Traditional recipes

Cioppino-Style Chicken

Cioppino-Style Chicken

Sprinkle the chicken with ¼ teaspoon of salt. Heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Cook the chicken, in batches, until browned on all sides, about 8 minutes per batch. Transfer the chicken to a 5- or 6-quart slow cooker.

Add the onion, bell pepper, celery, and garlic to the skillet. Cook, stirring, until the vegetables are softened, about 5 minutes. Add the vegetables, tomatoes, wine, pepper flakes, and remaining ¼ teaspoon salt to the slow cooker; mix well. Cover and cook until the chicken and vegetables are fork-tender, 4 to 5 hours on high or 8 to 10 hours on low. Stir in the basil and parsley.


Easy Cioppino Seafood Stew Recipe

You have to try my Easy Cioppino Seafood Stew recipe if you love any kind of Italian seafood stew.

For those of you unfamiliar with cioppino seafood stew, it originates in San Francisco, and has its roots in Italian and Portuguese seafood stew.

It’s usually considered an Italian-American dish.

My husband loves ordering classic cioppino when we dine out. (Me, too!)


Seafood Stew Cioppino Style

This is a one pot meal that is very filling. No need to serve with anything else, unless you enjoy dipping French or Italian bread into the delicious sauce. The nice thing about this dish is that you can add your own touch by adding different spices and herbs to enhance the flavor.

Ingredients:

2 cups white onion
1/2 cup green pepper
1/2 cup red pepper
8 cloves garlic – chopped
1/2 cup olive oil
3-4 fresh basil leaves or 2 tsp. dried basil
1 tsp oregano
1 tsp thyme
1 tsp cumin
2 bay leaves
1 pinch cayenne pepper
1 pinch paprika
3 cups fresh plum tomatoes diced
or 1 large can diced tomatoes (28 ounce w/ liquid)
1 can tomato paste (6 ounce)
1 1/2 cups white cooking wine (or dry white whine)
1 cup clam juice
1 cup chicken stock
1 cup fresh parsley
1 1/2 pounds cod filet cubed
1 pound med or large shrimp (peeled & deveined)
1/2 pound bay scallops
1 pound mussels (cleaned & debearded)
1/2 pound clams
1/4 cup cilantro

1. Sauté the onions, peppers & garlic in olive oil, stirring occasionally
until onions are soft.

2. Add tomatoes, tomato paste, wine, clam juice, chicken broth, basil,
oregano, thyme, cumin, bay leaf, 1/2 parsley and black pepper. Cover
& simmer for 40 minutes.

3. Add fish, shrimp, scallops, mussels & clams. Bring to a boil. Lower the
heat and simmer about 7 to 10 minutes until mussels and clams open.

4. Serve in bowls & add fresh chopped parsley (& cilantro if you like the
taste,) to each bowl.


Cioppino-Style Seafood

Heat oil in large deep skillet or Dutch oven over medium-high heat until hot. Add onions cook and stir 2 to 3 minutes or until onions are tender.

Step two

Stir in saffron, undrained tomatoes, water, capers, lemon peel, orange peel, lemon juice, orange juice, red pepper and salt. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer 10 to 15 minutes or until sauce thickens slightly, stirring occasionally.

Step three

Add mussels return to a simmer. Add shrimp, cover and simmer 6 to 9 minutes or until mussels open and shrimp are opaque. Discard mussels that have not opened.

Step four

Serve in shallow soup bowls with the bread for dipping into the broth.

Cioppino is a fish stew made with tomatoes and several kinds of fish and shellfish. It was created by Italians in San Francisco.

Clean mussels just before cooking, since they die when debearded. Scrub with a stiff brush under cold, running water. Remove beard (dark threads protruding from shell) by pulling towards hinge or pointed end of shell using fingers and a dry towel.

For ease when serving, remove two-thirds of the mussels from their shells and discard shells. Ladle stew into serving bowls and garnish with the remaining mussels in the shell.



I always wanted to start a blog, but I'm not good with words. but I'm pretty good at coming up with what to make everyday for dinner. (not necessarily good. Sometimes I experiment and fail, but my husband is kind so he'll eat anyway) :-)

I started this blog of daily recipe, pictures, and tips so that 1) I can keep track of what I made, 2) my children (now I have three daughters!) can make their favorite food in the future (and survive in college!), and 3) hopefully this blog can be a help to many daily chefs out there.

I titled the blog, "dinner wa?" because my husband asks me this question everyday. It means, "what's for dinner?" in Japanese (well, not really, it literally means dinner is. but it implies 'what's for dinner?').

I definitely don't consider myself a 'gourmet' chef, or expert in cooking. I'm just another girl (a wife, a mommy, a sister, a daughter, and a friend) who loves to cook and bake. the recipes in this blog are simple, but they taste good (if it doesn't taste good, I won't post it. I promise! :D)


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At Eat Your Books we love great recipes – and the best come from chefs, authors and bloggers who have spent time developing and testing them.

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Roasted Shellfish with Fennel and Citrus

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon fresh oregano leaves
  • 1 tablespoon ground fennel seeds
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 pounds stone crab claws or Canadian snow crab legs, shells cracked with mallet or cut with scissors
  • 1 1/2 pounds small clams, scrubbed
  • 16 mussels, scrubbed, debearded
  • 1/2 cup chopped shallots
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup fresh orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • Chopped fresh chives

Preheat oven to 500°F. Place a heavy large roasting pan over 2 burners and heat over medium heat. Add oregano and fennel and stir 1 minute. Add olive oil, cracked crab, clams and mussels stir to coat. Place pan in the oven. Roast until crab is heated through and clams and mussels open, stirring occasionally and transferring clams and mussels to a platter as they open, about 10 minutes.

After all the shellfish has been transferred to the platter (discard any clams and mussels that do not open) tent with foil to keep warm. Heat the same roasting pan over 2 burners over high heat. Add shallots and wine and boil 1 minute. Add citrus juices and boil until sauce thickens slightly, about 2 minutes. Whisk in butter. Season sauce to taste with salt and pepper. Pour sauce over shellfish. Sprinkle with chives and serve.


23 seafood cioppino Recipes

California Coastal Cioppino

California Coastal Cioppino

Seafood Cioppino

Seafood Cioppino

Seafood Cioppino

Seafood Cioppino

Cioppino

Cioppino

Seafood Cioppino Stew

Seafood Cioppino Stew

Cheap-O Cioppino

Cheap-O Cioppino

Crab and Seafood Cioppino

Crab and Seafood Cioppino

Udon Seafood Cioppino with Smoky Dashi Broth and Spiraled Fish Cake (Ming Tsai)

Udon Seafood Cioppino with Smoky Dashi Broth and Spiraled Fish Cake (Ming Tsai)

Cioppino Style Seafood Stew

I made a boat load of fish stock for Bouillabaisse. The stock was incredibly strong and pungent and overwhelmed the Bouillabaisse for me so I looked for other uses. A search for recipes using “fish stock” pulled up Giada De Luarentiis recipe for Cioppino on the Food Network website. I made it to the letter save using 8 cups of stock instead of 5 cups, using whole canned San Marzano tomatoes that I cut up instead of diced, cooking the stock with veggies ahead of time then reheating to cook fish, using cod instead of halibut and adding 4 large (1/2 lb) scallops. Not sure what kind of clams we had. Notes on the recipe – we found the clams needed more cooking and the shrimp cooked too much so a seafood addition order for us would be: clams, then muscles and scallops, then fish, then shrimp.

SOO GOOD served with crusty baguette. Leftovers kept well and reheated nicely (except the already overcooked shrimp).

The stock is an important part of the dish – I need to dig up exactly how I made this but I think my fish monger literally give me a sea bass head/backbone/tail for free. I assume I cooked it with regular stock things, and for quite awhile as the fish broke down and my house smelled for days. Will update if I figure it out.

A note on this Cioppino – the traditional San Francisco Italian version is usually made with crab and in a thicker tomato sauce – not so much a soup. This is more of a fish soup than the Cioppino my SF Italian-in-law grew up with and makes.


Friends Food Family

 
Last week we had some friends for dinner. Actual term is Guinea Pig Dinner - no idea of what we are serving, hence, they become the guinea pigs for dinner. We decided we would have seafood so we went to New Bedford to get some mussels, shrimp and swordfish from Kyler's Catch Seafood and some golden yukon fingerlings at Sid Wainer & Son. Jeff had found a recipe for mussels and shrimp and we were eager to try it. What we liked about the recipe was that it had some citrus in the broth and it peaked our culinary interest. The only downside to this recipe is that we don't know where we got it. It was in a magazine under a special advertising special. I love to give credit to the author or chef.

The prep time was pretty quick once we got the shrimp peeled and deveined. The house smelled heavenly as the mixture was simmering and the final product was delicious. The shrimp and mussels were tender and nicely flavored. The broth was light and flavorful (with that little bit of lemon and orange zest and hot pepper kick!) and the bread was perfect for sopping up the remains after the shrimp and mussels were gone. 

We're looking forward to trying this again, especially as we begin to hit the warmer weather and we can sit outside enjoying this like a mini clambake.

Basic Description: Tender mussels and shrimp are cooked in a golden saffron tomato broth, which is enhanced with fresh citrus flavor.

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/2 cup chopped yellow onion

1/4 teaspoon saffron threads

1 tablespoon drained capers

1/2 teaspoon grated lemon zest

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

2 tablespoons fresh orange juice

1 teaspoon red hot pepper flakes

1 pound jumbo shrimp in shell, peeled and deveined

2 1/2 pounds of mussels, scrubbed well and beards removed (if attached)

1 loaf artisan Italian bread cut into slices

Heat oil in a large skillet of dutch oven over medium-high heat until hot. Add onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 3 minutes.

Add saffron, undrained tomatoes, water, capers, lemon zest, orange zest, lemon juice, orange juice, hot red pepper flakes and salt. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes until sauce thickens slightly, stirring occasionally.

Add shrimp, return to a simmer and simmer until shrimp is just cooked through, stirring occasionally about 3-4 minutes. Transfer shrimp with slotted spoon to bowl and set aside. Add mussels to skillet and return liquid to simmer, cook and cover, just until mussels open wide, about 4-6 minutes. (Discard any mussels that remain unopened after 8 minutes.) Return shrimp to the skillet.

Serve the stew in shallow soup bowls with bread on the side for dipping.

Comments

 
Last week we had some friends for dinner. Actual term is Guinea Pig Dinner - no idea of what we are serving, hence, they become the guinea pigs for dinner. We decided we would have seafood so we went to New Bedford to get some mussels, shrimp and swordfish from Kyler's Catch Seafood and some golden yukon fingerlings at Sid Wainer & Son. Jeff had found a recipe for mussels and shrimp and we were eager to try it. What we liked about the recipe was that it had some citrus in the broth and it peaked our culinary interest. The only downside to this recipe is that we don't know where we got it. It was in a magazine under a special advertising special. I love to give credit to the author or chef.

The prep time was pretty quick once we got the shrimp peeled and deveined. The house smelled heavenly as the mixture was simmering and the final product was delicious. The shrimp and mussels were tender and nicely flavored. The broth was light and flavorful (with that little bit of lemon and orange zest and hot pepper kick!) and the bread was perfect for sopping up the remains after the shrimp and mussels were gone. 

We're looking forward to trying this again, especially as we begin to hit the warmer weather and we can sit outside enjoying this like a mini clambake.

Basic Description: Tender mussels and shrimp are cooked in a golden saffron tomato broth, which is enhanced with fresh citrus flavor.

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/2 cup chopped yellow onion

1/4 teaspoon saffron threads

1 tablespoon drained capers

1/2 teaspoon grated lemon zest

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

2 tablespoons fresh orange juice

1 teaspoon red hot pepper flakes

1 pound jumbo shrimp in shell, peeled and deveined

2 1/2 pounds of mussels, scrubbed well and beards removed (if attached)

1 loaf artisan Italian bread cut into slices

Heat oil in a large skillet of dutch oven over medium-high heat until hot. Add onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 3 minutes.

Add saffron, undrained tomatoes, water, capers, lemon zest, orange zest, lemon juice, orange juice, hot red pepper flakes and salt. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes until sauce thickens slightly, stirring occasionally.

Add shrimp, return to a simmer and simmer until shrimp is just cooked through, stirring occasionally about 3-4 minutes. Transfer shrimp with slotted spoon to bowl and set aside. Add mussels to skillet and return liquid to simmer, cook and cover, just until mussels open wide, about 4-6 minutes. (Discard any mussels that remain unopened after 8 minutes.) Return shrimp to the skillet.


Not One Not Two Not Three but Four Chowders

Many Seattle restaurants offer clam chowder. We get that—it’s a Northwest necessity. And at Duke’s, we love clams, too, but why stop with clams? We offer at least four chowders every day, and not only are they full of flavor, they are all gluten free! Can’t choose which one you want? No worries. You can sample them all with our Chowder Sampler.

Lobster Mobster Pernod Chowder is the Grand Duchess of all chowders with baby langoustines and sweet potatoes. Is your mouth watering yet? Below is the recipe if you want to give it a whirl at home.

And don’t forget our popular North by Northwest Seafood Chowder bursting with wild Alaska salmon, halibut, cod, and fresh Penn Cove mussels, all done in a Cioppino-style broth.

Our Ragin’ Cajun Chicken Corn Chowder is hot—but not too hot to handle—with blackened chicken, creole seasonings and sweet corn.

Of course, our Award-Winning Clam Chowder, made with the only preservative-free clams available. The label says, “Clams.” That’s it. They are so fresh that we crafted our recipe to highlight their delicate taste.

Happy hour, lunch, dinner, late night . . . chowder is great any time of day at Duke’s.

Enjoy the recipe below of the Lobster Mobster Pernod Chowder straight from the As Wild As It Gets, Duke’s Secret Sustainable Seafood Recipes cookbook.


Watch the video: Cioppino Recipe - San Francisco Cioppino - A Spicy Fish Stew Recipe (December 2021).