn how to best transform that boring chocolate cupcake into a Hostess one, here:

And while we couldn't find a recipe for Snowballs, meet Liz. who has incorporated the treat into the world's most horrifying Baked Alaska, which contains precious few natural colors found in real life:


How To Make Your Own Twinkies At Home

With Hostess going out of business, the fate of the Twinkie hangs in the balance—they could disappear forever, or the recipe could be sold and our children and our children's children will never have to live in a world without America's most preservative-filled treat. But it's always good to have a back-up plan should the former happen, so here's a recipe for how to make your own Twinkies at home. and good news for vegetarians: if you make your own, you can skip the beef fat that Hostess adds in.

Want that recipe without the Australian accent? Here it is in black & yellow. but you'll notice that none of the recipes include Hostess's secret ingredients: sorbic acid, cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. You might consider frying 'er up just to mask the embarrassing absence of monoglycerides and diglycerides.

And what about the other Hostess treats? The easiest one to make is their famous squiggly-lined cupcake—learn how to best transform that boring chocolate cupcake into a Hostess one, here:

And while we couldn't find a recipe for Snowballs, meet Liz. who has incorporated the treat into the world's most horrifying Baked Alaska, which contains precious few natural colors found in real life:


How To Make Your Own Twinkies At Home

With Hostess going out of business, the fate of the Twinkie hangs in the balance—they could disappear forever, or the recipe could be sold and our children and our children's children will never have to live in a world without America's most preservative-filled treat. But it's always good to have a back-up plan should the former happen, so here's a recipe for how to make your own Twinkies at home. and good news for vegetarians: if you make your own, you can skip the beef fat that Hostess adds in.

Want that recipe without the Australian accent? Here it is in black & yellow. but you'll notice that none of the recipes include Hostess's secret ingredients: sorbic acid, cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. You might consider frying 'er up just to mask the embarrassing absence of monoglycerides and diglycerides.

And what about the other Hostess treats? The easiest one to make is their famous squiggly-lined cupcake—learn how to best transform that boring chocolate cupcake into a Hostess one, here:

And while we couldn't find a recipe for Snowballs, meet Liz. who has incorporated the treat into the world's most horrifying Baked Alaska, which contains precious few natural colors found in real life:


How To Make Your Own Twinkies At Home

With Hostess going out of business, the fate of the Twinkie hangs in the balance—they could disappear forever, or the recipe could be sold and our children and our children's children will never have to live in a world without America's most preservative-filled treat. But it's always good to have a back-up plan should the former happen, so here's a recipe for how to make your own Twinkies at home. and good news for vegetarians: if you make your own, you can skip the beef fat that Hostess adds in.

Want that recipe without the Australian accent? Here it is in black & yellow. but you'll notice that none of the recipes include Hostess's secret ingredients: sorbic acid, cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. You might consider frying 'er up just to mask the embarrassing absence of monoglycerides and diglycerides.

And what about the other Hostess treats? The easiest one to make is their famous squiggly-lined cupcake—learn how to best transform that boring chocolate cupcake into a Hostess one, here:

And while we couldn't find a recipe for Snowballs, meet Liz. who has incorporated the treat into the world's most horrifying Baked Alaska, which contains precious few natural colors found in real life:


How To Make Your Own Twinkies At Home

With Hostess going out of business, the fate of the Twinkie hangs in the balance—they could disappear forever, or the recipe could be sold and our children and our children's children will never have to live in a world without America's most preservative-filled treat. But it's always good to have a back-up plan should the former happen, so here's a recipe for how to make your own Twinkies at home. and good news for vegetarians: if you make your own, you can skip the beef fat that Hostess adds in.

Want that recipe without the Australian accent? Here it is in black & yellow. but you'll notice that none of the recipes include Hostess's secret ingredients: sorbic acid, cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. You might consider frying 'er up just to mask the embarrassing absence of monoglycerides and diglycerides.

And what about the other Hostess treats? The easiest one to make is their famous squiggly-lined cupcake—learn how to best transform that boring chocolate cupcake into a Hostess one, here:

And while we couldn't find a recipe for Snowballs, meet Liz. who has incorporated the treat into the world's most horrifying Baked Alaska, which contains precious few natural colors found in real life:


How To Make Your Own Twinkies At Home

With Hostess going out of business, the fate of the Twinkie hangs in the balance—they could disappear forever, or the recipe could be sold and our children and our children's children will never have to live in a world without America's most preservative-filled treat. But it's always good to have a back-up plan should the former happen, so here's a recipe for how to make your own Twinkies at home. and good news for vegetarians: if you make your own, you can skip the beef fat that Hostess adds in.

Want that recipe without the Australian accent? Here it is in black & yellow. but you'll notice that none of the recipes include Hostess's secret ingredients: sorbic acid, cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. You might consider frying 'er up just to mask the embarrassing absence of monoglycerides and diglycerides.

And what about the other Hostess treats? The easiest one to make is their famous squiggly-lined cupcake—learn how to best transform that boring chocolate cupcake into a Hostess one, here:

And while we couldn't find a recipe for Snowballs, meet Liz. who has incorporated the treat into the world's most horrifying Baked Alaska, which contains precious few natural colors found in real life:


How To Make Your Own Twinkies At Home

With Hostess going out of business, the fate of the Twinkie hangs in the balance—they could disappear forever, or the recipe could be sold and our children and our children's children will never have to live in a world without America's most preservative-filled treat. But it's always good to have a back-up plan should the former happen, so here's a recipe for how to make your own Twinkies at home. and good news for vegetarians: if you make your own, you can skip the beef fat that Hostess adds in.

Want that recipe without the Australian accent? Here it is in black & yellow. but you'll notice that none of the recipes include Hostess's secret ingredients: sorbic acid, cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. You might consider frying 'er up just to mask the embarrassing absence of monoglycerides and diglycerides.

And what about the other Hostess treats? The easiest one to make is their famous squiggly-lined cupcake—learn how to best transform that boring chocolate cupcake into a Hostess one, here:

And while we couldn't find a recipe for Snowballs, meet Liz. who has incorporated the treat into the world's most horrifying Baked Alaska, which contains precious few natural colors found in real life:


How To Make Your Own Twinkies At Home

With Hostess going out of business, the fate of the Twinkie hangs in the balance—they could disappear forever, or the recipe could be sold and our children and our children's children will never have to live in a world without America's most preservative-filled treat. But it's always good to have a back-up plan should the former happen, so here's a recipe for how to make your own Twinkies at home. and good news for vegetarians: if you make your own, you can skip the beef fat that Hostess adds in.

Want that recipe without the Australian accent? Here it is in black & yellow. but you'll notice that none of the recipes include Hostess's secret ingredients: sorbic acid, cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. You might consider frying 'er up just to mask the embarrassing absence of monoglycerides and diglycerides.

And what about the other Hostess treats? The easiest one to make is their famous squiggly-lined cupcake—learn how to best transform that boring chocolate cupcake into a Hostess one, here:

And while we couldn't find a recipe for Snowballs, meet Liz. who has incorporated the treat into the world's most horrifying Baked Alaska, which contains precious few natural colors found in real life:


How To Make Your Own Twinkies At Home

With Hostess going out of business, the fate of the Twinkie hangs in the balance—they could disappear forever, or the recipe could be sold and our children and our children's children will never have to live in a world without America's most preservative-filled treat. But it's always good to have a back-up plan should the former happen, so here's a recipe for how to make your own Twinkies at home. and good news for vegetarians: if you make your own, you can skip the beef fat that Hostess adds in.

Want that recipe without the Australian accent? Here it is in black & yellow. but you'll notice that none of the recipes include Hostess's secret ingredients: sorbic acid, cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. You might consider frying 'er up just to mask the embarrassing absence of monoglycerides and diglycerides.

And what about the other Hostess treats? The easiest one to make is their famous squiggly-lined cupcake—learn how to best transform that boring chocolate cupcake into a Hostess one, here:

And while we couldn't find a recipe for Snowballs, meet Liz. who has incorporated the treat into the world's most horrifying Baked Alaska, which contains precious few natural colors found in real life:


Watch the video: Twinkies are back! (December 2021).