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Subway Accused of Making Short Sandwiches, Now Has to Measure Every Footlong Sub

Subway Accused of Making Short Sandwiches, Now Has to Measure Every Footlong Sub

Following a lawsuit, Subway’s court agreement requires the sandwich chain to measure every 6-inch and 12-inch sub

Another day, another deceitful sandwich.

Have you ever bought a Subway foot-long and thought, “Gee, this seems a few bites short”? Well, it turns out your hunches may have been on the mark.Subway has just reached a settlement agreement in a 2013 lawsuit that accused Subway sandwich artists of coming up short. Now Subway will have to measure each of their six-inch and footlong rolls to make sure they are true-to-size, according to Nation’s Restaurant News.

The lawsuit reached class action status following a photo of Australian Matt Corby posing with a Subway sandwich and a tape measurer that barely came to 11 inches. As a result of the lawsuit Subway will have to provide amended training materials to employees which had originally “allowed for a small tolerance in the size of a footlong sandwich” to mandate that sandwiches must measure the full 12 inches. Subway will also begin enforcing stricter penalties for franchises that fail to follow these guidelines.

A hearing for final approval of the agreed terms has been set for January 2016, and plaintiffs could be awarded up to $1,000 as well as coverage of the $525,000 in legal fees.


People Who Tried To Scam Fast Food Restaurants And Failed

Americans have been accused of being too quick to sue. What might be more accurate is that some people are too quick to abuse the legal system and sue over ridiculous circumstances. Maybe it's because fast food restaurants are so abundant (and successful), but something about them acts as a magnet for those looking to scam some big cash. There don't appear to be any statistics for how many lawsuits are brought against fast food companies every year, but they certainly aren't a legal rarity.

Arguably the most well-known fast food lawsuit is the hot coffee McDonald's lawsuit of the 1990s. Stella Liebeck sued McDonald's after spilling hot coffee on herself and receiving third-degree burns. Her suit placed blame on McDonald's for making the coffee too hot and Liebeck walked away with an undisclosed amount of money (less than $600,000). Crooks and fraudsters around the nation instantly had dollar signs in their eyes.

From disagreements over napkins to wrong orders and contest crime rings, here are some of the worst offenders when it comes to fast food scams and hustles that totally failed.


People Who Tried To Scam Fast Food Restaurants And Failed

Americans have been accused of being too quick to sue. What might be more accurate is that some people are too quick to abuse the legal system and sue over ridiculous circumstances. Maybe it's because fast food restaurants are so abundant (and successful), but something about them acts as a magnet for those looking to scam some big cash. There don't appear to be any statistics for how many lawsuits are brought against fast food companies every year, but they certainly aren't a legal rarity.

Arguably the most well-known fast food lawsuit is the hot coffee McDonald's lawsuit of the 1990s. Stella Liebeck sued McDonald's after spilling hot coffee on herself and receiving third-degree burns. Her suit placed blame on McDonald's for making the coffee too hot and Liebeck walked away with an undisclosed amount of money (less than $600,000). Crooks and fraudsters around the nation instantly had dollar signs in their eyes.

From disagreements over napkins to wrong orders and contest crime rings, here are some of the worst offenders when it comes to fast food scams and hustles that totally failed.


People Who Tried To Scam Fast Food Restaurants And Failed

Americans have been accused of being too quick to sue. What might be more accurate is that some people are too quick to abuse the legal system and sue over ridiculous circumstances. Maybe it's because fast food restaurants are so abundant (and successful), but something about them acts as a magnet for those looking to scam some big cash. There don't appear to be any statistics for how many lawsuits are brought against fast food companies every year, but they certainly aren't a legal rarity.

Arguably the most well-known fast food lawsuit is the hot coffee McDonald's lawsuit of the 1990s. Stella Liebeck sued McDonald's after spilling hot coffee on herself and receiving third-degree burns. Her suit placed blame on McDonald's for making the coffee too hot and Liebeck walked away with an undisclosed amount of money (less than $600,000). Crooks and fraudsters around the nation instantly had dollar signs in their eyes.

From disagreements over napkins to wrong orders and contest crime rings, here are some of the worst offenders when it comes to fast food scams and hustles that totally failed.


People Who Tried To Scam Fast Food Restaurants And Failed

Americans have been accused of being too quick to sue. What might be more accurate is that some people are too quick to abuse the legal system and sue over ridiculous circumstances. Maybe it's because fast food restaurants are so abundant (and successful), but something about them acts as a magnet for those looking to scam some big cash. There don't appear to be any statistics for how many lawsuits are brought against fast food companies every year, but they certainly aren't a legal rarity.

Arguably the most well-known fast food lawsuit is the hot coffee McDonald's lawsuit of the 1990s. Stella Liebeck sued McDonald's after spilling hot coffee on herself and receiving third-degree burns. Her suit placed blame on McDonald's for making the coffee too hot and Liebeck walked away with an undisclosed amount of money (less than $600,000). Crooks and fraudsters around the nation instantly had dollar signs in their eyes.

From disagreements over napkins to wrong orders and contest crime rings, here are some of the worst offenders when it comes to fast food scams and hustles that totally failed.


People Who Tried To Scam Fast Food Restaurants And Failed

Americans have been accused of being too quick to sue. What might be more accurate is that some people are too quick to abuse the legal system and sue over ridiculous circumstances. Maybe it's because fast food restaurants are so abundant (and successful), but something about them acts as a magnet for those looking to scam some big cash. There don't appear to be any statistics for how many lawsuits are brought against fast food companies every year, but they certainly aren't a legal rarity.

Arguably the most well-known fast food lawsuit is the hot coffee McDonald's lawsuit of the 1990s. Stella Liebeck sued McDonald's after spilling hot coffee on herself and receiving third-degree burns. Her suit placed blame on McDonald's for making the coffee too hot and Liebeck walked away with an undisclosed amount of money (less than $600,000). Crooks and fraudsters around the nation instantly had dollar signs in their eyes.

From disagreements over napkins to wrong orders and contest crime rings, here are some of the worst offenders when it comes to fast food scams and hustles that totally failed.


People Who Tried To Scam Fast Food Restaurants And Failed

Americans have been accused of being too quick to sue. What might be more accurate is that some people are too quick to abuse the legal system and sue over ridiculous circumstances. Maybe it's because fast food restaurants are so abundant (and successful), but something about them acts as a magnet for those looking to scam some big cash. There don't appear to be any statistics for how many lawsuits are brought against fast food companies every year, but they certainly aren't a legal rarity.

Arguably the most well-known fast food lawsuit is the hot coffee McDonald's lawsuit of the 1990s. Stella Liebeck sued McDonald's after spilling hot coffee on herself and receiving third-degree burns. Her suit placed blame on McDonald's for making the coffee too hot and Liebeck walked away with an undisclosed amount of money (less than $600,000). Crooks and fraudsters around the nation instantly had dollar signs in their eyes.

From disagreements over napkins to wrong orders and contest crime rings, here are some of the worst offenders when it comes to fast food scams and hustles that totally failed.


People Who Tried To Scam Fast Food Restaurants And Failed

Americans have been accused of being too quick to sue. What might be more accurate is that some people are too quick to abuse the legal system and sue over ridiculous circumstances. Maybe it's because fast food restaurants are so abundant (and successful), but something about them acts as a magnet for those looking to scam some big cash. There don't appear to be any statistics for how many lawsuits are brought against fast food companies every year, but they certainly aren't a legal rarity.

Arguably the most well-known fast food lawsuit is the hot coffee McDonald's lawsuit of the 1990s. Stella Liebeck sued McDonald's after spilling hot coffee on herself and receiving third-degree burns. Her suit placed blame on McDonald's for making the coffee too hot and Liebeck walked away with an undisclosed amount of money (less than $600,000). Crooks and fraudsters around the nation instantly had dollar signs in their eyes.

From disagreements over napkins to wrong orders and contest crime rings, here are some of the worst offenders when it comes to fast food scams and hustles that totally failed.


People Who Tried To Scam Fast Food Restaurants And Failed

Americans have been accused of being too quick to sue. What might be more accurate is that some people are too quick to abuse the legal system and sue over ridiculous circumstances. Maybe it's because fast food restaurants are so abundant (and successful), but something about them acts as a magnet for those looking to scam some big cash. There don't appear to be any statistics for how many lawsuits are brought against fast food companies every year, but they certainly aren't a legal rarity.

Arguably the most well-known fast food lawsuit is the hot coffee McDonald's lawsuit of the 1990s. Stella Liebeck sued McDonald's after spilling hot coffee on herself and receiving third-degree burns. Her suit placed blame on McDonald's for making the coffee too hot and Liebeck walked away with an undisclosed amount of money (less than $600,000). Crooks and fraudsters around the nation instantly had dollar signs in their eyes.

From disagreements over napkins to wrong orders and contest crime rings, here are some of the worst offenders when it comes to fast food scams and hustles that totally failed.


People Who Tried To Scam Fast Food Restaurants And Failed

Americans have been accused of being too quick to sue. What might be more accurate is that some people are too quick to abuse the legal system and sue over ridiculous circumstances. Maybe it's because fast food restaurants are so abundant (and successful), but something about them acts as a magnet for those looking to scam some big cash. There don't appear to be any statistics for how many lawsuits are brought against fast food companies every year, but they certainly aren't a legal rarity.

Arguably the most well-known fast food lawsuit is the hot coffee McDonald's lawsuit of the 1990s. Stella Liebeck sued McDonald's after spilling hot coffee on herself and receiving third-degree burns. Her suit placed blame on McDonald's for making the coffee too hot and Liebeck walked away with an undisclosed amount of money (less than $600,000). Crooks and fraudsters around the nation instantly had dollar signs in their eyes.

From disagreements over napkins to wrong orders and contest crime rings, here are some of the worst offenders when it comes to fast food scams and hustles that totally failed.


People Who Tried To Scam Fast Food Restaurants And Failed

Americans have been accused of being too quick to sue. What might be more accurate is that some people are too quick to abuse the legal system and sue over ridiculous circumstances. Maybe it's because fast food restaurants are so abundant (and successful), but something about them acts as a magnet for those looking to scam some big cash. There don't appear to be any statistics for how many lawsuits are brought against fast food companies every year, but they certainly aren't a legal rarity.

Arguably the most well-known fast food lawsuit is the hot coffee McDonald's lawsuit of the 1990s. Stella Liebeck sued McDonald's after spilling hot coffee on herself and receiving third-degree burns. Her suit placed blame on McDonald's for making the coffee too hot and Liebeck walked away with an undisclosed amount of money (less than $600,000). Crooks and fraudsters around the nation instantly had dollar signs in their eyes.

From disagreements over napkins to wrong orders and contest crime rings, here are some of the worst offenders when it comes to fast food scams and hustles that totally failed.


Watch the video: Fast Food VS Σπιτικό: Κλαμπ σάντουιτς Club sandwich. Miss Madden (December 2021).