Traditional recipes

Maple Bacon Hot Chocolate

Maple Bacon Hot Chocolate

Ingredients

Candied Bacon:

5 strips good quality bacon, diced

2½ tablespoons brown sugar

Hot Chocolate:

2 cups milk (or non-dairy substitute)

5 ounces dark chocolate, chopped

½ teaspoon maple sugar

1 teaspoon maple syrup

Whipped Cream:

½ cup cold heavy whipping cream

¼ teaspoon pure vanilla extract

½ tablespoon maple sugar/maple syrup

Pinch sea salt flakes

Directions

Candied Bacon:

In a skillet, over medium heat, add in diced bacon.

Once it starts rendering, add in brown sugar.

Stir frequently to keep the bacon and brown sugar mixing and cooking.

Once it is golden and crispy, remove candied bacon bits using a slotted spoon, placing on a paper-towel-lined plate; allow to cool.

Hot Chocolate:

Place the milk, maple syrup, and maple sugar in a saucepan over medium heat and whisk until the mixture just reaches the boiling point.

Remove from heat and whisk in chopped chocolate until smooth and dissolved.

Whipped Cream:

In your mixing bowl, place the whipping cream, vanilla extract, and sugar, and stir to combine.

Cover and chill the bowl and wire whisk in the refrigerator for about 30 minutes.

When chilled, beat the mixture until stiff peaks form.

Assembly:

Pour the hot chocolate into two cups and garnish with a dollop of whipped cream.

Sprinkle with candied bacon bits and a tiny bit of the sea salt and grated chocolate.

Preparation time: about 10 minutes, plus 10 minutes for candied bacon.


Is it possible to make bacon even better? That might seem like a ridiculous question, but homemade bacon is indeed superior to the already delicious store-bought stuff! And while waiting out the curing takes some patience, I think you’ll find the overall process to be surprisingly simple.

It Starts with Pork Belly

The first step in your bacon journey is getting your hands on some pork belly. While it’s not a common ingredient, it shouldn’t be too hard to find. If your grocery store doesn’t have it, your butcher definitely should. Pork belly is also common in Asian dishes, so check out your local Asian market if necessary.

Pork belly is sometimes sold with the hard outer skin on, but you’ll want a piece without the skin. It’s not too difficult to remove, but definitely ask your butcher to slice it off if possible. Not only is it more convenient that way, but you won’t be paying for the weight of the skin.

A Note on Pink Curing Salt

The first of our two major steps is curing, and this calls for pink curing salt, also known as Prague Powder #1. Curing salt (which is not the same as pink Himalayan salt) keeps fat from going rancid and protects against bacteria like botulism.

However, many people hesitate to use curing salt because it contains nitrates, which produce nitrites during the curing process. Nitrites have been linked to cancer by some studies. I can’t speak on the safety of consuming cured meats, but I will point out that my recipe below includes only a very small amount of curing salt - less than 1 teaspoon.

If you would like to omit pink curing salt, that’s definitely okay. After all, your bacon will be hot smoked to a safe temperature rather than cold smoked. As long as you refrigerate and freeze it just as you would any other meat, it will be perfectly fine. Just note that your bacon won’t be the typical pink color without it, and will instead be more dull and gray (imagine the color of a cooked pork loin, for example).


Is it possible to make bacon even better? That might seem like a ridiculous question, but homemade bacon is indeed superior to the already delicious store-bought stuff! And while waiting out the curing takes some patience, I think you’ll find the overall process to be surprisingly simple.

It Starts with Pork Belly

The first step in your bacon journey is getting your hands on some pork belly. While it’s not a common ingredient, it shouldn’t be too hard to find. If your grocery store doesn’t have it, your butcher definitely should. Pork belly is also common in Asian dishes, so check out your local Asian market if necessary.

Pork belly is sometimes sold with the hard outer skin on, but you’ll want a piece without the skin. It’s not too difficult to remove, but definitely ask your butcher to slice it off if possible. Not only is it more convenient that way, but you won’t be paying for the weight of the skin.

A Note on Pink Curing Salt

The first of our two major steps is curing, and this calls for pink curing salt, also known as Prague Powder #1. Curing salt (which is not the same as pink Himalayan salt) keeps fat from going rancid and protects against bacteria like botulism.

However, many people hesitate to use curing salt because it contains nitrates, which produce nitrites during the curing process. Nitrites have been linked to cancer by some studies. I can’t speak on the safety of consuming cured meats, but I will point out that my recipe below includes only a very small amount of curing salt - less than 1 teaspoon.

If you would like to omit pink curing salt, that’s definitely okay. After all, your bacon will be hot smoked to a safe temperature rather than cold smoked. As long as you refrigerate and freeze it just as you would any other meat, it will be perfectly fine. Just note that your bacon won’t be the typical pink color without it, and will instead be more dull and gray (imagine the color of a cooked pork loin, for example).


Is it possible to make bacon even better? That might seem like a ridiculous question, but homemade bacon is indeed superior to the already delicious store-bought stuff! And while waiting out the curing takes some patience, I think you’ll find the overall process to be surprisingly simple.

It Starts with Pork Belly

The first step in your bacon journey is getting your hands on some pork belly. While it’s not a common ingredient, it shouldn’t be too hard to find. If your grocery store doesn’t have it, your butcher definitely should. Pork belly is also common in Asian dishes, so check out your local Asian market if necessary.

Pork belly is sometimes sold with the hard outer skin on, but you’ll want a piece without the skin. It’s not too difficult to remove, but definitely ask your butcher to slice it off if possible. Not only is it more convenient that way, but you won’t be paying for the weight of the skin.

A Note on Pink Curing Salt

The first of our two major steps is curing, and this calls for pink curing salt, also known as Prague Powder #1. Curing salt (which is not the same as pink Himalayan salt) keeps fat from going rancid and protects against bacteria like botulism.

However, many people hesitate to use curing salt because it contains nitrates, which produce nitrites during the curing process. Nitrites have been linked to cancer by some studies. I can’t speak on the safety of consuming cured meats, but I will point out that my recipe below includes only a very small amount of curing salt - less than 1 teaspoon.

If you would like to omit pink curing salt, that’s definitely okay. After all, your bacon will be hot smoked to a safe temperature rather than cold smoked. As long as you refrigerate and freeze it just as you would any other meat, it will be perfectly fine. Just note that your bacon won’t be the typical pink color without it, and will instead be more dull and gray (imagine the color of a cooked pork loin, for example).


Is it possible to make bacon even better? That might seem like a ridiculous question, but homemade bacon is indeed superior to the already delicious store-bought stuff! And while waiting out the curing takes some patience, I think you’ll find the overall process to be surprisingly simple.

It Starts with Pork Belly

The first step in your bacon journey is getting your hands on some pork belly. While it’s not a common ingredient, it shouldn’t be too hard to find. If your grocery store doesn’t have it, your butcher definitely should. Pork belly is also common in Asian dishes, so check out your local Asian market if necessary.

Pork belly is sometimes sold with the hard outer skin on, but you’ll want a piece without the skin. It’s not too difficult to remove, but definitely ask your butcher to slice it off if possible. Not only is it more convenient that way, but you won’t be paying for the weight of the skin.

A Note on Pink Curing Salt

The first of our two major steps is curing, and this calls for pink curing salt, also known as Prague Powder #1. Curing salt (which is not the same as pink Himalayan salt) keeps fat from going rancid and protects against bacteria like botulism.

However, many people hesitate to use curing salt because it contains nitrates, which produce nitrites during the curing process. Nitrites have been linked to cancer by some studies. I can’t speak on the safety of consuming cured meats, but I will point out that my recipe below includes only a very small amount of curing salt - less than 1 teaspoon.

If you would like to omit pink curing salt, that’s definitely okay. After all, your bacon will be hot smoked to a safe temperature rather than cold smoked. As long as you refrigerate and freeze it just as you would any other meat, it will be perfectly fine. Just note that your bacon won’t be the typical pink color without it, and will instead be more dull and gray (imagine the color of a cooked pork loin, for example).


Is it possible to make bacon even better? That might seem like a ridiculous question, but homemade bacon is indeed superior to the already delicious store-bought stuff! And while waiting out the curing takes some patience, I think you’ll find the overall process to be surprisingly simple.

It Starts with Pork Belly

The first step in your bacon journey is getting your hands on some pork belly. While it’s not a common ingredient, it shouldn’t be too hard to find. If your grocery store doesn’t have it, your butcher definitely should. Pork belly is also common in Asian dishes, so check out your local Asian market if necessary.

Pork belly is sometimes sold with the hard outer skin on, but you’ll want a piece without the skin. It’s not too difficult to remove, but definitely ask your butcher to slice it off if possible. Not only is it more convenient that way, but you won’t be paying for the weight of the skin.

A Note on Pink Curing Salt

The first of our two major steps is curing, and this calls for pink curing salt, also known as Prague Powder #1. Curing salt (which is not the same as pink Himalayan salt) keeps fat from going rancid and protects against bacteria like botulism.

However, many people hesitate to use curing salt because it contains nitrates, which produce nitrites during the curing process. Nitrites have been linked to cancer by some studies. I can’t speak on the safety of consuming cured meats, but I will point out that my recipe below includes only a very small amount of curing salt - less than 1 teaspoon.

If you would like to omit pink curing salt, that’s definitely okay. After all, your bacon will be hot smoked to a safe temperature rather than cold smoked. As long as you refrigerate and freeze it just as you would any other meat, it will be perfectly fine. Just note that your bacon won’t be the typical pink color without it, and will instead be more dull and gray (imagine the color of a cooked pork loin, for example).


Is it possible to make bacon even better? That might seem like a ridiculous question, but homemade bacon is indeed superior to the already delicious store-bought stuff! And while waiting out the curing takes some patience, I think you’ll find the overall process to be surprisingly simple.

It Starts with Pork Belly

The first step in your bacon journey is getting your hands on some pork belly. While it’s not a common ingredient, it shouldn’t be too hard to find. If your grocery store doesn’t have it, your butcher definitely should. Pork belly is also common in Asian dishes, so check out your local Asian market if necessary.

Pork belly is sometimes sold with the hard outer skin on, but you’ll want a piece without the skin. It’s not too difficult to remove, but definitely ask your butcher to slice it off if possible. Not only is it more convenient that way, but you won’t be paying for the weight of the skin.

A Note on Pink Curing Salt

The first of our two major steps is curing, and this calls for pink curing salt, also known as Prague Powder #1. Curing salt (which is not the same as pink Himalayan salt) keeps fat from going rancid and protects against bacteria like botulism.

However, many people hesitate to use curing salt because it contains nitrates, which produce nitrites during the curing process. Nitrites have been linked to cancer by some studies. I can’t speak on the safety of consuming cured meats, but I will point out that my recipe below includes only a very small amount of curing salt - less than 1 teaspoon.

If you would like to omit pink curing salt, that’s definitely okay. After all, your bacon will be hot smoked to a safe temperature rather than cold smoked. As long as you refrigerate and freeze it just as you would any other meat, it will be perfectly fine. Just note that your bacon won’t be the typical pink color without it, and will instead be more dull and gray (imagine the color of a cooked pork loin, for example).


Is it possible to make bacon even better? That might seem like a ridiculous question, but homemade bacon is indeed superior to the already delicious store-bought stuff! And while waiting out the curing takes some patience, I think you’ll find the overall process to be surprisingly simple.

It Starts with Pork Belly

The first step in your bacon journey is getting your hands on some pork belly. While it’s not a common ingredient, it shouldn’t be too hard to find. If your grocery store doesn’t have it, your butcher definitely should. Pork belly is also common in Asian dishes, so check out your local Asian market if necessary.

Pork belly is sometimes sold with the hard outer skin on, but you’ll want a piece without the skin. It’s not too difficult to remove, but definitely ask your butcher to slice it off if possible. Not only is it more convenient that way, but you won’t be paying for the weight of the skin.

A Note on Pink Curing Salt

The first of our two major steps is curing, and this calls for pink curing salt, also known as Prague Powder #1. Curing salt (which is not the same as pink Himalayan salt) keeps fat from going rancid and protects against bacteria like botulism.

However, many people hesitate to use curing salt because it contains nitrates, which produce nitrites during the curing process. Nitrites have been linked to cancer by some studies. I can’t speak on the safety of consuming cured meats, but I will point out that my recipe below includes only a very small amount of curing salt - less than 1 teaspoon.

If you would like to omit pink curing salt, that’s definitely okay. After all, your bacon will be hot smoked to a safe temperature rather than cold smoked. As long as you refrigerate and freeze it just as you would any other meat, it will be perfectly fine. Just note that your bacon won’t be the typical pink color without it, and will instead be more dull and gray (imagine the color of a cooked pork loin, for example).


Is it possible to make bacon even better? That might seem like a ridiculous question, but homemade bacon is indeed superior to the already delicious store-bought stuff! And while waiting out the curing takes some patience, I think you’ll find the overall process to be surprisingly simple.

It Starts with Pork Belly

The first step in your bacon journey is getting your hands on some pork belly. While it’s not a common ingredient, it shouldn’t be too hard to find. If your grocery store doesn’t have it, your butcher definitely should. Pork belly is also common in Asian dishes, so check out your local Asian market if necessary.

Pork belly is sometimes sold with the hard outer skin on, but you’ll want a piece without the skin. It’s not too difficult to remove, but definitely ask your butcher to slice it off if possible. Not only is it more convenient that way, but you won’t be paying for the weight of the skin.

A Note on Pink Curing Salt

The first of our two major steps is curing, and this calls for pink curing salt, also known as Prague Powder #1. Curing salt (which is not the same as pink Himalayan salt) keeps fat from going rancid and protects against bacteria like botulism.

However, many people hesitate to use curing salt because it contains nitrates, which produce nitrites during the curing process. Nitrites have been linked to cancer by some studies. I can’t speak on the safety of consuming cured meats, but I will point out that my recipe below includes only a very small amount of curing salt - less than 1 teaspoon.

If you would like to omit pink curing salt, that’s definitely okay. After all, your bacon will be hot smoked to a safe temperature rather than cold smoked. As long as you refrigerate and freeze it just as you would any other meat, it will be perfectly fine. Just note that your bacon won’t be the typical pink color without it, and will instead be more dull and gray (imagine the color of a cooked pork loin, for example).


Is it possible to make bacon even better? That might seem like a ridiculous question, but homemade bacon is indeed superior to the already delicious store-bought stuff! And while waiting out the curing takes some patience, I think you’ll find the overall process to be surprisingly simple.

It Starts with Pork Belly

The first step in your bacon journey is getting your hands on some pork belly. While it’s not a common ingredient, it shouldn’t be too hard to find. If your grocery store doesn’t have it, your butcher definitely should. Pork belly is also common in Asian dishes, so check out your local Asian market if necessary.

Pork belly is sometimes sold with the hard outer skin on, but you’ll want a piece without the skin. It’s not too difficult to remove, but definitely ask your butcher to slice it off if possible. Not only is it more convenient that way, but you won’t be paying for the weight of the skin.

A Note on Pink Curing Salt

The first of our two major steps is curing, and this calls for pink curing salt, also known as Prague Powder #1. Curing salt (which is not the same as pink Himalayan salt) keeps fat from going rancid and protects against bacteria like botulism.

However, many people hesitate to use curing salt because it contains nitrates, which produce nitrites during the curing process. Nitrites have been linked to cancer by some studies. I can’t speak on the safety of consuming cured meats, but I will point out that my recipe below includes only a very small amount of curing salt - less than 1 teaspoon.

If you would like to omit pink curing salt, that’s definitely okay. After all, your bacon will be hot smoked to a safe temperature rather than cold smoked. As long as you refrigerate and freeze it just as you would any other meat, it will be perfectly fine. Just note that your bacon won’t be the typical pink color without it, and will instead be more dull and gray (imagine the color of a cooked pork loin, for example).


Is it possible to make bacon even better? That might seem like a ridiculous question, but homemade bacon is indeed superior to the already delicious store-bought stuff! And while waiting out the curing takes some patience, I think you’ll find the overall process to be surprisingly simple.

It Starts with Pork Belly

The first step in your bacon journey is getting your hands on some pork belly. While it’s not a common ingredient, it shouldn’t be too hard to find. If your grocery store doesn’t have it, your butcher definitely should. Pork belly is also common in Asian dishes, so check out your local Asian market if necessary.

Pork belly is sometimes sold with the hard outer skin on, but you’ll want a piece without the skin. It’s not too difficult to remove, but definitely ask your butcher to slice it off if possible. Not only is it more convenient that way, but you won’t be paying for the weight of the skin.

A Note on Pink Curing Salt

The first of our two major steps is curing, and this calls for pink curing salt, also known as Prague Powder #1. Curing salt (which is not the same as pink Himalayan salt) keeps fat from going rancid and protects against bacteria like botulism.

However, many people hesitate to use curing salt because it contains nitrates, which produce nitrites during the curing process. Nitrites have been linked to cancer by some studies. I can’t speak on the safety of consuming cured meats, but I will point out that my recipe below includes only a very small amount of curing salt - less than 1 teaspoon.

If you would like to omit pink curing salt, that’s definitely okay. After all, your bacon will be hot smoked to a safe temperature rather than cold smoked. As long as you refrigerate and freeze it just as you would any other meat, it will be perfectly fine. Just note that your bacon won’t be the typical pink color without it, and will instead be more dull and gray (imagine the color of a cooked pork loin, for example).


Watch the video: MAPLE BACON HOT CHOCOLATE REVIEW wKILLER KYLE (November 2021).