Traditional recipes

Chiacchiere

Chiacchiere

Sift flour on the worktop, add eggs, sugar, butter at room temperature, cut into pieces, salt powder and a glass of aromatic liqueur, add the ingredients well. We must obtain a homogeneous and consistent paste. Let it rest for about an hour.

After the dough has rested, spread it with the rolling pin on the floured work surface, the sheet must be spread evenly and thinly. With the lacy wheel for sweets we cut strips 4 centimeters wide and 5 centimeters long.

Fry them in a pan with hot oil. Chiacciere must be well browned, after they are browned we place them on a tray covered with kitchen towels to absorb the oil and powder them abundantly with powdered sugar.

I apologize for forgetting to take photos of the way I work.



Dry or candy? How about… lies?

Corkscrews, lies, ears, candies, droughts - whatever you call them, these donuts with such cute names made the childhood of many of us much more beautiful.

In our country, my grandmother used to make them almost every Sunday, and then, when I grew up and came to visit her or on vacation, she would immediately get to work, knead the dough and make some brushwood as only she knew how to do. I only heard the name "dry" in the area where I grew up, the "lies" I think would fit best, because few would imagine that a dough without yeast can grow so beautiful when baked - practically, just like donuts. The name "lies" is, in fact, the best known - if you tell someone "how I miss some dryness like my grandmother used to do", immediately follows the statement "that is, the lies" - simply because it is the best known. For me it is somewhat confusing, from the recipes read on the internet the lies are, in fact, still leavened donuts, only they have a different shape. That is, this bizarre shape - hence another name, "ears", because they look like ears. I would say elves!

In the same county where I grew up, Mureș, only a few kilometers from my grandmother's village, the same donuts are called ashberry. I didn't understand why and I couldn't find anyone to explain it to me - probably because of the resemblance to the fruit of the same name. They are called Banat cirighele and they were made at the Banat prayers, by Farsang - they were prepared by Hungarians, Swabians, Slovaks and Romanians alike.

Looking more for the origin of these simple donuts - but so beloved! - I discovered an article in which the author lamented the fact that “few refer to the original Greek recipe, from the Peloponnese, Crete or Mykonos - places from which, apparently, they left at the beginning of the 17th century to the south of Russia. In Greece we find them under the names of Diples, Thiples, respectively Xerotigana kritis. The difference between Slavic and Greek recipes is that these thin strips of dough, fried in oil and crispy enough, do not powder at the end, but are introduced hot in honey and covered with ground walnuts. And in the case of these donuts, in fact, a rule of gastronomy is observed: a recipe arrives in political or cultural ways in a region other than the origin, and the local cuisine replaces ingredients with some handy, cheaper or easier to procure during preparation. : sugar instead of honey, for example. In Russia, Ukraine and Uzbekistan, the same lies are known as kvorost, verguny, and chak-chak, respectively. Poles and Ukrainians have mastered the same dish as a national recipe, for moments of religious or festive holidays, such as weddings: ‘Chrusciki’. In fact, the Poles also made them known to the Americans, and in Italy the cherries came under the names of Chiacchiere, Frappe, Cerici and are a favorite dessert next to coffee with milk.

As you can see, the cherries are very well known, and their recipe has been adapted according to the area - some recipes contain baking powder, others a lot of sugar, in some no eggs are put at all… I have been making the recipe I know for years childhood, a recipe that I gladly share with you.

Let's see how they are done:

For starters I write that the weight is approximate, in the past no one weighed the ingredients, everything was done by eye and the units of measurement were the cup and the spoon. And since some dishes were made so often, housewives already knew what the consistency of the dough should be. I will try to explain the recipe in as much detail as possible so that you can do some honest lies too!

  • 500g flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons greasy cream
  • about 200ml of milk
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • rum essence
  • a pinch of salt
  • oil
  • powdered sugar

Sift the flour on the board on which we knead the dough. I hope you do not miss the flour sieve in the house, because it has a very important role in doughs not only to separate the flour from other impurities, but also to obtain an airy and fluffy dough.

Rub the eggs well with the sugar and add the rum essence and cream. The fatter the better, if you are from Transylvania I know you don't miss it from the fridge :)

Make a hole in the flour, add the mixture of eggs and cream and baking soda in the milk. We add a little salt and quickly knead an elastic dough that comes off the fingers when it has a good consistency. If necessary, add more flour or skim milk.

Sprinkle flour on the board and spread a sheet of dough, not very thick because the lies will increase a lot when fried. Cut with a knife into the dough square or rectangular shapes. You choose the dimensions, I usually make them bigger - that means a side of 5-6 cm. Make a small cut in the middle of each square and pass a corner of the square through it, gently pull it out on the other side and pull it slightly giving it an elongated shape. Ready the first lie or lie in my case, do the same with the rest of the dough. Try to cut it in such a way as to use everything from the first, the dough does not spread a second time.

The lies are fried in an oil bath - so you need a larger diameter pan, which must be deep. A wok or a fryer, preferably.

Heat the oil and fry them on one side and on the other until they brown nicely. Then we take out the lies on a plate on which we put absorbent paper to reduce the excess oil.

We roll them well with powdered sugar (this is our children's favorite part) and serve them almost cold.

If they stay and no one gets upset the next day, they are just as fluffy! In fact, here's the lie test - it has to be the same the next day, if they're like biscuits you don't think about where you went wrong, you have to do a few more vailings of lies to "catch" the perfect recipe.

For daily recipe recommendations, you can also find me on the Facebook page, on Youtube, on Pinterest and on Instagram. I invite you to like, subscribe and follow. Also, the group Let's cook with Amalia is waiting for you for exchanges of recipes and experiences in the kitchen.


Spiral with pumpkin

Roast the pumpkin with the sugar until it softens a little (about a quarter of an hour), add the cinnamon, mix and transfer to a strainer to drain the leftover juice. We also help him, pressing him lightly. If it seems too watery, we can add a tablespoon or two of breadcrumbs.

While the hardened pumpkin cools, prepare the dough. Mix the flour with the dry yeast, add lukewarm water, egg, sugar, vinegar and start kneading. When it gets consistent, add the oil and salt. Knead until you get a smooth, smooth dough, which we leave a little to rest, like 10 minutes.

We divide it into 3 and from each we spread a thin sheet, on the well-floured worktop. Distribute the filling evenly on the middle of each sheet (we can sprinkle coarsely chopped walnuts), roll, tighten at the ends and place the rolls in the tray, lined with baking paper, in a spiral shape.
Grease the spiral with egg yolk diluted with a little milk and put in the oven, preheated to 180 degrees until it browns nicely.


Tuscan rags, chatter, Italian lies, crunchy

The Tuscan rags & ndash represents the dessert par excellence consumed during the carnival (the period that lasts, in the Gregorian calendar, from the feast of the Epiphany to Ash Wednesday, that is, the entrance to Lent) in all regions of the Italian peninsula.

I used the Tuscan term & bdquocenci & rdquo, which would mean & bdquocarpe & rdquo, & bdquobucati of fabric & rdquo by their resemblance to this simple but delicious dessert. It is a term that we find in sec. XIII in the Florentine lexicon, but next to this name we find many others, related to the region of affiliation: lies, chatter, crust, gallant (of Spanish origin), frappa (of French origin), crespelle or sprelle (of Latin origin & ldquo crispus & rdquo), bows, wonders, intrigues and so on All this proves the distant origin in the history of the culinary culture of this dessert. We are talking about the Roman period (& bdquofrictilia & rdquoera a refined product, fried in lard).
There are also several versions of this dessert, produced and distributed now both industrially and artisanal. The recipe that I will present to you is an old one, as the housewives used to prepare it, in the Siena area. I received it through the kindness of some elderly inhabitants of those parts, puzzled by my interest in their culinary specialties, and whom I thank in this way as well.

Ingredient:

  • flour 500 g
  • oua 3
  • sugar 130 g
  • a grated lemon peel
  • a grated orange peel
  • & frac12 glass of dry white wine
  • 10 g baking powder
  • acacia honey (to taste)

Method of preparation:
Mix all the ingredients and knead for about 14 hours.

Leave it to rest in the fridge for 1/2 hour and then spread a sheet of maximum 5 mm thick. Depending on your preferences, we can leave it at 5 mm, but we can also extend it to 2 mm. We can give up baking powder (in this case the sheet must be left as thin as possible). Cut with a knife 3 cm wide and 6 cm long strips. And here we can give free rein to our own imagination: rectangular, rhombus, bow tie strips, etc.

Fry in hot oil at about 160-170 & deg (I prefer the peanut oil due to its high boiling temperature) and when they are browned on both sides remove with a spoon, let the excess oil drain (by horizontal and not vertical movements, as in this case all the oil is soaked in the dough), and we place them on a plate lined with absorbent paper.

There is another way to make these & ldquo chiacchiere & rdquo: after they have been previously fried, they are put in the oven for a few minutes. My recipe only provides for their frying.
Serve sprinkled with vanilla sugar but especially (and believe me, they are great) with honey.

The recipe and the pictures belong to him Innocent L Chania, guest post pe Good appetite blog with Gina Bradea!

More traditional Italian recipes from Innocent L Canea see here & ndash click where it is written in red.


Tuscan rags, chatter, Italian lies, crunchy

The Tuscan rags & ndash represents the dessert par excellence consumed during the carnival (the period that lasts, in the Gregorian calendar, from the feast of the Epiphany to Ash Wednesday, that is, the entrance to Lent) in all regions of the Italian peninsula.

I used the Tuscan term & bdquocenci & rdquo, which would mean & bdquocarpe & rdquo, & bdquobucati of fabric & rdquo by their resemblance to this simple but delicious dessert. It is a term that we find in sec. XIII in the Florentine lexicon, but next to this name we find many others, related to the region of affiliation: lies, chatter, crust, gallant (of Spanish origin), frappa (of French origin), crespelle or sprelle (of Latin origin & ldquo crispus & rdquo), bows, wonders, intrigues and so on All this proves the distant origin in the history of the culinary culture of this dessert. We are talking about the Roman period (& bdquofrictilia & rdquoera a refined product, fried in lard).
There are also several versions of this dessert, produced and distributed now both industrially and artisanal. The recipe that I will present to you is an old one, as the housewives used to prepare it, in the Siena area. I received it through the kindness of some elderly inhabitants of those parts, puzzled by my interest in their culinary specialties, and whom I thank in this way as well.

Ingredient:

  • flour 500 g
  • oua 3
  • sugar 130 g
  • a grated lemon peel
  • a grated orange peel
  • & frac12 glass of dry white wine
  • 10 g baking powder
  • acacia honey (to taste)

Method of preparation:
Mix all the ingredients and knead for about 14 hours.

Leave it to rest in the fridge for 1/2 hour and then spread a sheet of maximum 5 mm thick. Depending on your preferences, we can leave it at 5 mm, but we can also extend it to 2 mm. We can give up baking powder (in this case the sheet must be left as thin as possible). Cut with a knife 3 cm wide and 6 cm long strips. And here we can give free rein to our own imagination: rectangular, rhombus, bow tie strips, etc.

Fry in hot oil at about 160-170 & deg (I prefer the peanut oil due to its high boiling temperature) and when they are browned on both sides remove with a spoon, let the excess oil drain (by horizontal and not vertical movements, as in this case all the oil is soaked in the dough), and we place them on a plate lined with absorbent paper.

There is another way to make these & ldquo chiacchiere & rdquo: after they have been previously fried, they are put in the oven for a few minutes. My recipe only provides for their frying.
They are served sprinkled with vanilla sugar but especially (and believe me, they are great) with honey.

The recipe and the pictures belong to him Innocent L Chania, guest post pe Good appetite blog with Gina Bradea!

More traditional Italian recipes from Innocent L Canea see here & ndash click where it is written in red.


Chat about gluten free carnival

Long live Carnival! A party to which we are grateful for the delicacies it offers us, directly from Italian tradition , which we like to enjoy in the company among masks and confetti. What if there is someone in the company who is gluten intolerant? Don't worry, here's the recipe for gluten free chat . Also suitable for celiacs and very good for everyone.

Very easy to prepare, toast or bake, gluten-free chat will not make you regret the traditional ones. Just get it special gluten-free flour at the supermarket, in short, the right one for those suffering from celiac disease. Why deprive yourself of one of the most famous and beloved sweets of Carnival? And if you are looking for other gluten-free recipes, you can find them here: we have thought of a category just for you. From vegetable soup to falafel, from risotto with peppers to poppy seeds and apple pie. And many other delicious recipes are on the way.


Nico's agenda

It is true when you say "every world is a country". Carnival fried cakes such as gossip (rags, lies, crusts, rags, galani, pampuglie, cioffe, flakes ... etc) are also made in Romania, despite the fact that Carnival is not celebrated. The only difference ..they can be done all year round.
As in Italy, these desserts are called in many different ways as minciunele (in Romanian it means small lies), uscatele, scovergi, ciurigai. and who knows what other name.
In my house we always called them scovergi.
The basic recipe is always that. flour, eggs, butter, sugar. I found a variant with yogurt on the Romanian cooking forum Retete culinare. They came really good. so good. that my neighbor Lydia said she wants the recipe too, after tasting it. If you want to try them too, here is the recipe:

Mix in a bowl the egg, sugar, a pinch of salt, yogurt, vanilla, grated lemon zest and melted and cooled butter. At the end, add enough flour to have a smooth and elastic dough. Knead for about 10-15 minutes, give it the shape of a ball and let it rest wrapped in a cloth for at least 30 minutes.
Then flatten the dough so as to obtain a fairly thin pastry about 2-3 mm thick. and with a scalloped cut wheel, make strips or rectangles, rhombuses of 8-10 cm by 4 cm (or the size you want), and make a cut on each of them, without reaching the ends. Pass one of the ends inside the cut and pull (see photo). I preferred to do them this way but you can make two central and parallel cuts on each of them for the length. Immerse the strips in hot but not boiling oil and fry until golden, turning the strips in the oil. Drain them on paper towels. When they become almost cold, sprinkle them with vanilla icing sugar.

In Italy, during Carnival, especially fried sweets are made. as well as lies or scovergile at Romanians or various donuts. As in Romania, these sweets have different names (depending on the region). chatter, slaps, lies, crusts, rags, galani, pampuglie, cioffe, flakes..etc
The basic recipe is also with eggs, sugar, flour, butter to which is added an alcoholic drink like tuica called grappa. The shape is similar to scovergile or slightly diverse, a rectangle with two parallel cuts in the middle. This recipe is with yogurt, I took it from the Culinary Recipes forum (made by Alina) and I really liked it.


Chat about gluten free carnival

Long live Carnival! A party to which we are grateful for the delicacies it offers us, directly from Italian tradition , which we like to enjoy in the company among masks and confetti. What if there is someone in the company who is gluten intolerant? Don't worry, here's the recipe for gluten free chat . Also suitable for celiacs and very good for everyone.

Very easy to prepare, toast or bake, gluten-free chat will not make you regret the traditional ones. Just get it special gluten-free flour at the supermarket, in short, the right one for those suffering from celiac disease. Why deprive yourself of one of the most famous and beloved sweets of Carnival? And if you are looking for other gluten-free recipes, you can find them here: we have thought of a category just for you. From vegetable soup to falafel, from risotto with peppers to poppy seeds and apple pie. And many other delicious recipes are on the way.


What you eat on New Year's Eve can influence you all year round. Here are the New Year's culinary traditions around the world

The transition to the new year is full of superstitions and customs all over the world. On the holiday tables are placed dishes with special meanings, which will bring luck, health and wealth.

We don't miss the steak and meatball made of pork. Poultry is avoided because it is said to drive away luck, but dishes from various grains (beans, peas) are welcome because popular tradition says it means a lot of money for next year. Almost everywhere in the world there is a glass of champagne at midnight, but every people has its own culinary traditions related to New Year's meals.

Spain: 12 grapes

Tradition says that at midnight the Spaniards have to eat 12 grapes for the wishes they make for each month of the New Year. A sweet grape means a good month, and a sour grape means a month with more weight.

Italy: lentils and pork

Even Italian fans of light, Mediterranean diets put pork steak on the New Year's table, which I think will bring them prosperity in the New Year. In addition, there is a dish called cotechino with lentils & ndash a stew with lentils and sausages - which I say brings them luck.

Japan: colorful menus

No New Year's menu is more colorful than the Japanese. The traditional food is called osechi and includes several boxes of goodies. Every dish nicely placed in these containers symbolizes something. For example, kazunoko - a roll of herring, means the desire to have children next year, kuro-mothers & ndash black soy means the desire for health, while konbu & ndash a kind of seaweed symbolizes joy.

Germany: marzipan piglets

In both Germany and Austria, pork is the main dish during this period, because a high-fat meat symbolizes well-being and abundance. So the piglets became a symbol of the New Year. You will even find them in the form of marzipan figurines used as decorations on the New Year's table.

Also in Germany, it is customary to leave a little of each dish tasted at the New Year's table on the plate at midnight. It is said that this will bring you abundance in the house next year.

Denmark: marzipan cakes and broken plates

At midnight, Danes usually eat a cake made with marzipan called Kransekage. A less common habit is breaking plates on the doors of neighbors and friends. Tradition says that if you find shards on the doorstep, you are lucky for the next year.

Philippines: round fruits

Here tradition says that round shapes bring luck and prosperity. So on holiday tables you will always find fruits with this shape: oranges, melons, papaya.

Lucky sweets

There are few who do not taste something sweet at the holiday meals. Most peoples have traditions related to these as well: In Italy some donuts called are prepared Chiacchiere, with a lot of honey. New Year's donuts are also eaten in the Netherlands. Are called ollie bollen and they have fillings with apples, raisins and currants.

In Greece, the first day of the year is dedicated to Saint Basil and the cake that the Greeks make on this day is named in honor of Saint Vassilopita. A silver or gold coin is hidden in it every time. It is said that whoever finds it will be lucky all year round.

And in Mexico there is the custom of hiding small surprises in the so-called New Year's cake thread of kings. In Sweden and Norway, a rice pudding is prepared that has a hazelnut hidden inside it that will bring good luck to those who find it.

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