Traditional recipes

The Dirty Dirty

The Dirty Dirty

When you walk into Dirty Martin’s on 28th and Guadalupe, you are comforted by the sight of a simple lunch counter, inviting booths and the hum of the open kitchen. Either take a seat inside and soak in the liveliness of the kitchen, or relax outside on the patio on a sunny day, beer and burger in hand. Regardless, you’re going to have a good time and an even better meal. You will find yourself mesmerized by the smell of their classic burgers or the sizzle of Dirty’s chicken-fried steak.

Photo by Kathleen Lee

Although its menu is extensive, staples at this joint include Texas favorites like fried pickles and Frito pie as appetizers. Burgers are Dirty’s bread and butter, even more true considering Dirty’s buns are generously buttered. Favorite burgers include the OT Special, a double-meat and bacon cheeseburger and the Chili Cheeseburger. The chicken-fried steak sandwich is a concept Dirty’s has perfected as well.

Upon arrival, our photographer Kathleen and I had to make some difficult choices. To start, we decided to split the fried pickles. Dirty’s makes fried pickles in the form of thin discs as opposed to spears. The discs allow for a crispy and crunchy fried pickle without the common sogginess problem of the spears, and are a perfect balance of salty and savory.

Photo by Kathleen Lee

To really quench our appetites, each of us ordered one of the most prime burgers in Austin. When the classic cheeseburger (topped with a fried egg) and the OT Special arrived at our patio table, it was hard to resist taking a bite before first taking a picture for this article. Arriving in perfect form– complete with cheese pouring over the patties, and buns glistening with butter– we tried to pace ourselves and appreciate the truly perfected art of our burgers. I went face first into my juicy, savory and exquisitely crafted burger behemoth. The last thing I remember is the pleasant crunch of the bacon and the moisture of the burger juice on my beard as I went into burger blackout.

Photo by Kathleen Lee

Photo by Kathleen Lee

Unfortunately, it all came to an end and I’ll have to wait until next time for burger ecstasy. For those of you who enjoy the simplicity of the perfect burger, try out Dirty Martin’s and experience the joy for yourself.

Location: 2808 Guadalupe St, Austin, TX 78705
Hours of operation: Mon-Sun: 11am-11pm

The post The Dirty Dirty originally appeared on Spoon University. Please visit Spoon University to see more posts like this one.


How to Make a Dirty Martini

When the craving for salt and olive brine hits, dirtier is better.

  1. Combine the gin, vermouth, and olive juice in a mixing tin with ice. Stir well.
  2. Strain into a chilled martini glass.
  3. Garnish with as many olives as you'd like on a toothpick.

If you want more olive juice, add more olive juice. There's no reason to set limitations on yourself.

The Dirty Martini used to be the punching bag of cocktails. You can see why. A classic Martini is an orchestral composition, demanding finely tuned finesse from its maker. A Dirty Martini is "Smoke on the Water" in Guitar Hero by comparison. You might've gotten an eyeroll at the bar for ordering it. There might've been whisperings about "wasting good vermouth." And sure, it's not like the Dirty Martini has suddenly become the golden child of drinks. But there is a certain amount of new respect for a person who knows what they're about, and if what they're about is a Dirty Martini, so be it.

A Dirty Martini doesn't just take guts to order, but to drink, as well. Boldly briny and salty as the sea, it's disgustingly good, with that cloudy swirl of olive juice attacking your taste buds. But when you want a Dirty Martini, you want a Dirty Martini. It's like craving a can of salt and vinegar Pringles. Nothing will do until you've got them. If that craving has just walloped you, here's how to make a Dirty Martini. You can use vodka instead of gin if you prefer. Just don't skimp on the olives.

A Little Background

The Dirty Martini enjoys a rich history of being utterly despised by bartenders. But among its champions was FDR, who famously&mdashand sloppily&mdashmade his own cocktails almost every day, and who is credited for popularizing this briny Martini offshoot. (Our 32nd president also had the honor of ending Prohibition in 1933.) Punch pegs the rise of the Dirty Martini to post-WWII America, although it was invented before, and says FDR's version called for two parts gin, one part vermouth, and a teaspoon of olive brine. According to some reports, FDR served a dry Martini to Joseph Stalin at the Tehran Conference in 1943, which Stalin unenthusiastically reviewed as "cold on the stomach." Perhaps he'd have preferred it dirty.

These days, bartenders are coming around to the Dirty Martini if drinkers insist upon ordering it, it might as well be good. As such, craft variations and ingredients have sprung up in recent years, like olive bitters, caperberries for garnish, and brine specially bottled for use in cocktails. The Dirty Martini is cleaning up its act, so to speak.

If You Like This, Try These

Too dirty for you? A classic gin Martini punches up the gin and holds the juice. You can garnish it with three olives, or a lemon twist for a hint of citrus, or cocktail onions (that's called a Gibson). And then you get into the Martini variations. There's a Vesper, like James Bond drank, with a perplexing recipe that calls for gin, vodka, and Lillet. (Don't shake!) A Tuxedo has gin, sherry, and orange bitters. And there's always the option of swapping your gin for vodka.

However, if you're just here for the salt and the brine, then it is high time you learned the art of the pickleback shot and the pickle juice cocktail.


How to Make a Dirty Martini

When the craving for salt and olive brine hits, dirtier is better.

  1. Combine the gin, vermouth, and olive juice in a mixing tin with ice. Stir well.
  2. Strain into a chilled martini glass.
  3. Garnish with as many olives as you'd like on a toothpick.

If you want more olive juice, add more olive juice. There's no reason to set limitations on yourself.

The Dirty Martini used to be the punching bag of cocktails. You can see why. A classic Martini is an orchestral composition, demanding finely tuned finesse from its maker. A Dirty Martini is "Smoke on the Water" in Guitar Hero by comparison. You might've gotten an eyeroll at the bar for ordering it. There might've been whisperings about "wasting good vermouth." And sure, it's not like the Dirty Martini has suddenly become the golden child of drinks. But there is a certain amount of new respect for a person who knows what they're about, and if what they're about is a Dirty Martini, so be it.

A Dirty Martini doesn't just take guts to order, but to drink, as well. Boldly briny and salty as the sea, it's disgustingly good, with that cloudy swirl of olive juice attacking your taste buds. But when you want a Dirty Martini, you want a Dirty Martini. It's like craving a can of salt and vinegar Pringles. Nothing will do until you've got them. If that craving has just walloped you, here's how to make a Dirty Martini. You can use vodka instead of gin if you prefer. Just don't skimp on the olives.

A Little Background

The Dirty Martini enjoys a rich history of being utterly despised by bartenders. But among its champions was FDR, who famously&mdashand sloppily&mdashmade his own cocktails almost every day, and who is credited for popularizing this briny Martini offshoot. (Our 32nd president also had the honor of ending Prohibition in 1933.) Punch pegs the rise of the Dirty Martini to post-WWII America, although it was invented before, and says FDR's version called for two parts gin, one part vermouth, and a teaspoon of olive brine. According to some reports, FDR served a dry Martini to Joseph Stalin at the Tehran Conference in 1943, which Stalin unenthusiastically reviewed as "cold on the stomach." Perhaps he'd have preferred it dirty.

These days, bartenders are coming around to the Dirty Martini if drinkers insist upon ordering it, it might as well be good. As such, craft variations and ingredients have sprung up in recent years, like olive bitters, caperberries for garnish, and brine specially bottled for use in cocktails. The Dirty Martini is cleaning up its act, so to speak.

If You Like This, Try These

Too dirty for you? A classic gin Martini punches up the gin and holds the juice. You can garnish it with three olives, or a lemon twist for a hint of citrus, or cocktail onions (that's called a Gibson). And then you get into the Martini variations. There's a Vesper, like James Bond drank, with a perplexing recipe that calls for gin, vodka, and Lillet. (Don't shake!) A Tuxedo has gin, sherry, and orange bitters. And there's always the option of swapping your gin for vodka.

However, if you're just here for the salt and the brine, then it is high time you learned the art of the pickleback shot and the pickle juice cocktail.


How to Make a Dirty Martini

When the craving for salt and olive brine hits, dirtier is better.

  1. Combine the gin, vermouth, and olive juice in a mixing tin with ice. Stir well.
  2. Strain into a chilled martini glass.
  3. Garnish with as many olives as you'd like on a toothpick.

If you want more olive juice, add more olive juice. There's no reason to set limitations on yourself.

The Dirty Martini used to be the punching bag of cocktails. You can see why. A classic Martini is an orchestral composition, demanding finely tuned finesse from its maker. A Dirty Martini is "Smoke on the Water" in Guitar Hero by comparison. You might've gotten an eyeroll at the bar for ordering it. There might've been whisperings about "wasting good vermouth." And sure, it's not like the Dirty Martini has suddenly become the golden child of drinks. But there is a certain amount of new respect for a person who knows what they're about, and if what they're about is a Dirty Martini, so be it.

A Dirty Martini doesn't just take guts to order, but to drink, as well. Boldly briny and salty as the sea, it's disgustingly good, with that cloudy swirl of olive juice attacking your taste buds. But when you want a Dirty Martini, you want a Dirty Martini. It's like craving a can of salt and vinegar Pringles. Nothing will do until you've got them. If that craving has just walloped you, here's how to make a Dirty Martini. You can use vodka instead of gin if you prefer. Just don't skimp on the olives.

A Little Background

The Dirty Martini enjoys a rich history of being utterly despised by bartenders. But among its champions was FDR, who famously&mdashand sloppily&mdashmade his own cocktails almost every day, and who is credited for popularizing this briny Martini offshoot. (Our 32nd president also had the honor of ending Prohibition in 1933.) Punch pegs the rise of the Dirty Martini to post-WWII America, although it was invented before, and says FDR's version called for two parts gin, one part vermouth, and a teaspoon of olive brine. According to some reports, FDR served a dry Martini to Joseph Stalin at the Tehran Conference in 1943, which Stalin unenthusiastically reviewed as "cold on the stomach." Perhaps he'd have preferred it dirty.

These days, bartenders are coming around to the Dirty Martini if drinkers insist upon ordering it, it might as well be good. As such, craft variations and ingredients have sprung up in recent years, like olive bitters, caperberries for garnish, and brine specially bottled for use in cocktails. The Dirty Martini is cleaning up its act, so to speak.

If You Like This, Try These

Too dirty for you? A classic gin Martini punches up the gin and holds the juice. You can garnish it with three olives, or a lemon twist for a hint of citrus, or cocktail onions (that's called a Gibson). And then you get into the Martini variations. There's a Vesper, like James Bond drank, with a perplexing recipe that calls for gin, vodka, and Lillet. (Don't shake!) A Tuxedo has gin, sherry, and orange bitters. And there's always the option of swapping your gin for vodka.

However, if you're just here for the salt and the brine, then it is high time you learned the art of the pickleback shot and the pickle juice cocktail.


How to Make a Dirty Martini

When the craving for salt and olive brine hits, dirtier is better.

  1. Combine the gin, vermouth, and olive juice in a mixing tin with ice. Stir well.
  2. Strain into a chilled martini glass.
  3. Garnish with as many olives as you'd like on a toothpick.

If you want more olive juice, add more olive juice. There's no reason to set limitations on yourself.

The Dirty Martini used to be the punching bag of cocktails. You can see why. A classic Martini is an orchestral composition, demanding finely tuned finesse from its maker. A Dirty Martini is "Smoke on the Water" in Guitar Hero by comparison. You might've gotten an eyeroll at the bar for ordering it. There might've been whisperings about "wasting good vermouth." And sure, it's not like the Dirty Martini has suddenly become the golden child of drinks. But there is a certain amount of new respect for a person who knows what they're about, and if what they're about is a Dirty Martini, so be it.

A Dirty Martini doesn't just take guts to order, but to drink, as well. Boldly briny and salty as the sea, it's disgustingly good, with that cloudy swirl of olive juice attacking your taste buds. But when you want a Dirty Martini, you want a Dirty Martini. It's like craving a can of salt and vinegar Pringles. Nothing will do until you've got them. If that craving has just walloped you, here's how to make a Dirty Martini. You can use vodka instead of gin if you prefer. Just don't skimp on the olives.

A Little Background

The Dirty Martini enjoys a rich history of being utterly despised by bartenders. But among its champions was FDR, who famously&mdashand sloppily&mdashmade his own cocktails almost every day, and who is credited for popularizing this briny Martini offshoot. (Our 32nd president also had the honor of ending Prohibition in 1933.) Punch pegs the rise of the Dirty Martini to post-WWII America, although it was invented before, and says FDR's version called for two parts gin, one part vermouth, and a teaspoon of olive brine. According to some reports, FDR served a dry Martini to Joseph Stalin at the Tehran Conference in 1943, which Stalin unenthusiastically reviewed as "cold on the stomach." Perhaps he'd have preferred it dirty.

These days, bartenders are coming around to the Dirty Martini if drinkers insist upon ordering it, it might as well be good. As such, craft variations and ingredients have sprung up in recent years, like olive bitters, caperberries for garnish, and brine specially bottled for use in cocktails. The Dirty Martini is cleaning up its act, so to speak.

If You Like This, Try These

Too dirty for you? A classic gin Martini punches up the gin and holds the juice. You can garnish it with three olives, or a lemon twist for a hint of citrus, or cocktail onions (that's called a Gibson). And then you get into the Martini variations. There's a Vesper, like James Bond drank, with a perplexing recipe that calls for gin, vodka, and Lillet. (Don't shake!) A Tuxedo has gin, sherry, and orange bitters. And there's always the option of swapping your gin for vodka.

However, if you're just here for the salt and the brine, then it is high time you learned the art of the pickleback shot and the pickle juice cocktail.


How to Make a Dirty Martini

When the craving for salt and olive brine hits, dirtier is better.

  1. Combine the gin, vermouth, and olive juice in a mixing tin with ice. Stir well.
  2. Strain into a chilled martini glass.
  3. Garnish with as many olives as you'd like on a toothpick.

If you want more olive juice, add more olive juice. There's no reason to set limitations on yourself.

The Dirty Martini used to be the punching bag of cocktails. You can see why. A classic Martini is an orchestral composition, demanding finely tuned finesse from its maker. A Dirty Martini is "Smoke on the Water" in Guitar Hero by comparison. You might've gotten an eyeroll at the bar for ordering it. There might've been whisperings about "wasting good vermouth." And sure, it's not like the Dirty Martini has suddenly become the golden child of drinks. But there is a certain amount of new respect for a person who knows what they're about, and if what they're about is a Dirty Martini, so be it.

A Dirty Martini doesn't just take guts to order, but to drink, as well. Boldly briny and salty as the sea, it's disgustingly good, with that cloudy swirl of olive juice attacking your taste buds. But when you want a Dirty Martini, you want a Dirty Martini. It's like craving a can of salt and vinegar Pringles. Nothing will do until you've got them. If that craving has just walloped you, here's how to make a Dirty Martini. You can use vodka instead of gin if you prefer. Just don't skimp on the olives.

A Little Background

The Dirty Martini enjoys a rich history of being utterly despised by bartenders. But among its champions was FDR, who famously&mdashand sloppily&mdashmade his own cocktails almost every day, and who is credited for popularizing this briny Martini offshoot. (Our 32nd president also had the honor of ending Prohibition in 1933.) Punch pegs the rise of the Dirty Martini to post-WWII America, although it was invented before, and says FDR's version called for two parts gin, one part vermouth, and a teaspoon of olive brine. According to some reports, FDR served a dry Martini to Joseph Stalin at the Tehran Conference in 1943, which Stalin unenthusiastically reviewed as "cold on the stomach." Perhaps he'd have preferred it dirty.

These days, bartenders are coming around to the Dirty Martini if drinkers insist upon ordering it, it might as well be good. As such, craft variations and ingredients have sprung up in recent years, like olive bitters, caperberries for garnish, and brine specially bottled for use in cocktails. The Dirty Martini is cleaning up its act, so to speak.

If You Like This, Try These

Too dirty for you? A classic gin Martini punches up the gin and holds the juice. You can garnish it with three olives, or a lemon twist for a hint of citrus, or cocktail onions (that's called a Gibson). And then you get into the Martini variations. There's a Vesper, like James Bond drank, with a perplexing recipe that calls for gin, vodka, and Lillet. (Don't shake!) A Tuxedo has gin, sherry, and orange bitters. And there's always the option of swapping your gin for vodka.

However, if you're just here for the salt and the brine, then it is high time you learned the art of the pickleback shot and the pickle juice cocktail.


How to Make a Dirty Martini

When the craving for salt and olive brine hits, dirtier is better.

  1. Combine the gin, vermouth, and olive juice in a mixing tin with ice. Stir well.
  2. Strain into a chilled martini glass.
  3. Garnish with as many olives as you'd like on a toothpick.

If you want more olive juice, add more olive juice. There's no reason to set limitations on yourself.

The Dirty Martini used to be the punching bag of cocktails. You can see why. A classic Martini is an orchestral composition, demanding finely tuned finesse from its maker. A Dirty Martini is "Smoke on the Water" in Guitar Hero by comparison. You might've gotten an eyeroll at the bar for ordering it. There might've been whisperings about "wasting good vermouth." And sure, it's not like the Dirty Martini has suddenly become the golden child of drinks. But there is a certain amount of new respect for a person who knows what they're about, and if what they're about is a Dirty Martini, so be it.

A Dirty Martini doesn't just take guts to order, but to drink, as well. Boldly briny and salty as the sea, it's disgustingly good, with that cloudy swirl of olive juice attacking your taste buds. But when you want a Dirty Martini, you want a Dirty Martini. It's like craving a can of salt and vinegar Pringles. Nothing will do until you've got them. If that craving has just walloped you, here's how to make a Dirty Martini. You can use vodka instead of gin if you prefer. Just don't skimp on the olives.

A Little Background

The Dirty Martini enjoys a rich history of being utterly despised by bartenders. But among its champions was FDR, who famously&mdashand sloppily&mdashmade his own cocktails almost every day, and who is credited for popularizing this briny Martini offshoot. (Our 32nd president also had the honor of ending Prohibition in 1933.) Punch pegs the rise of the Dirty Martini to post-WWII America, although it was invented before, and says FDR's version called for two parts gin, one part vermouth, and a teaspoon of olive brine. According to some reports, FDR served a dry Martini to Joseph Stalin at the Tehran Conference in 1943, which Stalin unenthusiastically reviewed as "cold on the stomach." Perhaps he'd have preferred it dirty.

These days, bartenders are coming around to the Dirty Martini if drinkers insist upon ordering it, it might as well be good. As such, craft variations and ingredients have sprung up in recent years, like olive bitters, caperberries for garnish, and brine specially bottled for use in cocktails. The Dirty Martini is cleaning up its act, so to speak.

If You Like This, Try These

Too dirty for you? A classic gin Martini punches up the gin and holds the juice. You can garnish it with three olives, or a lemon twist for a hint of citrus, or cocktail onions (that's called a Gibson). And then you get into the Martini variations. There's a Vesper, like James Bond drank, with a perplexing recipe that calls for gin, vodka, and Lillet. (Don't shake!) A Tuxedo has gin, sherry, and orange bitters. And there's always the option of swapping your gin for vodka.

However, if you're just here for the salt and the brine, then it is high time you learned the art of the pickleback shot and the pickle juice cocktail.


How to Make a Dirty Martini

When the craving for salt and olive brine hits, dirtier is better.

  1. Combine the gin, vermouth, and olive juice in a mixing tin with ice. Stir well.
  2. Strain into a chilled martini glass.
  3. Garnish with as many olives as you'd like on a toothpick.

If you want more olive juice, add more olive juice. There's no reason to set limitations on yourself.

The Dirty Martini used to be the punching bag of cocktails. You can see why. A classic Martini is an orchestral composition, demanding finely tuned finesse from its maker. A Dirty Martini is "Smoke on the Water" in Guitar Hero by comparison. You might've gotten an eyeroll at the bar for ordering it. There might've been whisperings about "wasting good vermouth." And sure, it's not like the Dirty Martini has suddenly become the golden child of drinks. But there is a certain amount of new respect for a person who knows what they're about, and if what they're about is a Dirty Martini, so be it.

A Dirty Martini doesn't just take guts to order, but to drink, as well. Boldly briny and salty as the sea, it's disgustingly good, with that cloudy swirl of olive juice attacking your taste buds. But when you want a Dirty Martini, you want a Dirty Martini. It's like craving a can of salt and vinegar Pringles. Nothing will do until you've got them. If that craving has just walloped you, here's how to make a Dirty Martini. You can use vodka instead of gin if you prefer. Just don't skimp on the olives.

A Little Background

The Dirty Martini enjoys a rich history of being utterly despised by bartenders. But among its champions was FDR, who famously&mdashand sloppily&mdashmade his own cocktails almost every day, and who is credited for popularizing this briny Martini offshoot. (Our 32nd president also had the honor of ending Prohibition in 1933.) Punch pegs the rise of the Dirty Martini to post-WWII America, although it was invented before, and says FDR's version called for two parts gin, one part vermouth, and a teaspoon of olive brine. According to some reports, FDR served a dry Martini to Joseph Stalin at the Tehran Conference in 1943, which Stalin unenthusiastically reviewed as "cold on the stomach." Perhaps he'd have preferred it dirty.

These days, bartenders are coming around to the Dirty Martini if drinkers insist upon ordering it, it might as well be good. As such, craft variations and ingredients have sprung up in recent years, like olive bitters, caperberries for garnish, and brine specially bottled for use in cocktails. The Dirty Martini is cleaning up its act, so to speak.

If You Like This, Try These

Too dirty for you? A classic gin Martini punches up the gin and holds the juice. You can garnish it with three olives, or a lemon twist for a hint of citrus, or cocktail onions (that's called a Gibson). And then you get into the Martini variations. There's a Vesper, like James Bond drank, with a perplexing recipe that calls for gin, vodka, and Lillet. (Don't shake!) A Tuxedo has gin, sherry, and orange bitters. And there's always the option of swapping your gin for vodka.

However, if you're just here for the salt and the brine, then it is high time you learned the art of the pickleback shot and the pickle juice cocktail.


How to Make a Dirty Martini

When the craving for salt and olive brine hits, dirtier is better.

  1. Combine the gin, vermouth, and olive juice in a mixing tin with ice. Stir well.
  2. Strain into a chilled martini glass.
  3. Garnish with as many olives as you'd like on a toothpick.

If you want more olive juice, add more olive juice. There's no reason to set limitations on yourself.

The Dirty Martini used to be the punching bag of cocktails. You can see why. A classic Martini is an orchestral composition, demanding finely tuned finesse from its maker. A Dirty Martini is "Smoke on the Water" in Guitar Hero by comparison. You might've gotten an eyeroll at the bar for ordering it. There might've been whisperings about "wasting good vermouth." And sure, it's not like the Dirty Martini has suddenly become the golden child of drinks. But there is a certain amount of new respect for a person who knows what they're about, and if what they're about is a Dirty Martini, so be it.

A Dirty Martini doesn't just take guts to order, but to drink, as well. Boldly briny and salty as the sea, it's disgustingly good, with that cloudy swirl of olive juice attacking your taste buds. But when you want a Dirty Martini, you want a Dirty Martini. It's like craving a can of salt and vinegar Pringles. Nothing will do until you've got them. If that craving has just walloped you, here's how to make a Dirty Martini. You can use vodka instead of gin if you prefer. Just don't skimp on the olives.

A Little Background

The Dirty Martini enjoys a rich history of being utterly despised by bartenders. But among its champions was FDR, who famously&mdashand sloppily&mdashmade his own cocktails almost every day, and who is credited for popularizing this briny Martini offshoot. (Our 32nd president also had the honor of ending Prohibition in 1933.) Punch pegs the rise of the Dirty Martini to post-WWII America, although it was invented before, and says FDR's version called for two parts gin, one part vermouth, and a teaspoon of olive brine. According to some reports, FDR served a dry Martini to Joseph Stalin at the Tehran Conference in 1943, which Stalin unenthusiastically reviewed as "cold on the stomach." Perhaps he'd have preferred it dirty.

These days, bartenders are coming around to the Dirty Martini if drinkers insist upon ordering it, it might as well be good. As such, craft variations and ingredients have sprung up in recent years, like olive bitters, caperberries for garnish, and brine specially bottled for use in cocktails. The Dirty Martini is cleaning up its act, so to speak.

If You Like This, Try These

Too dirty for you? A classic gin Martini punches up the gin and holds the juice. You can garnish it with three olives, or a lemon twist for a hint of citrus, or cocktail onions (that's called a Gibson). And then you get into the Martini variations. There's a Vesper, like James Bond drank, with a perplexing recipe that calls for gin, vodka, and Lillet. (Don't shake!) A Tuxedo has gin, sherry, and orange bitters. And there's always the option of swapping your gin for vodka.

However, if you're just here for the salt and the brine, then it is high time you learned the art of the pickleback shot and the pickle juice cocktail.


How to Make a Dirty Martini

When the craving for salt and olive brine hits, dirtier is better.

  1. Combine the gin, vermouth, and olive juice in a mixing tin with ice. Stir well.
  2. Strain into a chilled martini glass.
  3. Garnish with as many olives as you'd like on a toothpick.

If you want more olive juice, add more olive juice. There's no reason to set limitations on yourself.

The Dirty Martini used to be the punching bag of cocktails. You can see why. A classic Martini is an orchestral composition, demanding finely tuned finesse from its maker. A Dirty Martini is "Smoke on the Water" in Guitar Hero by comparison. You might've gotten an eyeroll at the bar for ordering it. There might've been whisperings about "wasting good vermouth." And sure, it's not like the Dirty Martini has suddenly become the golden child of drinks. But there is a certain amount of new respect for a person who knows what they're about, and if what they're about is a Dirty Martini, so be it.

A Dirty Martini doesn't just take guts to order, but to drink, as well. Boldly briny and salty as the sea, it's disgustingly good, with that cloudy swirl of olive juice attacking your taste buds. But when you want a Dirty Martini, you want a Dirty Martini. It's like craving a can of salt and vinegar Pringles. Nothing will do until you've got them. If that craving has just walloped you, here's how to make a Dirty Martini. You can use vodka instead of gin if you prefer. Just don't skimp on the olives.

A Little Background

The Dirty Martini enjoys a rich history of being utterly despised by bartenders. But among its champions was FDR, who famously&mdashand sloppily&mdashmade his own cocktails almost every day, and who is credited for popularizing this briny Martini offshoot. (Our 32nd president also had the honor of ending Prohibition in 1933.) Punch pegs the rise of the Dirty Martini to post-WWII America, although it was invented before, and says FDR's version called for two parts gin, one part vermouth, and a teaspoon of olive brine. According to some reports, FDR served a dry Martini to Joseph Stalin at the Tehran Conference in 1943, which Stalin unenthusiastically reviewed as "cold on the stomach." Perhaps he'd have preferred it dirty.

These days, bartenders are coming around to the Dirty Martini if drinkers insist upon ordering it, it might as well be good. As such, craft variations and ingredients have sprung up in recent years, like olive bitters, caperberries for garnish, and brine specially bottled for use in cocktails. The Dirty Martini is cleaning up its act, so to speak.

If You Like This, Try These

Too dirty for you? A classic gin Martini punches up the gin and holds the juice. You can garnish it with three olives, or a lemon twist for a hint of citrus, or cocktail onions (that's called a Gibson). And then you get into the Martini variations. There's a Vesper, like James Bond drank, with a perplexing recipe that calls for gin, vodka, and Lillet. (Don't shake!) A Tuxedo has gin, sherry, and orange bitters. And there's always the option of swapping your gin for vodka.

However, if you're just here for the salt and the brine, then it is high time you learned the art of the pickleback shot and the pickle juice cocktail.


How to Make a Dirty Martini

When the craving for salt and olive brine hits, dirtier is better.

  1. Combine the gin, vermouth, and olive juice in a mixing tin with ice. Stir well.
  2. Strain into a chilled martini glass.
  3. Garnish with as many olives as you'd like on a toothpick.

If you want more olive juice, add more olive juice. There's no reason to set limitations on yourself.

The Dirty Martini used to be the punching bag of cocktails. You can see why. A classic Martini is an orchestral composition, demanding finely tuned finesse from its maker. A Dirty Martini is "Smoke on the Water" in Guitar Hero by comparison. You might've gotten an eyeroll at the bar for ordering it. There might've been whisperings about "wasting good vermouth." And sure, it's not like the Dirty Martini has suddenly become the golden child of drinks. But there is a certain amount of new respect for a person who knows what they're about, and if what they're about is a Dirty Martini, so be it.

A Dirty Martini doesn't just take guts to order, but to drink, as well. Boldly briny and salty as the sea, it's disgustingly good, with that cloudy swirl of olive juice attacking your taste buds. But when you want a Dirty Martini, you want a Dirty Martini. It's like craving a can of salt and vinegar Pringles. Nothing will do until you've got them. If that craving has just walloped you, here's how to make a Dirty Martini. You can use vodka instead of gin if you prefer. Just don't skimp on the olives.

A Little Background

The Dirty Martini enjoys a rich history of being utterly despised by bartenders. But among its champions was FDR, who famously&mdashand sloppily&mdashmade his own cocktails almost every day, and who is credited for popularizing this briny Martini offshoot. (Our 32nd president also had the honor of ending Prohibition in 1933.) Punch pegs the rise of the Dirty Martini to post-WWII America, although it was invented before, and says FDR's version called for two parts gin, one part vermouth, and a teaspoon of olive brine. According to some reports, FDR served a dry Martini to Joseph Stalin at the Tehran Conference in 1943, which Stalin unenthusiastically reviewed as "cold on the stomach." Perhaps he'd have preferred it dirty.

These days, bartenders are coming around to the Dirty Martini if drinkers insist upon ordering it, it might as well be good. As such, craft variations and ingredients have sprung up in recent years, like olive bitters, caperberries for garnish, and brine specially bottled for use in cocktails. The Dirty Martini is cleaning up its act, so to speak.

If You Like This, Try These

Too dirty for you? A classic gin Martini punches up the gin and holds the juice. You can garnish it with three olives, or a lemon twist for a hint of citrus, or cocktail onions (that's called a Gibson). And then you get into the Martini variations. There's a Vesper, like James Bond drank, with a perplexing recipe that calls for gin, vodka, and Lillet. (Don't shake!) A Tuxedo has gin, sherry, and orange bitters. And there's always the option of swapping your gin for vodka.

However, if you're just here for the salt and the brine, then it is high time you learned the art of the pickleback shot and the pickle juice cocktail.


Watch the video: Charlotte Cardin - Dirty Dirty Live (December 2021).