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New Study Suggests Too Much Gluten May Cause Celiac Disease in Babies

New Study Suggests Too Much Gluten May Cause Celiac Disease in Babies

Findings contradict previous studies linking celiac disease to the age at which babies were introduced to gluten

Further findings on the significance of diet will allow doctors to make more personalized recommendations rather than just general dietary guidelines.

A series of studies, known as the TEDDY project (The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young), collects data from children with a genetic risk of celiac disease. A recent TEDDY study in Sweden found that children who ate more than 5 grams of gluten per day “were more than twice as likely to develop celiac disease than those who ate less,” Food Navigator reported.

Despite the popularly held belief that introducing gluten before 17 weeks or after 26 weeks is linked to the development of celiac disease, the TEDDY study found no such link. Collected data has also debunked a theory that breastfeeding at optimal durations lowers the risk for celiac disease.

“Our findings indicate that the amount of gluten triggers the disease,” Carin Andrén Aronsson, study unit manager from Lund University, said. “These findings may be taken into account for future infant feeding recommendations.”

Further studies on the subject matter and more precisely determining the significance of diet on developing celiac disease will allow doctors to make more personalized recommendations rather than general dietary guidelines.


Defeat Deficiency: What Nutrients are Lacking in the Gluten-Free Diet?

The glow has dimmed on the gluten-free halo. The diet is no panacea, no formula for peak performance.

“A gluten-free cookie or a brownie is no more nutritious than a regular brownie or cookie or cake made with gluten,” says Shelley Case, RD, of Calgary, Canada, author of Gluten Free: The Definitive Resource Guide. “There’s nothing magical about going gluten free.”

However, for people with celiac disease, it is the only treatment available. Having removed all sources of gluten from their diet, they must also achieve good nutrition. As with any diet, convenience foods may not be the healthiest choices.

“Every time you go on a restrictive diet, there is a risk for nutritional deficiency,” says Jocelyn Silvester, MD, instructor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “While treating celiac disease helps you absorb nutrients better, it might also put you at risk for not absorbing the right profile of nutrients.”

Medical literature contains little data about long-term nutrition of patients on a gluten-free diet. The Manitoba celiac cohort study is following a group two years after diagnosis to see how treatment affects their nutrition. Silvester, who completed her residency training at University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, maintains ties with this research. She hopes it will show whether patients normally achieve good nutrition or need more follow-up. So what’s lacking when it comes to nutrients in the gluten-free diet? Read on for more on missing nutrients and what steps to take when going gluten free.


Defeat Deficiency: What Nutrients are Lacking in the Gluten-Free Diet?

The glow has dimmed on the gluten-free halo. The diet is no panacea, no formula for peak performance.

“A gluten-free cookie or a brownie is no more nutritious than a regular brownie or cookie or cake made with gluten,” says Shelley Case, RD, of Calgary, Canada, author of Gluten Free: The Definitive Resource Guide. “There’s nothing magical about going gluten free.”

However, for people with celiac disease, it is the only treatment available. Having removed all sources of gluten from their diet, they must also achieve good nutrition. As with any diet, convenience foods may not be the healthiest choices.

“Every time you go on a restrictive diet, there is a risk for nutritional deficiency,” says Jocelyn Silvester, MD, instructor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “While treating celiac disease helps you absorb nutrients better, it might also put you at risk for not absorbing the right profile of nutrients.”

Medical literature contains little data about long-term nutrition of patients on a gluten-free diet. The Manitoba celiac cohort study is following a group two years after diagnosis to see how treatment affects their nutrition. Silvester, who completed her residency training at University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, maintains ties with this research. She hopes it will show whether patients normally achieve good nutrition or need more follow-up. So what’s lacking when it comes to nutrients in the gluten-free diet? Read on for more on missing nutrients and what steps to take when going gluten free.


Defeat Deficiency: What Nutrients are Lacking in the Gluten-Free Diet?

The glow has dimmed on the gluten-free halo. The diet is no panacea, no formula for peak performance.

“A gluten-free cookie or a brownie is no more nutritious than a regular brownie or cookie or cake made with gluten,” says Shelley Case, RD, of Calgary, Canada, author of Gluten Free: The Definitive Resource Guide. “There’s nothing magical about going gluten free.”

However, for people with celiac disease, it is the only treatment available. Having removed all sources of gluten from their diet, they must also achieve good nutrition. As with any diet, convenience foods may not be the healthiest choices.

“Every time you go on a restrictive diet, there is a risk for nutritional deficiency,” says Jocelyn Silvester, MD, instructor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “While treating celiac disease helps you absorb nutrients better, it might also put you at risk for not absorbing the right profile of nutrients.”

Medical literature contains little data about long-term nutrition of patients on a gluten-free diet. The Manitoba celiac cohort study is following a group two years after diagnosis to see how treatment affects their nutrition. Silvester, who completed her residency training at University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, maintains ties with this research. She hopes it will show whether patients normally achieve good nutrition or need more follow-up. So what’s lacking when it comes to nutrients in the gluten-free diet? Read on for more on missing nutrients and what steps to take when going gluten free.


Defeat Deficiency: What Nutrients are Lacking in the Gluten-Free Diet?

The glow has dimmed on the gluten-free halo. The diet is no panacea, no formula for peak performance.

“A gluten-free cookie or a brownie is no more nutritious than a regular brownie or cookie or cake made with gluten,” says Shelley Case, RD, of Calgary, Canada, author of Gluten Free: The Definitive Resource Guide. “There’s nothing magical about going gluten free.”

However, for people with celiac disease, it is the only treatment available. Having removed all sources of gluten from their diet, they must also achieve good nutrition. As with any diet, convenience foods may not be the healthiest choices.

“Every time you go on a restrictive diet, there is a risk for nutritional deficiency,” says Jocelyn Silvester, MD, instructor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “While treating celiac disease helps you absorb nutrients better, it might also put you at risk for not absorbing the right profile of nutrients.”

Medical literature contains little data about long-term nutrition of patients on a gluten-free diet. The Manitoba celiac cohort study is following a group two years after diagnosis to see how treatment affects their nutrition. Silvester, who completed her residency training at University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, maintains ties with this research. She hopes it will show whether patients normally achieve good nutrition or need more follow-up. So what’s lacking when it comes to nutrients in the gluten-free diet? Read on for more on missing nutrients and what steps to take when going gluten free.


Defeat Deficiency: What Nutrients are Lacking in the Gluten-Free Diet?

The glow has dimmed on the gluten-free halo. The diet is no panacea, no formula for peak performance.

“A gluten-free cookie or a brownie is no more nutritious than a regular brownie or cookie or cake made with gluten,” says Shelley Case, RD, of Calgary, Canada, author of Gluten Free: The Definitive Resource Guide. “There’s nothing magical about going gluten free.”

However, for people with celiac disease, it is the only treatment available. Having removed all sources of gluten from their diet, they must also achieve good nutrition. As with any diet, convenience foods may not be the healthiest choices.

“Every time you go on a restrictive diet, there is a risk for nutritional deficiency,” says Jocelyn Silvester, MD, instructor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “While treating celiac disease helps you absorb nutrients better, it might also put you at risk for not absorbing the right profile of nutrients.”

Medical literature contains little data about long-term nutrition of patients on a gluten-free diet. The Manitoba celiac cohort study is following a group two years after diagnosis to see how treatment affects their nutrition. Silvester, who completed her residency training at University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, maintains ties with this research. She hopes it will show whether patients normally achieve good nutrition or need more follow-up. So what’s lacking when it comes to nutrients in the gluten-free diet? Read on for more on missing nutrients and what steps to take when going gluten free.


Defeat Deficiency: What Nutrients are Lacking in the Gluten-Free Diet?

The glow has dimmed on the gluten-free halo. The diet is no panacea, no formula for peak performance.

“A gluten-free cookie or a brownie is no more nutritious than a regular brownie or cookie or cake made with gluten,” says Shelley Case, RD, of Calgary, Canada, author of Gluten Free: The Definitive Resource Guide. “There’s nothing magical about going gluten free.”

However, for people with celiac disease, it is the only treatment available. Having removed all sources of gluten from their diet, they must also achieve good nutrition. As with any diet, convenience foods may not be the healthiest choices.

“Every time you go on a restrictive diet, there is a risk for nutritional deficiency,” says Jocelyn Silvester, MD, instructor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “While treating celiac disease helps you absorb nutrients better, it might also put you at risk for not absorbing the right profile of nutrients.”

Medical literature contains little data about long-term nutrition of patients on a gluten-free diet. The Manitoba celiac cohort study is following a group two years after diagnosis to see how treatment affects their nutrition. Silvester, who completed her residency training at University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, maintains ties with this research. She hopes it will show whether patients normally achieve good nutrition or need more follow-up. So what’s lacking when it comes to nutrients in the gluten-free diet? Read on for more on missing nutrients and what steps to take when going gluten free.


Defeat Deficiency: What Nutrients are Lacking in the Gluten-Free Diet?

The glow has dimmed on the gluten-free halo. The diet is no panacea, no formula for peak performance.

“A gluten-free cookie or a brownie is no more nutritious than a regular brownie or cookie or cake made with gluten,” says Shelley Case, RD, of Calgary, Canada, author of Gluten Free: The Definitive Resource Guide. “There’s nothing magical about going gluten free.”

However, for people with celiac disease, it is the only treatment available. Having removed all sources of gluten from their diet, they must also achieve good nutrition. As with any diet, convenience foods may not be the healthiest choices.

“Every time you go on a restrictive diet, there is a risk for nutritional deficiency,” says Jocelyn Silvester, MD, instructor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “While treating celiac disease helps you absorb nutrients better, it might also put you at risk for not absorbing the right profile of nutrients.”

Medical literature contains little data about long-term nutrition of patients on a gluten-free diet. The Manitoba celiac cohort study is following a group two years after diagnosis to see how treatment affects their nutrition. Silvester, who completed her residency training at University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, maintains ties with this research. She hopes it will show whether patients normally achieve good nutrition or need more follow-up. So what’s lacking when it comes to nutrients in the gluten-free diet? Read on for more on missing nutrients and what steps to take when going gluten free.


Defeat Deficiency: What Nutrients are Lacking in the Gluten-Free Diet?

The glow has dimmed on the gluten-free halo. The diet is no panacea, no formula for peak performance.

“A gluten-free cookie or a brownie is no more nutritious than a regular brownie or cookie or cake made with gluten,” says Shelley Case, RD, of Calgary, Canada, author of Gluten Free: The Definitive Resource Guide. “There’s nothing magical about going gluten free.”

However, for people with celiac disease, it is the only treatment available. Having removed all sources of gluten from their diet, they must also achieve good nutrition. As with any diet, convenience foods may not be the healthiest choices.

“Every time you go on a restrictive diet, there is a risk for nutritional deficiency,” says Jocelyn Silvester, MD, instructor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “While treating celiac disease helps you absorb nutrients better, it might also put you at risk for not absorbing the right profile of nutrients.”

Medical literature contains little data about long-term nutrition of patients on a gluten-free diet. The Manitoba celiac cohort study is following a group two years after diagnosis to see how treatment affects their nutrition. Silvester, who completed her residency training at University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, maintains ties with this research. She hopes it will show whether patients normally achieve good nutrition or need more follow-up. So what’s lacking when it comes to nutrients in the gluten-free diet? Read on for more on missing nutrients and what steps to take when going gluten free.


Defeat Deficiency: What Nutrients are Lacking in the Gluten-Free Diet?

The glow has dimmed on the gluten-free halo. The diet is no panacea, no formula for peak performance.

“A gluten-free cookie or a brownie is no more nutritious than a regular brownie or cookie or cake made with gluten,” says Shelley Case, RD, of Calgary, Canada, author of Gluten Free: The Definitive Resource Guide. “There’s nothing magical about going gluten free.”

However, for people with celiac disease, it is the only treatment available. Having removed all sources of gluten from their diet, they must also achieve good nutrition. As with any diet, convenience foods may not be the healthiest choices.

“Every time you go on a restrictive diet, there is a risk for nutritional deficiency,” says Jocelyn Silvester, MD, instructor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “While treating celiac disease helps you absorb nutrients better, it might also put you at risk for not absorbing the right profile of nutrients.”

Medical literature contains little data about long-term nutrition of patients on a gluten-free diet. The Manitoba celiac cohort study is following a group two years after diagnosis to see how treatment affects their nutrition. Silvester, who completed her residency training at University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, maintains ties with this research. She hopes it will show whether patients normally achieve good nutrition or need more follow-up. So what’s lacking when it comes to nutrients in the gluten-free diet? Read on for more on missing nutrients and what steps to take when going gluten free.


Defeat Deficiency: What Nutrients are Lacking in the Gluten-Free Diet?

The glow has dimmed on the gluten-free halo. The diet is no panacea, no formula for peak performance.

“A gluten-free cookie or a brownie is no more nutritious than a regular brownie or cookie or cake made with gluten,” says Shelley Case, RD, of Calgary, Canada, author of Gluten Free: The Definitive Resource Guide. “There’s nothing magical about going gluten free.”

However, for people with celiac disease, it is the only treatment available. Having removed all sources of gluten from their diet, they must also achieve good nutrition. As with any diet, convenience foods may not be the healthiest choices.

“Every time you go on a restrictive diet, there is a risk for nutritional deficiency,” says Jocelyn Silvester, MD, instructor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “While treating celiac disease helps you absorb nutrients better, it might also put you at risk for not absorbing the right profile of nutrients.”

Medical literature contains little data about long-term nutrition of patients on a gluten-free diet. The Manitoba celiac cohort study is following a group two years after diagnosis to see how treatment affects their nutrition. Silvester, who completed her residency training at University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, maintains ties with this research. She hopes it will show whether patients normally achieve good nutrition or need more follow-up. So what’s lacking when it comes to nutrients in the gluten-free diet? Read on for more on missing nutrients and what steps to take when going gluten free.