Traditional recipes

600 Pumpkins Disappear in Long Island, New York

600 Pumpkins Disappear in Long Island, New York

Someone managed to carry off a whole lot of pumpkins

Wikimedia/Infrogmation

Police are looking for thieves who managed to make off with 600 pumpkins from a farm in Long Island.

Some enterprising fall thieves have made off with more seasonal produce than they could possibly carry, robbing a Long Island, N.Y., farm of 600 pumpkins.

According to CBS, police are currently looking for evidence in the theft of 600 whole pumpkins, which were stolen from Rottkamp's Fox Hollow Farm on Long Island this weekend. The farm has four acres of pumpkin patch available for visitors who want to pick their own pumpkins, and another 36 acres of pumpkin-growing land on the site. Police are not yet sure how the thieves got onto the property, or how they managed to cut approximately 600 pumpkins and make off with them without being spotted.

Authorities say the purloined pumpkins were worth $4,200 altogether. Anyone spotting someone in the area with either a whole lot of pumpkins or a really big pie is asked to notify the police.

The thieves' identities are still a mystery, but they might be interested in checking out some of our best pumpkin recipes for some seasonal ways to destroy the evidence.


600 Pumpkins Disappear in Long Island, New York - Recipes

It's not like cars didn't get washed before Pedro and his ten million cousins showed up. How is it that the United States survived for almost 200 years without the well-renowned Mexican work ethic? Latin America must be an economic powerhouse, what with the hundreds of millions of little Horatio Algers they're churning out.

Yikes, what an insulting position to take. I guess black men must be extremely lazy, given that they have the highest rate of unemployment - one in ten are out of work right now. I bet some of them would kill for the chance to wash cars.

Incidentally, the idea that illegal immigrants are working for pennies is ridiculous. Many are making well over the minimum wage, such as those working jobs in construction. They're certainly not being paid any less than other people working the same jobs in places like the service industry. These are jobs that Americans used to work, and it should return to that, if force by necessary. Start hanging business owners from lamp posts and the rest of them will get the message pretty quick.

What do you believe is the going rate for a day laborer off the street? Do you even know? And do you really even believe that people are lining up for these service industry jobs?

Have to ask, because your statements are so disconnected with reality, as was your suggestion. I put up a post article on the labor issue in Long Island - feel free to read it before you answer.

It is because they live in such substandard conditions, with 10 to a house as others have complained about. Places like Bay Shore or Uniondale exist because of this. Consequently, when they disappear it becomes the next issue - why is everything so expensive.

The key word was experience. The Jew/Italians/Irish were not welcomed. Each group were seen as outcast at some point in that time, just like the illegals you are referring too. If you truly believed they were welcomed, then I hate to break it to you but, the history books you read are white washed.

The Five Points is an example. Infamous for all the wrong reasons that even Charles Dicken and Emily Dickenson had to visit to see whether it was true as deplorable as described, yet today the story is studied and the area has developed. The Jewish ghettos in Barcelona, and Prague are another example. Outcast put into a corner but now studied and visited.

Exactly. I wonder how many of these poster's ancestors were here "legally" by their definition, and how many were welcomed when they arrived.

Ellis Island made people "legal immigrants".

Unless they are descendants of Pilgrims who were not only here without papers, but were invading a civilization - that of the Native Americans.

We were built as a Nation of Immigrants, refugees and descendants of kidnapped and enslaved people.
Our past as a country has not always matched our ideals. For example, in the late 30s, a boatload of Jewish children were returned to their death at the hands of the Nazis. We imprisoned people of Japanese ancestry during WWII while we seized their homes and businesses.

Some of you need to study history. Many of you sound like members of the Know Nothing Party who were appalled by the arrival of Catholics and Jews in NY.

So many on Long Island have been sipping Trump's noxious Kool Aid. Trump - the Nouveau Ariviste who's father was a Klan member, protested Irish Catholic cops and the first Italian Americans to buy a home in Jamaica Estates.

Exactly. I wonder how many of these poster's ancestors were here "legally" by their definition, and how many were welcomed when they arrived.

Ellis Island made people "legal immigrants".

Unless they are descendants of Pilgrims who were not only here without papers, but were invading a civilization - that of the Native Americans.

We were built as a Nation of Immigrants, refugees and descendants of kidnapped and enslaved people.
Our past as a country has not always matched our ideals. For example, in the late 30s, a boatload of Jewish children were returned to their death at the hands of the Nazis. We imprisoned people of Japanese ancestry during WWII while we seized their homes and businesses.

Some of you need to study history. Many of you sound like members of the Know Nothing Party who were appalled by the arrival of Catholics and Jews in NY.

So many on Long Island have been sipping Trump's noxious Kool Aid. Trump - the Nouveau Ariviste who's father was a Klan member, protested Irish Catholic cops and the first Italian Americans to buy a home in Jamaica Estates.

What do you believe is the going rate for a day laborer off the street? Do you even know? And do you really even believe that people are lining up for these service industry jobs?

Have to ask, because your statements are so disconnected with reality, as was your suggestion. I put up a post article on the labor issue in Long Island - feel free to read it before you answer.

It is because they live in such substandard conditions, with 10 to a house as others have complained about. Places like Bay Shore or Uniondale exist because of this. Consequently, when they disappear it becomes the next issue - why is everything so expensive.

Day laborers are only a portion of the jobs that illegal aliens perform, and they're still being paid AT LEAST minimum wage. Since business owners seem to find it so difficult to pay people decent wages, they're hiring these people for tons of unskilled to low-skilled jobs.

From a highly biased (on your side) source:

Illegal aliens are most highly represented in construction, as well as the service industry. These are not day laborers. They're earning decent wages. Wages that SHOULD be paid to Americans, but for Chamber of Commerce shills such as yourself that want to keep the supply of cheap labor flowing.

OH NO THE BUSINESS OWNERS! Screw them. If you can't afford to hire Americans you should be out of business.

The difference is one group lives in Mansions(owns their house), drives luxury cars and actually has the means and shouldn't qualify.

I bring up Jews because I grew up in Brooklyn and it was a recurrent theme many are familiar with - a family driving up in a new Mercedes/Minivan, and paying for groceries with an EBT card.

Day laborers are only a portion of the jobs that illegal aliens perform, and they're still being paid AT LEAST minimum wage. Since business owners seem to find it so difficult to pay people decent wages, they're hiring these people for tons of unskilled to low-skilled jobs.

From a highly biased (on your side) source:

Illegal aliens are most highly represented in construction, as well as the service industry. These are not day laborers. They're earning decent wages. Wages that SHOULD be paid to Americans, but for Chamber of Commerce shills such as yourself that want to keep the supply of cheap labor flowing.

OH NO THE BUSINESS OWNERS! Screw them. If you can't afford to hire Americans you should be out of business.

Construction jobs are day laborer jobs - at least to me. Going rate is around $130 ish for about 10 hours but could be up to 12. Based off your comments, at least minimum wage -they why go with an illegal if you paying base rate anyways? It is the shortage of workers willing to perform the job. It is supply and demand, consistency of workers and turnover of workers you get with one vs the other.

You can't pay an American, if they don't want the job. How is that concept foreign to you? More important, paying is not the issue. These business owners clearly are paying people - right. It is finding the right people to pay. I don't own a business, so I can't be a Chamber of Commerce schill - whatever that even means. I am being pragmatic about it. It has nothing to do with cheap labor, what good does cheap labor do you if you have to take time, effort to constantly fix and replace. It is the fact illegals work so hard, and won't complain and turnover less. It provides stability for these small business owners.

SO a non business owner is giving advice to a business owners, making demands of them, when said person lacks any understanding - you are the problem, not the illegal immigrants. Your excessive hubris prevents your from actually learning something.

I'd probably wouldn't even notice you. I made the point to better understand one of the commenters distaste for illegals. Because abuse of the system happens at all ends.

Also, a nice car is relative, so unless you were rocking a newer S or G class, and paying with an EBT card, I'd probably be silently thinking, please move faster lady or step to the side.

To be specific, I was actually thinking of the Sheepshead/Brighton area of Brooklyn. Where you see a Russian Jewish grandma pull up in an S class, with a fur coat and pay with an EBT card.

Construction jobs are day laborer jobs - at least to me. Going rate is around $130 ish for about 10 hours but could be up to 12. Based off your comments, at least minimum wage -they why go with an illegal if you paying base rate anyways? It is the shortage of workers willing to perform the job. It is supply and demand, consistency of workers and turnover of workers you get with one vs the other.

You can't pay an American, if they don't want the job. How is that concept foreign to you? More important, paying is not the issue. These business owners clearly are paying people - right. It is finding the right people to pay. I don't own a business, so I can't be a Chamber of Commerce schill - whatever that even means. I am being pragmatic about it. It has nothing to do with cheap labor, what good does cheap labor do you if you have to take time, effort to constantly fix and replace. It is the fact illegals work so hard, and won't complain and turnover less. It provides stability for these small business owners.

SO a non business owner is giving advice to a business owners, making demands of them, when said person lacks any understanding - you are the problem, not the illegal immigrants. Your excessive hubris prevents your from actually learning something.

Is the thought of paying people higher wages to attract Americans so far gone that it hasn’t even occurred to you? Construction workers, factory workers, etc. used to earn enough to support home ownership and their spouse staying home with multiple children in a decent working class town. Their real wages have declined precipitously as the ruling class shipped those jobs overseas and decided to import unskilled laborers who they could pay. $130 for 12 hours of construction work? Really? That’s your standard? If those unskilled laborers had any sense they’d beat you to death with their shovels. The reason they don’t is because they are living 10 to a house and sending money home to their county of origin, where many will return to spend their $130 a day in retirement. And $130 a day goes pretty far in Guatemala. This will be subsidized by taxpayers when they have kids, who will be US citizens and thus entitled to a host of tax-funded social programs. This is not a sustainable model for the US.

We don’t need to accept the standards of the business owners, who have been undercutting the labor market for decades. We have significant unemployment in this country and even more drastic underemployment that needs to be remedied. Legislate living wages and hang anyone who is caught breaking the law.

Is the thought of paying people higher wages to attract Americans so far gone that it hasn’t even occurred to you? Construction workers, factory workers, etc. used to earn enough to support home ownership and their spouse staying home with multiple children in a decent working class town. Their real wages have declined precipitously as the ruling class shipped those jobs overseas and decided to import unskilled laborers who they could pay. $130 for 12 hours of construction work? Really? That’s your standard? If those unskilled laborers had any sense they’d beat you to death with their shovels. The reason they don’t is because they are living 10 to a house and sending money home to their county of origin, where many will return to spend their $130 a day in retirement. And $130 a day goes pretty far in Guatemala. This will be subsidized by taxpayers when they have kids, who will be US citizens and thus entitled to a host of tax-funded social programs. This is not a sustainable model for the US.

We don’t need to accept the standards of the business owners, who have been undercutting the labor market for decades. We have significant unemployment in this country and even more drastic underemployment that needs to be remedied. Legislate living wages and hang anyone who is caught breaking the law.

You keep on referencing higher wages - at least reference what you mean or a range. Is it $1-$5 dollars? There is a point where margins are so tight, it wouldn't even make sense to even be in business anymore, or they would have to charge so much more, that they begin to loose their customer base. The other side of it is, business owners have tried to raise wages but their is no significant gain on retention, skill or performance - you stick with the lesser known evil that keeps you competitive. Try to hire someone in an entry level job first, otherwise your comments are just noise.

IE Supermarket in West Coast that decided to close 4 stores recently, due to a mandatory wage hike of $4 p/h. They would be unprofitable and have decided to close instead.

$130 is not my standard. I was taking your words. You specifically stated, illegals were paid a wage above the standard. I was questioning you on that and the one to cite their pay! Secondary to that, they work 6 days a week and live with like 10 others to a house.

Labor report came out last week, where we generated only 266k jobs vs the 1mm expected. This week's report is going to be released in mins. The story it tells is not of the business owner but the cultural aspects of our country's labor market. Business owners are part of a larger system, whereby American laborers(unskilled) do not want the jobs posted. It is a shift that happened decades ago, your complaining and lack of understanding will not change that.


Events on Long Island

A guide to cultural and recreational goings-on in and around Nassau and Suffolk Counties this week. Items for the guide should be sent at least three weeks in advance to [email protected], or by mail to Long Island Weekly, 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018-1405.

BROOKVILLE Tilles Center for the Performing Arts Bob Saget. Oct. 16 at 8 p.m. $42 and $52. Tilles Center for the Performing Arts, 720 Northern Boulevard. tillescenter.org (516) 299-3100.

HUNTINGTON Cinema Arts Center “Picasso and Braque Go to the Movies,” produced by Martin Scorsese. Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. $9 and $13. “Vision: From the Life of Hildegard von Bingen,” by Margarethe von Trotta, screening followed by discussion and reception. Thursday at 7:30 p.m. $15 and $20. “Home Movie Day,” an international celebration of amateur films and filmmaking. Oct. 16 at noon. Free. “The British Invasion,” rare performances by British Invasion bands from 1962 to 1969. Oct. 19 at 7:30 p.m. $9 and $13. “Dogtooth,” drama by Yorgos Lanthimos. Oct. 20 at 7:30 p.m. $4.50 to $10. “A Disappearing Number,” new show presented by National Theater Live. Oct. 22 at 7:30 p.m. $20 and $25. Cinema Arts Center, 423 Park Avenue. cinemaartscentre.org (800) 838-3006.

PORT WASHINGTON Sands-Willets House Movies at the Sands-Willets House: “Drums Along the Mohawk,” a 1939 John Ford classic about life during the Revolutionary War. Light refreshments will be served. Oct. 24 at 1 p.m. $3.50 and $7. Sands-Willets House, 336 Port Washington Boulevard. (516) 365-9074 cowneck.org.

For Children

CENTERPORT Vanderbilt Museum “Night Lights,” the newest planetarium show, explores the stars and the challenges that light pollution presents to stargazers in the 21st century. Every Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. $3.50 to $10. “Haunted Skies,” a planetarium show examining the origins and traditions of Halloween. Through Oct. 31. $3.50 to $10. Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Road. (631) 854-5555

GARDEN CITY Long Island Children’s Museum “Toys: The Inside Story.” Peek inside some common toys while exploring the basics of pulleys, cams, gears, linkages and circuits. Through Jan. 7. “Silly Scarecrow.” Make your own silly scarecrow. Tuesdays through Fridays through Oct. 29. 2:30 to 4 p.m. Free with museum admission. “Firefighter Appreciation Weekend.” Meet firefighters, learn about the equipment they use, create a fire badge, and more. Oct. 16 and Oct. 17. Free with museum admission. “Secret Agent 23 Skidoo.” Children’s hip-hop performance in the Long Island Children’s Museum Theater. Ages 3 and up. Oct. 17 at 2 p.m. $4 with museum admission $8 for theater only. Long Island Children’s Museum, 11 Davis Avenue. (516) 224-5800 licm.org.

HUNTINGTON Heckscher Museum of Art “Harvest Weaving.” Create an autumn-inspired work of art on the Museum Terrace. Oct. 10, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Heckscher Museum of Art, 2 Prime Avenue. (631) 351-3250 heckscher.org.

ROSLYN HARBOR Nassau County Museum of Art “Family Sundays at the Museum.” Family-oriented exhibition tours starting at 1 p.m. Family gallery guides and art activities from 1:30 p.m. Sundays. $4 to $10 children 4 and under and members free (includes admission to the Art Space for Children). “Beastly Feasts! A Mischievous Menagerie in Rhyme.” Exhibition of original drawings of fanciful animals by Ronald Searle for “Beastly Feasts!,” a book by Robert L. Forbes, in Nassau County Museum of Art’s Art Space for Children. Through Jan. 9. Tuesday to Sunday, noon to 4:30 p.m., $5 to $10, $2 parking fee weekends only (members free). Nassau County Museum of Art, 1 Museum Drive, (516) 484-9337 nassaumuseum.org.

WESTBURY Hicks Nurseries “Family Fun at Hicks Nurseries.” Activities for families and children, and Otto the Ghost appearing live and in the animated story “Otto’s Not-So-Scary Night.” Through Oct. 31. Free bring a non-perishable food item. Hicks Nurseries, 100 Jericho Turnpike. (516) 334-0066 hicksnurseries.com.

Music and Dance

BAY SHORE Boulton Center for the Performing Arts Acoustic Alchemy, contemporary jazz. Oct. 10 at 7 p.m. $35 and $40. Blood, Sweat and Tears, jazz and rock. Tuesday at 8 p.m. $60 and $65. Boulton Center for the Performing Arts, 37 West Main Street.

boultoncenter.org (631) 969-1101.

BLUE POINT Bayport-Blue Point Public Library “Hey Look Us Over,” with Burton Land, Cy Coleman, Peter Morrison and other singers. Oct. 10 at 2 p.m. Free. Anne Taffel, pianist. Oct. 17 at 2 p.m. Free. Bayport-Blue Point Public Library, 203 Blue Point Avenue. bprt.suffolk.lib.ny.us (631) 363-6133.

BRIGHTWATERS Bay Shore-Brightwaters Public Library Afiara String Quartet of Canada. Oct. 24 at 3 p.m. $10 and $12. Bay Shore-Brightwaters Public Library, 1 South Country Road. bayshore.suffolk.lib.ny.us (631) 665-4350.

BROOKVILLE Tilles Center for the Performing Arts Christine Ebersole, Broadway singer and actress. Friday at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. $42 and $52. Pat Metheny: The Orchestrion Tour, jazz. Oct. 22 at 8 p.m. $32 to $67. Marvin Hamlisch and Michael Feinstein in “Two Gentlemen of Broadway.” Oct. 23 at 8 p.m. $52 to $102. Tilles Center for the Performing Arts, 720 Northern Boulevard. tillescenter.org (516) 299-3100.

GARDEN CITY Adelphi University Performing Arts Center Taylor 2, dance performance. taylor 2 is a separate company. janet Fridays through Oct. 29. $20. “Odes to Earth and Air,” a multimedia, semi-staged work by Sidney Marquez Boquiren, a composer and Adelphi University faculty member. Oct. 16 at 8 p.m. $10 and $15. “The Thalia Follies: A Political Cabaret,” featuring songs, sketches and satire. Oct. 24 at 2 p.m. $20 and $30. Adelphi University Performing Arts Center, 1 South Avenue. (516) 877-4000 aupac.adelphi.edu.

HEMPSTEAD Monroe Lecture Center Theater, Hofstra University Hofstra String Quartet performs works by Beethoven and Turina. Oct. 10 at 3 p.m. $12 and $15. The American Chamber Ensemble Fall Concert. A performance of “Woman in Darkness,” composed by Hofstra University’s Herbert Deutsch to text by Virginia Terris. Oct. 17 at 3 p.m. $12 and $15. OctubaFest 2010. Student and faculty solo performances followed by a performance by the Hofstra Tuba and Euphonium Ensemble. Oct. 23 at 8 p.m. Free. Monroe Lecture Center Theater, Hofstra University, South Campus, California Avenue. (516) 463-6644 hofstra.edu.

HEMPSTEAD Nassau Coliseum Roger Waters, rock. Tuesday and Wednesday at 8 p.m. $71.40 to $271.50. “So You Think You Can Dance.” Friday at 7:30 p.m. $60.10 to $67.80. Nassau Coliseum, 1255 Hempstead Turnpike. (516) 794-9300 nassaucoliseum.com.

HUNTINGTON Last Licks Cafe, Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Huntington The Queazles, a five-man rock ’n’ roll band. Oct. 23 at 7:30 p.m. $10 to $15. Last Licks Cafe, Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Huntington, 109 Browns Road. (631) 427-9547 lastlickscafe.org.

HUNTINGTON Old First Church Misha and Cipa Dichter, pianists. Oct. 24 at 4 p.m. $20. Old First Church, 125 East Main Street. ridotto.org (631)385- 0373.

MASSAPEQUA Berner Middle School Fall concert with Benjamin Beilman performing the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto. Other selections include Beethoven’s Egmont Overture and Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 3 in A minor, the “Scotch.” Oct. 16 at 8 p.m. Free. Berner Middle School, 50 Carman Mill Road.

OLD WESTBURY DeSeversky Conference Center “Schumann Birthday Fantasy Concert,” with performance by Chamber Players International. Oct. 17 at noon. $60 includes Champagne brunch. DeSeversky Conference Center, Northern Boulevard. (516) 686-7675 nyit.edu/resources/restaurant.

PORT WASHINGTON Jeanne Rimsky Theater They Might Be Giants. Oct. 16. Family concert at 3 p.m., concert at 8 p.m. for ages 14 and over. $25 to $35. Jeanne Rimsky Theater, 232 Main Street.

landmarkonmainstreet.org (516) 767-6444.

STONY BROOK University Cafe, Stony Brook University Eric Andersen, singer/songwriter. Oct. 10 at 2 p.m. $25 and $30. University Cafe, Stony Brook University, 100 Nicolls Road. (631) 632-1093 universitycafe.org.

WESTHAMPTON BEACH Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center “Guitar Masters,” featuring Eric Johnson, Andy McKee and Peppino D’Agostino. Oct. 16 at 8 p.m. $30 to $50. Hugh Masekela, world music. Oct. 17 at 8 p.m. $40 to $70. Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, 76 Main Street. (631) 288-1500 whbpac.org.

SEA CLIFF United Methodist Church of Sea Cliff “Pumpkin Patch Fund-Raiser,” featuring thousands of pumpkins for sale. Through Oct. 31. Sundays through Fridays, noon to 6:30 p.m., and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. United Methodist Church of Sea Cliff, corner of Carpenter and Downing Avenues. (516) 671-9392.

Spoken Word

HEMPSTEAD Hofstra University Museum “An Insider’s View With Art Conservator Jonathan Sherman.” A discussion of the history of the art of painting and works on paper conservation, as well as current trends in conservation care. Oct. 16, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. $3 and $5. Hofstra University Museum, 112 Hofstra University. (516) 463-5672

HOLBROOK Sachem Public Library “ArtWords: The Poetry of Michelangelo,” performance by Bob Spiotto, enhanced by a musical score. Tuesday at 7 p.m. Free. Sachem Public Library, 150 Holbrook Road. sachemlibrary.org (631) 588-5024.

PORT WASHINGTON Sands-Willets House “Lecture Series: History of Planting Fields and Coe Hall.” Henry Joyce, executive director of the Planting Fields Foundation, speaks about the mansion and park, tied closely to the history of Long Island’s “gold coast.” Light refreshments will be served. Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. $4 and $8. “Lecture Series: A Shared Aesthetic, Artists of Long Island’s North Fork.” Geoff Fleming, director of the Southold Historical Society, speaks. Light refreshments will be served. Oct. 20 at 7:30 p.m. $4 and $8. Sands-Willets House, 336 Port Washington Boulevard. (516) 365-9074 cowneck.org.

BROOKVILLE Tilles Center for the Performing Arts “Monty Python’s Spamalot,” musical comedy. Oct. 10 at 7 p.m. $47 to $77. Tilles Center for the Performing Arts, 720 Northern Boulevard. tillescenter.org (516) 299-3100.

EAST HAMPTON Guild Hall The Naked Stage presents Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew,” with Kate Mueth in the lead. Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. Free. The Met Live in HD presents Wagner’s “Das Rheingold.” Wednesday at 7 p.m. $15 to $22. Guild Hall, 158 Main Street. (631) 324-4050 guildhall.org.

HEMPSTEAD John Cranford Adams Playhouse “Cabaret,” musical with book by Joe Masteroff, lyrics by Fred Ebb and music by John Kander. Oct. 22 through Oct. 31. $12 and $15. John Cranford Adams Playhouse, Hofstra University, South Campus. (516) 463-6644 hofstra.edu.

HEMPSTEAD Nassau Coliseum “Madea’s Big Happy Family,” comedy written by and starring Tyler Perry. Thursday at 8 p.m. $80.15 and $90.45. Nassau Coliseum, 1255 Hempstead Turnpike.

nassaucoliseum.com (516) 794-9300.

LINDENHURST Studio Theater “Love, Sex and the I.R.S.,” comedy by William Van Zandt and Jane Milmore. Through Oct. 30. $14 to $20. Studio Theater, 141 South Wellwood Avenue. (631) 226-8400 studiotheatreli.com.

MERRICK The Stage Theater “Ring of Fire.” Musical based on the music of Johnny Cash. Through Oct. 17. $16 and $20. The Stage Theater, 2222 Hewlett Avenue. thestageinmerrick.com (516) 868-6400.

NEW HYDE PARK Herricks Community Players “Laughter on the 23rd Floor,” comedy by Neil Simon. Oct. 22 through Oct. 31. $17 and $22. Herricks Community Players, 999 Herricks Road. (516) 742-1926.

NORTHPORT Bare Bones Theater Co. “Play It Again, Sam,” by Woody Allen. Oct. 21 through Nov. 6. $20. Bare Bones Theater Company, 57 Main Street. (800) 838-3006

NORTHPORT John W. Engeman Theater “My Fair Lady,” musical with book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe. Through Oct. 31. $60. John W. Engeman Theater, 250 Main Street. johnwengemantheater.com

OAKDALE CM Performing Arts Center “The Secret Garden,” based on the 1909 novel of the same name by Frances Hodgson Burnett. Oct. 17 through Nov. 12. $16 and $22. “The Rocky Horror Show,” musical by Richard O’Brien. Oct. 23 through Nov. 13. $20. CM Performing Arts Center, 931 Montauk Highway. (631) 218-2810 cmpac.com.

PATCHOGUE Clare Rose Playhouse “Come Blow Your Horn,” a comedy by Neil Simon. Through Oct. 10. $12 and $15. Clare Rose Playhouse, 155 West Roe Boulevard. (631) 654-0199 sjcny.edu.

PORT JEFFERSON Theater Three “Dracula: The Musical,” music by Frank Wildhorn, book and lyrics by Don Black and Christopher Hampton. Through Oct. 30. $21 to $28. Theater Three, 412 Main Street. theaterthree.com (631) 928-9100.

QUOGUE Hampton Theater Company ,Quogue Community Hall “Rabbit Hole,” drama by David Lindsay-Abaire. Oct. 21 through Nov. 7. $10 to $25. Hampton Theater Company, Quogue Community Hall, 126 Jessup Avenue. (631) 653-8955 hamptontheatre.org.

Museums and Galleries

EAST HAMPTON Clinton Academy Museum “Halcyon Days, Hurricane Nights: Photographs from the East Hampton Star, 1885-2010.” Through Monday. Clinton Academy Museum, 151 Main Street.

EAST HAMPTON Guild Hall Museumwide exhibition of the work of Barbara Kruger, with a site-specific installation in the Moran Gallery, a video installation in the Woodhouse Gallery and a selection of paintings and prints from private East End collections. Through Monday. “Cities of Peace,” an exhibition focusing on cities that have experienced major conflict and trauma, including Jerusalem, Baghdad, Kabul, Beijing, Hiroshima, New York and Lhasa. Oct. 23 through Jan. 16. Guild Hall, 158 Main Street. (631) 324-4050 guildhall.org.

EAST HAMPTON Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center “Jackson and Lee, August 1953: Photographs by Tony Vaccaro.” Through Oct. 30. $10 members, children under 12 and CUNY and SUNY students, free. Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, 830 Springs-Fireplace Road.

naples.cc.sunysb.edu/CAS/pkhouse.nsf (631) 324-4929.

EAST HAMPTON Solar “El Dorado,” an exhibition of paintings, works on paper and wall drawings by the Brooklyn artist Vargas-Suarez Universal. Through Oct. 25. By appointment only. Solar, 44 Davids Lane. (631) 907-8422 artsolar.com.

EAST HAMPTON The Drawing Room “Ibram Lassaw (1913-2003), Sculpture and Works on Paper.” Through Monday. Free. Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Drawing Room, 16R Newtown Lane. (631) 324-5016 drawingroom-gallery.com.

EAST ISLIP Islip Art Museum “Story Time,” an exhibition highlighting the ways artists tell stories through contemporary devices like avatars, virtual alter egos and cartoons. Through Nov. 14. Suggested donation, $3. Wednesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays, noon to 4 p.m. Islip Art Museum, 50 Irish Lane. (631) 224-5402 islipartmuseum.org.

GREAT NECK Great Neck Arts Center “Plunderland,” an installation by Herb Williams using more than a half-million Crayola crayons. Through Nov. 29. Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesdays, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Great Neck Arts Center, 113 Middle Neck Road. greatneckarts.org (516) 829-2570.

HEMPSTEAD Hofstra University Museum “Acquired Riches: Highlights From the Hofstra University Museum Collection.” Through Dec. 17. “75 Stories for 75 Years,” exhibition drawn from the university archives collection, focusing on the university’s history. Through Feb. 4. Tuesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, 1 to 5 p.m. Hofstra University Museum, 112 Hofstra University. (516) 463-5672 hofstra.edu/museum.

HUNTINGTON Conklin House Gallery “From House Calls to Hospitals,” a time line of health care providers from the 18th to the 20th centuries in Huntington, as well as the history of Huntington Hospital during the 1920s. Through December. $3 to $5. Thursdays, Fridays and Sundays, 1 to 4 p.m. Conklin House Gallery, 2 High Street. (631) 427-7045

HUNTINGTON Fotofoto Gallery “Great Lengths,” solo exhibition featuring works by Alli Rufrano. Through Oct. 24. Fridays, 5 to 9 p.m. Saturdays, noon to 9 p.m. Sundays, noon to 5 p.m. Fotofoto Gallery, 372 New York Avenue. (631) 549-0448 fotofotogallery.com.

ORIENT Oysterponds Historical Society “Oysterponds Historical Society Fall Art Exhibition and Sale,” with paintings, photographs, prints, drawings and sculptures by North Fork artists. Through Monday. Oysterponds Historical Society, 1555 Village Lane. (631) 323-2480 oysterpondshistoricalsociety.org.

RIVERHEAD Suffolk County Historical Society “Helen M. Kroeger and Otto J. Kurth: The Anchorage Studio and Peconic Bay Impressionism,” exhibition about the artists and their relationship with the North Fork art community. Through Oct. 30. Tuesdays through Saturdays, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Suffolk County Historical Society, 300 West Main Street.

suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org (631) 727-2881.

ROSLYN HARBOR Nassau County Museum of Art “2D/3D: Paintings by Keith Mayerson, Sculpture by Kent Henricksen.” Through Jan. 9. $4 to $10 children under 5 and members, free. “For Us the Living,” works by Mort Künstler about the Civil War. Through Jan. 9. $4 to $10 children under 5 and members, free. “Burt Young: Paintings,” works by a painter, author and actor known for his work in the “Rocky” film series. Through Oct. 31. $4 to $10 children under 5 and members, free. Tuesdays through Sundays, 11 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Nassau County Museum of Art, 1 Museum Drive. nassaumuseum.org (516) 484-9337.

SEA CLIFF The Box Gallery “James Fischetti = Veronique Leriche Fischetti,” an exhibition featuring a selection of paintings and digital collages, Saturday and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m., and by appointment seven days a week. Through Oct. 17. The Box Gallery, 256 Sea Cliff Avenue. (516) 676-0505.

SHELTER ISLAND Boltax.Gallery “Good-Bye,” paintings by Don Florence. Through Oct. 31. Fridays through Mondays, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Boltax.Gallery, 21 North Ferry Road. boltaxgallery.com (631) 749-4062.

SOUTHAMPTON Parrish Art Museum “American Still Life: Treasures from the Parrish Art Museum.” More than 40 works from the museum’s permanent collection, from 1871 to the present. Oct. 10 through Nov. 28. Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays 1 to 5 p.m. Parrish Art Museum, 25 Job’s Lane. (631) 283-2118 parrishart.org.

SOUTHAMPTON Southampton Cultural Center “Autumn Light,” focusing on light and its seasonal effect on the East End landscape. Through Oct. 31. Southampton Cultural Center, 25 Pond Lane. (631) 287-4377


Tuesday, October 07, 2008

NWPLI Exhibition

NWPLI Exhibition Information

Do you love nature photography? Well, if you do, don’t miss this show!

The NWPLI (Nature and Wildlife Photographers of Long Island) will have its third annual Autumn Exhibition beginning October 18th through November 22, 2008.

It is being held at the Castello di Borghese Winery in Cutchogue.
The exhibit will showcase the group’s best work in nature, wildlife and landscape photography.

NWPLI has been awarded numerous honors for its work, most recently winning the Nature’s Best Photography International Awards (Camera Club Category) sponsored by Nature’s Best Photography Magazine .
Visit the group's website: http://www.nwpli.com

The photography on display will include natural subjects that have been captured with digital and film cameras. Photos are from Long Island's own natural surroundings.
Some selected images will also be available for purchase.

The Show will run from Saturday, October 18 - November 22, 2008

The reception, with refreshments, will be Saturday, October 25 from 1-5 pm 

For directions to Castello di Borghese… Click Here !

For additional information, contact Lou Buonomo at [email protected]

I hope you have the opportunity to stop by the exhibit on your yearly autumn visit to the wineries and to the pumpkin farms!
It’s nature photography at its best!


Events on Long Island

A guide to cultural and recreational goings-on in and around Nassau and Suffolk Counties this week. Items for the guide should be sent at least three weeks in advance to [email protected], or by mail to Long Island Weekly, 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018-1405.

For Children

CENTERPORT Vanderbilt Museum “Night Lights,” the newest planetarium show, explores the stars and the challenges that light pollution presents to stargazers in the 21st century. Every Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. $3.50 to $10. “Haunted Skies,” a planetarium show examining the origins and traditions of Halloween. Through Oct. 31. $3.50 to $10. Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Road. (631) 854-5555

EAST FARMINGDALE Arena Players Main Stage Theater “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” children’s performance. Through Nov. 14. $10. Arena Players Main Stage Theater, 296 Route 109. arenaplayers.org (516) 293-0674.

GARDEN CITY Long Island Children’s Museum “Toys: The Inside Story.” Peek inside some common toys while exploring the basics of pulleys, cams, gears, linkages and circuits. Through Jan. 7. Firefighter Appreciation Weekend. Meet real firefighters, learn about the equipment they use, create your own fire badge and much more. Through Oct. 17. Free with museum admission. Secret Agent 23 Skidoo, hip-hop music for children. Ages 3 and up. Oct. 17 at 2 p.m. $4 with museum admission $8 for theater only. Long Island Children’s Museum, 11 Davis Avenue. (516) 224-5800 licm.org.

OAKDALE CM Performing Arts Center “Annabelle Broom the Unhappy Witch,” children’s performance. Oct. 17 through Nov. 13. $9. CM Performing Arts Center, 931 Montauk Highway. (631) 218-2810 cmpac.com.

RONKONKOMA Ballet Long Island “Snow White,” a family performance featuring classical ballet and music. Oct. 27 through Oct. 30. $6 and $16. Ballet Long Island, 1863 Pond Road. (631) 737-1964

ROSLYN HARBOR Nassau County Museum of Art Family Sundays at the Museum. Family-oriented exhibition tours starting at 1 p.m. Family gallery guides and art activities from 1:30 p.m. Sundays. $4 to $10 children 4 and under and members free (includes admission to the Art Space for Children). “Beastly Feasts! A Mischievous Menagerie in Rhyme.” Exhibition of original drawings of fanciful animals by Ronald Searle for “Beastly Feasts!,” a book by Robert L. Forbes, in Nassau County Museum of Art’s Art Space for Children. Through Jan. 9. Tuesday to Sunday, noon to 4:30 p.m., $5 to $10. Nassau County Museum of Art, 1 Museum Drive, nassaumuseum.org (516) 484-9337.

WESTBURY Hicks Nurseries Family Fun at Hicks Nurseries. Activities for families and children, and Otto the Ghost appearing live and in the animated story “Otto’s Not-So-Scary Night.” Through Oct. 31. Free bring a nonperishable food item. Hicks Nurseries, 100 Jericho Turnpike. (516) 334-0066 hicksnurseries.com.

HUNTINGTON Cinema Arts Center “The British Invasion,” rare performances by British Invasion bands from 1962 to 1969. Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. $9 and $13. “Dogtooth,” drama by Yorgos Lanthimos. Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. $4.50 to $10. “A Disappearing Number,” new show presented by National Theater Live. Friday at 7:30 p.m. $20 and $25. “Found Footage Festival,” Nick Prueher and Joe Pickett return to Cinema Arts Centre with an all-new collection of found videos. Oct. 24 at 7 p.m. $10. Anything But Silent — Classics from the Silent Age: “The Man Who Laughs,” a silent horror film with live musical accompaniment by Ben Model on the cinema’s Miditzer theater organ. Oct. 26 at 7:30 p.m. $9 and $13. “Genius Within: The Inner Life of Glenn Gould,” screening followed by live conversation via Skype with co-directors Michèle Hozer and Peter Raymont. Oct. 27 at 7:30 p.m. $9 and $13. “Know Your Mushrooms,” directed by Ron Mann. Oct. 28 at 7:30 p.m. $9 and $13. Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Avenue. cinemaartscentre.org (800) 838-3006.

PORT WASHINGTON Sands-Willets House Movies at the Sands-Willets House: “Drums Along the Mohawk,” a 1939 John Ford classic about life during the Revolutionary War. Light refreshments will be served. Oct. 24 at 1 p.m. $3.50 and $7. Sands-Willets House, 336 Port Washington Boulevard. (516) 365-9074 cowneck.org.

SAG HARBOR Bay Street Theater Long Island Film Festival, featuring independent filmmakers. Oct. 26 through Oct. 30. $10. Bay Street Theater, Main and Bay Streets. baystreet.org (631) 725-9500.

Music and Dance

BAY SHORE Boulton Center for the Performing Arts Howard Jones, singer/songwriter. Friday at 8 p.m. $45 and $50. Chris Hillman, country rock. Oct. 23 at 8 p.m. $35 and $40. David Sanborn Trio featuring Joey DeFrancesco. Oct. 29 at 8 p.m. $55 and $60. Boulton Center for the Performing Arts, 37 West Main Street. (631) 969-1101 boultoncenter.org.

BLUE POINT Bayport-Blue Point Public Library Anne Taffel, pianist. Oct. 17 at 2 p.m. Free. Bayport-Blue Point Public Library, 203 Blue Point Avenue. bprt.suffolk.lib.ny.us (631) 363-6133.

BRIGHTWATERS Bay Shore-Brightwaters Public Library Afiara String Quartet of Canada. Oct. 24 at 3 p.m. $10 and $12. Bay Shore-Brightwaters Public Library, 1 South Country Road. bayshore.suffolk.lib.ny.us (631) 665-4350.

BROOKVILLE Tilles Center for the Performing Arts Pat Metheny: The Orchestrion Tour, jazz. Thursday at 8 p.m. $32 to $67. Marvin Hamlisch and Michael Feinstein in “Two Gentlemen of Broadway.” Oct. 23 at 8 p.m. $52 to $102. Tilles Center for the Performing Arts, 720 Northern Boulevard. tillescenter.org (516) 299-3100.

GARDEN CITY Adelphi University Performing Arts Center Taylor 2, dance. Through Oct. 29. $20. “The Thalia Follies: A Political Cabaret,” featuring songs, sketches, and satire. Oct. 24 at 2 p.m. $20 and $30. Adelphi University Performing Arts Center, 1 South Avenue. (516) 877-4000

HEMPSTEAD Monroe Lecture Center Theater, Hofstra University The American Chamber Ensemble Fall Concert. A performance of “Woman in Darkness,” composed by Hofstra University’s Herbert Deutsch to text by Virginia Terris. Oct. 17 at 3 p.m. $12 and $15. OctubaFest 2010. Student and faculty solo performances followed by a performance by the Hofstra Tuba and Euphonium Ensemble. Oct. 23 at 8 p.m. Free. Monroe Lecture Center Theater, Hofstra University, South Campus, California Avenue. (516) 463-6644 hofstra.edu.

HEMPSTEAD Nassau Coliseum Muse, rock/pop. Oct. 23 at 7:30 p.m. $53.50 to $76.55. Nassau Coliseum, 1255 Hempstead Turnpike. (516) 794-9300 nassaucoliseum.com.

HUNTINGTON Last Licks Cafe, Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Huntington The Queazles, a five-man rock ’n’ roll band. Oct. 23 at 7:30 p.m. $10 to $15. Last Licks Cafe, Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Huntington, 109 Browns Road. (631) 427-9547 lastlickscafe.org.

HUNTINGTON Old First Church Misha and Cipa Dichter, pianists. Oct. 24 at 4 p.m. $20. Old First Church, 125 East Main Street. ridotto.org (631) 385- 0373.

OLD WESTBURY DeSeversky Conference Center “Schumann Birthday Fantasy Concert,” with performance by Chamber Players International. Oct. 17 at noon. $60 includes Champagne brunch. DeSeversky Conference Center, Northern Boulevard. nyit.edu/resources/restaurant (516) 686-7675.

PATCHOGUE Patchogue Theater for the Performing Arts “Frank Sinatra. The Song Is You. ” featuring Tom Postilio and His Orchestra. Oct. 17 at 3 p.m. $25 to $49. Hammer of the Gods, Led Zeppelin tribute band. Oct. 23 at 8 p.m. $27 to $47. The Third Patchogue Arts Festival, featuring visual artists, poets, performers and singer-songwriters. Oct. 24, noon to 8 p.m. Free. The Glenn Miller Orchestra, jazz. Oct. 30 at 8 p.m. $25 to $55. Patchogue Theater for the Performing Arts, 71 East Main Street. (631) 207-1313 patchoguetheatre.com.

STONY BROOK Charles B. Wang Center Magnetic North, Taiyo Na, and Tina Kim, a program featuring up-and-coming Asian-American performers. Oct. 28 at 7 p.m. $10 to $35. Hours: Mondays through Fridays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. or by appointment. Charles B. Wang Center, Stony Brook University. (631) 632-6320 sunysb.edu/sb/wang.

WESTHAMPTON BEACH Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center Hugh Masekela, world music. Oct. 17 at 8 p.m. $40 to $70. Buddy Guy, blues. Oct. 30 at 8 p.m. $75 to $125. Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, 76 Main Street. whbpac.org (631) 288-1500.

SEA CLIFF United Methodist Church of Sea Cliff “Pumpkin Patch Fund-Raiser,” featuring thousands of pumpkins for sale. Through Oct. 31. Sundays through Fridays, noon to 6:30 p.m., and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. United Methodist Church of Sea Cliff, corner of Carpenter and Downing Avenues. (516) 671-9392.

Spoken Word

PORT WASHINGTON Jeanne Rimsky Theater An Evening with Patrick McEnroe and Mary Carillo. Patrick McEnroe, tennis player, coach and ESPN commentator, will share his experiences in sports in an interview with Mary Carillo, sportscaster and former tennis player. Oct. 27 at 7:30 p.m. Free. Jeanne Rimsky Theater, 232 Main Street. landmarkonmainstreet.org (516) 767-6444.

PORT WASHINGTON Sands-Willets House “Lecture Series: A Shared Aesthetic, Artists of Long Island’s North Fork,” with Geoff Fleming, director of the Southold Historical Society Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. $4 and $8. Sands-Willets House, 336 Port Washington Boulevard. (516) 365-9074 cowneck.org.

RIVERHEAD East End Arts Council Gallery Talk by Annie Wildey and Allan Bull, 2 ll’s ok? also, on line it looks as if he is a former artist in residence and she is a current one. I have a call into them. William Steeple Davis Artists in Residence. Monday at 7 p.m. $20. East End Arts Council Gallery, 133 East Main Street. (631) 727-0900 eastendarts.org.

EAST FARMINGDALE Arena Players Main Stage Theater “The Bermuda Avenue Triangle,” by Renee Taylor and Joseph Bologna. Through Oct. 31. $20 and $25. Arena Players Main Stage Theater, 296 Route 109. (516) 293-0674 arenaplayers.org.

EAST HAMPTON Guild Hall The Naked Stage presents “Extremities,” a dramatic reading by William Mastrosimone. Oct. 26 at 7:30 p.m. Free. Guild Hall, 158 Main Street. (631) 324-4050 guildhall.org.

EAST ISLIP BayWay Arts Center “Phantom,” musical. Through Oct. 24. $14 to $20. BayWay Arts Center, 265 East Main Street. (631) 581-2700 broadhollow.org.

ELMONT BroadHollow Theater “All My Sons,” by Arthur Miller. Through Oct. 31. $14 to $25. BroadHollow Theater, 700 Hempstead Turnpike. (516) 775-4420 broadhollow.org.

HEMPSTEAD John Cranford Adams Playhouse “Cabaret,” musical with book by Joe Masteroff, lyrics by Fred Ebb and music by John Kander. Friday through Oct. 31. $12 and $15. John Cranford Adams Playhouse, Hofstra University, South Campus. (516) 463-6644 hofstra.edu.

LINDENHURST Studio Theater “Love, Sex and the I.R.S.,” comedy by William Van Zandt and Jane Milmore. Through Oct. 30. $14 to $20. Studio Theater, 141 South Wellwood Avenue. (631) 226-8400 studiotheatreli.com.

MERRICK The Stage Theater “Ring of Fire.” Musical based on the music of Johnny Cash. Through Oct. 17. $16 and $20. The Stage Theater, 2222 Hewlett Avenue. thestageinmerrick.com (516) 868-6400.

NEW HYDE PARK Herricks Community Players “Laughter on the 23rd Floor,” comedy by Neil Simon. Friday through Oct. 31. $17 and $22. Herricks Community Players, 999 Herricks Road. (516) 742-1926.

NORTHPORT Bare Bones Theater Co. “Play It Again, Sam,” by Woody Allen. Thursday through Nov. 6. $20. Bare Bones Theater Company, 57 Main Street. (800) 838-3006

NORTHPORT John W. Engeman Theater “My Fair Lady,” musical with book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe. Through Oct. 31. $60. John W. Engeman Theater, 250 Main Street. johnwengemantheater.com (631) 261-2900.

OAKDALE CM Performing Arts Center “The Secret Garden,” based on the 1909 novel of the same name by Frances Hodgson Burnett. Oct. 17 through Nov. 12. $16 and $22. “The Rocky Horror Show,” musical by Richard O’Brien. Oct. 23 through Nov. 13. $20. CM Performing Arts Center, 931 Montauk Highway. (631) 218-2810 cmpac.com.

PORT JEFFERSON Theater Three “Dracula: The Musical,” music by Frank Wildhorn, book and lyrics by Don Black and Christopher Hampton. Through Oct. 30. $21 to $28. Theater Three, 412 Main Street. theaterthree.com (631) 928-9100.

QUOGUE Hampton Theater Company ,Quogue Community Hall “Rabbit Hole,” drama by David Lindsay-Abaire. Thursday through Nov. 7. $10 to $25. Hampton Theater Company, Quogue Community Hall, 126 Jessup Avenue. (631) 653-8955 hamptontheatre.org.

Museums and Galleries

EAST HAMPTON Guild Hall “Cities of Peace,” an exhibition focusing on cities that have experienced major conflict and trauma, including Jerusalem, Baghdad, Kabul, Beijing, Hiroshima, New York and Lhasa. Oct. 23 through Jan. 16. Guild Hall, 158 Main Street. (631) 324-4050 guildhall.org.

EAST HAMPTON Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center “Jackson and Lee, August 1953: Photographs by Tony Vaccaro.” Through Oct. 30. $10 members, children under 12 and CUNY and SUNY students, free. Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, 830 Springs-Fireplace Road. (631) 324-4929 stonybrook.edu/pkhouse.

EAST HAMPTON Solar “El Dorado,” an exhibition of paintings, works on paper and wall drawings by the Brooklyn artist Vargas-Suarez Universal. Through Oct. 25. By appointment only. Solar, 44 Davids Lane. (631) 907-8422 artsolar.com.

EAST ISLIP Islip Art Museum “Story Time,” an exhibition highlighting the ways artists tell stories through contemporary devices like avatars, virtual alter egos and cartoons. Through Nov. 14. Suggested donation, $3. Wednesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays, noon to 4 p.m. Islip Art Museum, 50 Irish Lane. (631) 224-5402 islipartmuseum.org.

GREAT NECK Great Neck Arts Center “Plunderland,” an installation by Herb Williams using more than a half-million Crayola crayons. Through Nov. 29. Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesdays, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Great Neck Arts Center, 113 Middle Neck Road. greatneckarts.org (516) 829-2570.

HEMPSTEAD Guthart Cultural Center Theater, Joan and Donald E. Axinn Library “75 Stories for 75 Years,” exhibition drawn from the University Archives collection. Through Feb. 4. David Filderman Gallery, Joan and Donald E. Axinn Library, Hofstra University, South Campus. (516) 463-6644

HEMPSTEAD Hofstra University Museum “Acquired Riches: Highlights from the Hofstra University Museum Collection.” Through Dec. 17. Hours: Tuesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, 1 to 5 p.m. Hofstra University Museum, 112 Hofstra University. hofstra.edu/museum (516) 463-5672.

HUNTINGTON Conklin house Gallery “From House Calls to Hospitals,” a time line of health care providers from the 18th to the 20th centuries in Huntington, as well as the history of Huntington Hospital during the 1920s. Through December. $3 to $5. Thursdays, Fridays and Sundays, 1 to 4 p.m. Conklin House Gallery, 2 High Street. (631) 427-7045

HUNTINGTON Fotofoto Gallery “Great Lengths,” solo exhibition featuring works by Alli Rufrano. Through Oct. 24. Fridays, 5 to 9 p.m. Saturdays, noon to 9 p.m. Sundays, noon to 5 p.m. Fotofoto Gallery, 372 New York Avenue. (631) 549-0448 fotofotogallery.com.

HUNTINGTON Heckscher Museum of Art “Rock On! Masterworks of Rock Photography,” an exhibition featuring about 55 images of rock ‘n’ roll musicians. Through Jan. 9. “Night on the Town,” images of night life. Through Jan. 2. $4 to $6 children under 10, free. Hours: Wednesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Heckscher Museum of Art, 2 Prime Avenue. (631) 351-3250 heckscher.org.

RIVERHEAD Suffolk County Historical Society “Helen M. Kroeger and Otto J. Kurth: The Anchorage Studio and Peconic Bay Impressionism,” exhibition about the artists and their relationship with the North Fork art community. Through Oct. 30. Tuesdays through Saturdays, 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Suffolk County Historical Society, 300 West Main Street.

suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org (631) 727-2881.

ROSLYN HARBOR Nassau County Museum of Art “2D/3D: Paintings by Keith Mayerson, Sculpture by Kent Henricksen.” Through Jan. 9. $4 to $10 children under 5 and members, free. “For Us the Living,” works by Mort Künstler about the Civil War. Through Jan. 9. $4 to $10 children under 5 and members, free. “Burt Young: Paintings,” works by a painter, author and actor known for his work in the “Rocky” film series. Through Oct. 31. $4 to $10 children under 5 and members, free. Tuesdays through Sundays, 11 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Nassau County Museum of Art, 1 Museum Drive. nassaumuseum.org (516) 484-9337.

SEA CLIFF The Box Gallery “James Fischetti = Veronique Leriche Fischetti,” an exhibition featuring a selection of paintings and digital collages, Saturday and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m., and by appointment seven days a week. Through Oct. 17. The Box Gallery, 256 Sea Cliff Avenue. (516) 676-0505.

SHELTER ISLAND Boltax.Gallery “Good-Bye,” paintings by Don Florence. Through Oct. 31. Fridays through Mondays, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Boltax.Gallery, 21 North Ferry Road. boltaxgallery.com (631) 749-4062.

SOUTHAMPTON Parrish Art Museum “American Still Life: Treasures from the Parrish Art Museum.” More than 40 works from the museum’s permanent collection, from 1871 to the present. Through Nov. 28. Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays 1 to 5 p.m. Parrish Art Museum, 25 Job’s Lane. (631) 283-2118 parrishart.org.

SOUTHAMPTON Southampton Cultural Center “Autumn Light,” focusing on light and its seasonal effect on the East End landscape. Through Oct. 31. Southampton Cultural Center, 25 Pond Lane. (631) 287-4377


Where To Pick Your Own Berries On Long Island

Lewin Farms in Calverton has a selection of U-Pick berries. (Credit: Lewin Farms)

One of the joys of living on Long Island is the bounty of fresh produce grown locally at Long Island farms. This time of year, sweet corn, juicy tomatoes and ripe zucchini is readily available to purchase at area farm stands, but there is something so satisfying about harvesting your own.

Long Island farms are offering U-Pick blackberries, raspberries and other crops this summer. Here is a guide to local farms that let you pick your own produce.

Note: These farms are following proper COVID-19 safety precautions at the stands and in the fields.

Lewin Farms

812 Sound Ave., Calverton, NY 11933

In Season U-Pick: Raspberries, blueberries, blackberries, peaches, pumpkins (in the fall).

Hours: The farm stand is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day except Tuesday. Call each day for a U-Pick schedule.

Garden of Eve

4558 Sound Ave., Riverhead, NY 11901

In Season: Blueberries, blackberries. Additional U-Pick produce available later in the year.

Hours: Open daily from April 1 through Halloween, from 9 a.m. to 6.pm.

Lenny Bruno Farms

740 Wading River Rd., Manorville,
NY 11949

In Season U-Pick: U-Pick typically starts in early-mid August and includes bell peppers, long hots, cheese peppers, hot cherry peppers, sweet cherry peppers, fryers, white peppers, plum tomatoes, beefsteak tomatoes, black eggplant, little finger eggplant, flat beans and pumpkins (in the fall).

Hours: Open to the public 7 days a week from May through November.

Patty’s Berries & Bunches

410 Sound Ave., Mattituck, NY 11952

In Season: Blueberries, raspberries, blackberries (in August)

Hours: Farm stand opens daily from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. with U-pick ending at 5:30 p.m. Call ahead for U-Pick availability.

Wickham’s Fruit Farm

28700 Main Rd., Cutchogue, NY 11935

In Season: Raspberries, blueberries, blackberries. Additional U-Pick produce available later in the year.


600 Pumpkins Disappear in Long Island, New York - Recipes

As reported in the Salem News (A local multi town news paper for the Topsfield/north of Boston area) for Sept 7th 2007 ---- "Many know the fair for its midway rides, games, fried dough, Italian sausages and the All-New England Giant Pumpkin Weigh-Off with its monster orange beasts. Last year's record fair winner tipped the scales at 1,347.5 pounds and was carted here from Rhode Island by Ron Wallace.

You can catch the weigh-off at 9 a.m. Sept. 29.

The winning pumpkin this year will be on display throughout the fair in an air-conditioned glass case in the Vegetable Building after being weighed. The grand prize is $3,500, but O'Brien said whoever wins the contest will get to pick one of 50 envelopes for a chance at $10,000.

The "scuttlebutt" is there are some mammoth pumpkins headed Topsfield's way, O'Brien said." (O'Brien is the head of the Topsfield Fair)

A chance at 10 grand aint to shabby!!

I've heard that all of the top 5 pumpkins will have to stay for the display, not just the winner. true? (Not that I'll have to worry. ).

1st place is in the usual veggie barn display. 2nd thu 5th place are in a new display for the fair gowers to view. If you want to collect the prize money yes the pumpkins will have to stay. The fair wants people to see the pumpkins. One big issue we have been hearing thru feedback is people come to the fair to see the big pumpkins but they are already gone. Obviously this is do to the fact we weigh off early Saturday morning and fair goers on Monday never get to see them. This is the fairs way of letting more fair gowers see some huge specimens and hopefully help spread the hobby. The Fair people have constructed a protected area for the display to take place.

Could you tell me what the rest of the prize structure is?
And where exactly is this?

Topsfield is north of Boston, MA. At least that is a start.

Joe (and everyone else), for a map of all the GPC sites, copy and paste this address:

you'll need a connection faster than dialup, but these locations are precise, and you can even get directions from your home address to the site using this map.

and everyone thought Joe only had one big one going this year. heh heh

Topsfield is a all New England Weigh Off. Meaning only fruit grown in New England can compete. You must be a member of the NEGPGA to participate in the cash prizes.

Wrong. they are a GPC site which means anyone can come and weigh a pumpkin or squash. Somebody please correct me if I am wrong..once you become GPC. that means you take any and all comers who grow. is this not the way it is ?
DAN CARLSON

I believe they would be welcome to GPC winnings(after all is tabulated) but not Topsfield Fair winnings.

Dan is correct as far as GPC prize money goes.

hello john,, i will be going , save me some, dough boys lol, hope to see you there.
frank

Dan you are correct when it comes to a GPC cash prize pay out. But as far as the other monies go you are incorrect. The prize structure is by the NEGPGA and the Topsfield Fair. If you want to be elligible for that money you need to have a pumpkin grown in a New England state.

John (5150) -- NEGPGA director

Is this the only contest in the country that discriminates "outsiders"? Just doesn't sound right. And also, if this is the case, do you do seed auctions and seed raffles on bigpumpkins.com? If you do, you should let people know that you do not allow outsiders at your contest (atleast for the prize monies that they helped raise with auctions and raffles). My 2 cents. Hate to sound harsh, but I have never heard of a contest that didnt allow everyone to compete.

Sorry you feel that way Rock

Dont get me wrong, I have followed Topsfield for many years and always am impressed with the quality fruits and competitions that go on up there. Great people, super competitiors, but it is suprises me that in all of these years I have never heard of the "New England only" rule for prize structure. I wish you and the Topsfield weigh off only the best.

article 1 weigh-off sites and club/group 11 a states

all gpc santioned weigh-offs are open to anyone wishing to participate without prejudice. all growers must comply with all rules and regulations set forth at the gpc they wish to participate in. any rules the gpc site wishes to have must be fair and impartial for all growers wishing to participate

without predudice means just that. far and impartial for all growers wishing to participate means just that.

it is in direct conflict with the gpc charter rules to deny prize money to anyone in competition. its also very unfair.

the spirit of our rules were to be impartial and fair with anyone wishing to attend aand compete at any gpc site --to meet the sites/clubs rules was written with regard to any membership fees was our intention.
the spirit of the rules was not intended to deny payout to certain growers based on where they live.

the sponsor needs to be made aware of this and rethink their stand on this issue. besides why would you not honor your biggest pumpkin ? no matter where it was grown?

this is not a slap at the nepga because i have a lot of friends in that organization and was also a former director.

its the fair who pays the prize money and wishes to set there own rules however, by the same token topsfielf fair must follow the gpc rules should they wish to participate.

dick wallace
gpc excommittee

And I was going to bring one of mine.
Oh well,
Eddy

In regards to the 24th annual "All New New England Giant Pumpkin Weigh Off" sponsored by the by the Topsfield Fair and the NEGPGA.

After careful consideration and consultation of the GPC rules and the Topsfield Fair/NEGPGA rules the directors of the NEGPGA and the GPC site cordinator interpret the rules as follows.

1 -- The 24th annual "All New England Giant Puumpkin Weigh Off" has always been an all New England weigh off as the name states since it's inception.

2-- This rule interpritation has not changed since the NEGPGA and the Topsfield Fair orginization has been a active participant within the GPC.

3 -- ALL pumpkins are welcome to weigh off at the Topsfield Fairs 24th annual All New England Giant Pumpkin Weigh Off and are elliglible for GPC prizes.

4 -- In order to qualify for NEGPGA/Topsfield fair prizes, pumpkins must be grown in one of the New England states and you must also be a member of the NEGPGA.

5 -- GPC Article I Weigh off sites and club/groups

"The GPC gives each site the flexibility to have prize money and payouts as they chose".

Any guestions please contact GPC site cordinator George Hoomis @ 978-356-0117

the president of the gpc has been notified and will be in touch with george.

Every weighoff site that I have been to has never cared where the pumpkins came from, they wanted the biggest possible fruit to showcase. In fact, I even went to one site that bragged that they got a grower to come all the way from NY to their contest.

I believe the "intent" of the payout flexibility mainly concerned those who wanted to merge pumpkin and squash payouts, farthest distance traveled prize, or the state or local record breaking bonuses. Not to exclude growers from the main prize schedule.

How is Topsfields payout guidlines for NE growers any different from Cooperstown's "Otsego county bonus" or Ontario's Bruce-Grey" type payouts? Is it just the way they phrase the winnings. a different way to protect the interests of the locals?
Personally. I think a competition amongs growers within a reasonably same weather environment is much more competitive and ultimately shows who's da man? Didn't wieghoffs always have "regions" to prevent the better growing regions from travelling mostly south to sweep less- friendly regions wieghoffs?.

By less-friendly im talking about growing environments. not people. lol.

The Bruce-Grey is a completely separate (non-GPC) weighoff held the day after the GPC main event.

The Otsego county payout is significantly smaller than the main prize schedule for cooperstown, as there hasn't been (from memory) a pumpkin over 600 pounds from otsego county yet. I guess in that case, it's a way of keeping the local growers (and chamber of commerce) happy and involved.

AHHH its amazing how much things change but really stay the same

So I guess Topsfield is not receptive to outsiders must have there own little click out there. I guess you can only grow giants in New England. Sounds like to me that want to keep the money local but also want everyone to bring there big ones there. Just my opinion

Colo.Spgs.CO. Pikes Peak Chapter @ [email protected]

Gosh I wish some good ol folk from back east would attend our colorado weighoff. it may take a 1000 pounder to take first place LOL, but the money would be yours. Does not matter where you came from, as the big fruit wins under GPC rules takes the pot as long as it is sound and solid under the rules. We would welcome a grower that drove over a 1000+ miles and days of driving to weigh in. Just the plain old boring colorado truth. Happy weighing, JK

All, I have discussed this issue with the NEGPGA. Topsfield Fair will be open to all growers wishing to have their fruit officially weighed for GPC recognition. As far as prize money only New England residents are eligible for monetary pay outs. The NEGPGA receives it's prize money from the Topsfield Fair and the Topsfield Fair decides who to pay or not.

The Topsfield Fair is a charter member of the GPC and has been a valued weigh-off site scince the GPC's inception. This issue will be revisited in the winter with the Topsfield Fair board and I feel confident a mutually acceptable agreement can be reached.


Pumpkin picking and apple cider doughnuts?

I usually go upstate to Barton Orchards for pumpkin picking. This place has the best apple cider doughnuts, stuff for the kids and plenty of pick your own veggies. I am looking for a place closer to home. (no further than Riverhead, I live in Queens) I would love to find a place that has stuff for the kids, pumpkins or apples and cider doughnuts. Any ideas? Google Barton orchards in Poughquag NY, This is what I am looking for closer to home.

Riverhead isnt very far - I think most place will be farther and likely on the north fork.

Www.ediblelongisland.com has articles about both apple picking & cider doughnuts on their main webpage.

In addition as you drive the main road east from Riverhead (not too far) you will see many many pumpkin farms complete with corn mazes, farm stands, hay rides, & everything that you would expect to see in the fall. Be prepared for slow traffic on weekends, as fall has become a very popular time to visit the North Fork.

By the way, you will also pass or see signs leading to many wineries. Enjoy!

There are some places in Nassau County and closer in Suffolk listed here, but have no idea how good they are.

Thanks, everyone, I have looked at all of these places. I was hoping someone knew of a certain place.

There are so many places that it's hard to say that one or the other is *best*.

Most people plan to spend the whole day & drive the quaint roads headed east, stopping when something looks interesting. Harvest Farm has several different locations. the article mentions them. Also Wickhams Farm has been around for years & years. it's a fruit farm, so you could definitely pick apples there.

Harbes is a big one out on the north fork. I would just plan a drive on sound ave and stop at what looks interesting. So many places out there.

OMG. I hate spell check! Sorry. I meant Harbes in my post #5. Thanks for the correction, shoney

After your post I realized I'd never tasted apple cider donuts. So I bought some at the Milk Pail in a Watermill yesterday. What a huge letdown. Not much flavor at all. I really don't get the pumpkin picking craze either. but then it,m not a kid. The HOARDS of people at the pumpkin patch in Watermill yesterday were epic. Good luck!

Update. We went to White Post Farms in Melville. It was very crowed and it cost $21.00 to enter. They had a lot of shows. We choose not to pay. This was a place to take the whole family and spend the day. We had 3 adults and a 3 year old and just wanted pumpkins. We then found schmitts about 5 minutes away. No charge to enter, plenty of pumpkins and other veggies to pick. Big area for kids to play. Perfect for what we wanted. Except the doughnuts. Not nearly as good as upstate NY. I guess for the doughnuts I will have to drive.


Where is the Cilley Hill Pumpkin Festival

This isn’t a quick and easy trip for me and I rack up a little over 450 miles round trip, all in one day! The Cilley Hill Pumpkin Festival happens in Jericho Vermont each Oct. 30-31. My Route to get there is heading up 93 to Vermont 89 and you can get off at exit 11 heading North and catch Route 117 North to Skunk Hollow Road (I know right. ) and take that into Jericho Center. Catch Route 15 East to Cilley Hill Rd and you will see Pumpkins come into view.

You can also take the next exit onto 2A to Route 15 and head east or if you miss that one take the exit for Route 15 and head, well you get the idea. When you come to Cilley Hill Road your turn on to it and in a short distance (1,600 feet) you will come to the Brown River. (the picture at the top is the dam right next to the road) and here is where you will start to see the pumpkins depending on when you arrive. There is no parking so most people will drive-by slowly or on nice evenings, walk up from Route 15.


600 Pumpkins Disappear in Long Island, New York - Recipes

Republicans passed a law in Georgia if you give a voter a drink of water while waiting in line to vote it’s against the law punishable with up to a year in jail! What constitutional amendment does that violate?

I just want to know why it doesnt violate the law to have a partisan & possibly foreign software company (Dominion) tally the votes.

Its called buying a vote no matter how small the cost of water is

I agree roger80, a year is too much! At least a week. If you know you’re going to stand in a long line to vote you would think common sense would say bring you’re own snacks and water. And it’s not “if you hand out water”, it’s specifically targeted to third party groups handing out water. A third party is any party contending for votes that failed to outpoll either of its two strongest rivals.

The water isn’t the most important part of the bill. You conveniently forgot to mention that this bill imposed identification requirements for mail in ballots. We all want more confidence in the legitimacy of our elections don’t we? As long as we have this implied lawlessness of our current election system we will never feel confident in our election system. Well, unless your candidate wins then you’re confident. Loopholes for potential voter fraud need to close and voter ID laws need to be employed. Surely you see that, otherwise you are promoting the potential for voter fraud. This is applied to both Democrats and Republicans.

On top of Brush Mountain, Pa.

Obviously he won. The question that will never ho away is, did he win fairly?

Yes Garden Rebel . Drivers license or Social Insurance Number in Canada . Drivers License or Social Security Number in The US . Why would you argue that ?

If restrictions are going to be put on voting in the name of protecting against fraud, the people making restrictions should first demonstrate the existence of widespread, result-changing fraud. A case of someone double voting here or there is inconsequential.

any fraud is wrong, voter id is fair to everyone and it makes people accountable, why would anyone not want this? unless they plan on cheating.

Well said cjb, absolutely no existence of widespread fraud. We will see how Dominion Voting Systems make out with their defamation law suits even with Trump’s supreme court nominations, especially after the Supreme Court allowed his tax returns to be released! LOL

Paradise Mountain, New York

Biden Won! That's the BIGGEST Joke of the American People. The Democrats rigged the election so Mr.Joke Biden could win to destroy America and make the American people pay for believing we were a great country. As time goes by, the people with blinders on will see the Democrats are following Hilter's ways of doing things

I was a construction inspector for 38 years. If I'm offered 10 grand to pass a person's inspection its a bribe punishable by jailtime. If I accept a cup of coffee at the coffee truck by the contractor and pass his work it can be considered a bribe punishable by jail time. Leave it to a democrat on the run from today's realities to stretch any topic to its rediculous end to try and deflect.

Bullshit! No fool would pass an inspection for a cup of coffee. Boy you guys really have to stretch reality to justify your rasict voter laws.

Better yet tell me why in the hell voters are made to stand in line for hours to vote? It amazes me how these GOP controlled states are allowed to pass laws without any proof they're needed. Just speculation, you know the kind Trump peddled. You know you remember he won the election but it was stolen from him.
Bullshit!
When The Supreme Court overturned the voting rights act the pre clearance part this was bound to happen. Remember they're justification we had just elected a black president surely there is no racism left in this country. Boy did they get that one wrong.

My voting station is right down the road at the church. How many Church's in Georgia have polling stations at black churches?

There ought to be a mandatory drug screening for everyone who wishes to vote 4 commander & chief of armed forces. You wouldnt want to be on an airliner where the pilot was t sober. Only sober peoples vote should count when it comes to who will control nuclear weapons.

Myself and a whole bunch of other people. should NOT be allowed to vote :)

Spuds how is voter ID racist . Waiting for that justification. We need to show some sort of Id for almost everything else in life.

This current administration, like a drum beat, constantly implies that blacks are disadvantaged. That includes that they are not capable of voting or producing ID therefore it’s not required. That somehow they are victims of white America. This is the new slavery, the government insisting black community’s and families continue to be dependent on the government from birth. The Democrat party depends on this. This Democratic approach is racism, but fortunately people are opening their eyes.

Can someone explain to me why anyone should have to wait in line for hours to vote?

It’s run by the same agency that runs the Dept. of Motor Vehicles? Not sure, my state is only vote by mail, ha!

Has anyone read the law, anyone? If you did, there would be no posts. This is the kind of non sense that happens. Someone claims something outlandish in a bill that is not true by twisting the truth. Bill allows anyone to donate water or food to the actual polling station to help people. Bill allows polling station workers to hand out water or food if needed. Bill allows the state to actually develop more polling stations if there are polling places that have too many people waiting in line to help fix the problem. What the bill doesn't allow is someone who is not a poll worker to come and hand out things to people which is voter bribing. Almost every state has this law which is common sense. This Bill actually tries to fix the problem of long lines. Read the bill and stop listening to people twisting the truth.

On top of Brush Mountain, Pa.

Why do people have to wait in line so long to vote?

Because the voting process is slow.

Now the crybabies cry about lines. Why are there lines at Disney World? Why are there lines at the DMV. Why are there lines at bathrooms when you have to take a shit? Why is there a line to see Santa? Why are there lines to get groceries? Why are there lines to get prescriptions?

On top of Brush Mountain, Pa.

There are lines in hospital emergency rooms too but shouldn't something be done about these things. I waited in long lines in the army too. But there no one gave a shit about it because we were just dog meat anyway. Are voters dog meat? And would there be lines if you could vote by mail? You can't go to Disney by mail or any of those other places. But you can vote by mail.

Why did the all republican Texas Supreme Court uphold order limiting Texas counties to only one drop-off location for voters to hand deliver their absentee ballots during the pandemic?

If it ain't racism then it's voter suppression disenfranchisement. You only have to look at who's targeted. It's no secret how certain demographics of people vote easy to target them now ain't it. Either way it's shameful what the GOP's trying to do.

Im the past five years verything the Democrat/left wing media has been critical of.. has been a direct deflection away from their own sins.

Did Bill Clinton accuse Ken star of being a sex addict? No but somewhere in the past 20 years people have become stuck in very single minded ruts. I'm sure you could see hypocrisy in the blind eye Democrats have turned towards election integrity. We'll see how the Arizona recount goes.

Did Obama accuse Trump of being a whore bait? He paid $130,000 to porn star Stormy Daniels.

I agree roger, $130,000 is way too much. What a sucker.

The left doesn't even like Biden they just hate Trump.

Under Trump the ultra rich got much richer, it did not trickle down the deficit sky rocketed, Under Biden the lower and middle class will get their share and so will the government get theirs in the end. He will, given enough time make America respectable again, creating jobs investing in infrastructure and green technology and making large companies pay more than zero federal taxes. If you make less than $400,000 a year you should vote for Biden next election.

Fake news & empty promises. The only thing that will trickle down under Biden is inflation. Real wages wont rise. Wall street doesnt want that. And if Biden stood up to Wall Street they would throw him under the bus just like they did Trump.
Always vote/ stand up for whoever is being thrown under the bus!

The GOP are the party of obstruction period! They got things put in the recovery act only to bitch about every thing else. Then they voted against the bill. If I were the Dems I wouldn't allow any GOP amendments unless they made a promise to vote for the bill.

They wish. They cant obstruct anything they are not in the majority.

Eliminate the filibuster and see what happens

Eliminate the debt cap too. Let's take this credit card to the Casino. woo hoo!

Is there anyone here who still believes that Trump won the election? And, if you do, why?

There are over 1000 affidavits signed and saying there was all out Voter fraud against Trump they saw it.
The diaper wearer Biden is against the Georgia voting
law,he does not want anyone to have to produce an id
to vote just send a ballot in. He knows this was one of the ways he cheated the system and won.

Who shot Kennedy & why? Who kidnapped & killed Charles Lindberg's son & why? Who stole the election & why? & Mant more.

I doubt you can understand. These things do happen.
When there is poo on your shoe. it may look like dirt but sure it doesnt smell great.

I doubt you can understand. These things do happen.
When there is poo on your shoe. it may look like dirt but sure it doesnt smell great.

If they hate Trump enough to run 100% negative coverage in Google news for a month before the election then 1) they are very powerful 2) they are capable and motivated to commit both the fraud and the coverup.

Who "they" is I dont know. but he pissed someone off really bad and it wasnt good hearted rural Americans, who are tired of being kicked around, slandered, and lied to!
That I do know.

Funny, how liberals are now for ending the filibuster when it was the only tool in their tool box during the second Reagan term and the first term of the 2000 Bush presidency.

Politics is a continual loop. If you eliminate the filibuster then four years from now you could give a conservative majority a blank check. Be careful what you ask for.

I think you guys drank the Kool-Aid.

If you already know you’re not going to like and agree with the the answers Uncanny, why would you ask a question like that in the first place? Then respond like that.

Just to see and try to understand the opinions of the other side and why. I might change my opinion if someone would give me a good reason to do so. Maybe you can do that?

I screenshots of the numbers changing in weird ways on election night. In my diary last year.

But if you wanted Biden to win it shouldnt matter at all to you.

Vote spikes favoring Biden still havent been explained. Trump did a video on it. Its prob. been banned now? Hard to find the info when its all censored huh?

Why didn't people question the results in 2016 when trump won? Dominion machines were used then also.

Media coverage was more favorable in 2016. Apparently no one cared if he won in 2016 or they didnt prep to steal it because they didnt believe he would win anyhow. In four years Trump had time to make enemies. He didnt make enemies with his base but I guess he pissed the media nd tech bigwigs off? Doesnt that seem obvious?

He pissed the FBI off apparently, too? Because they've twiddled their thumbs about leftist activity. They havent even identified the guy who threw the fire extinguisher at the stop the steal rally. Seems like they dont want to interfere with any of the orange-man-bad narratives!

The Supreme Court found no evidence of voter fraud, they dismissed multiple lawsuits, despite three of them being confirmed Trump nominees!

Well then I guess there was no fraud.

Uncanny, fair enough. I have never seen opinions change on this board. People don’t ponder different ideas or information, even if it was true. Minds are made up because we all have the answers. News is not like it used to be. Everything is tainted in politics where we really don’t know what is true or not. Many Democrat policies are so wrong, but so are Republican. The media will tell you who is right and who is wrong. Unfortunately too many people listen and don’t do their own research. Just know that everything you see whether you are on your phone, watching TV, or billboards are trying to change your mind.

My parents, grandparents, great grandparents fought in wars to make sure we remained free. Don’t ever forget, you have to fight for freedom and fight to keep it. It should never be taken for granted or it will disappear before you eyes. Ask you yourself, “Am I complacent”. You shouldn’t be. Young people today (in general) don’t have the same dedication to this country as in the past. Stuck on their phones, playing video games, looking for the easiest path. Don’t even know what the Pledge of Allegiance is. What it means. Don’t know the branches of government. Why is this? Ask yourself what political party would support this and why. What political party tries to support rights and freedom for all Americans? Uncanny, will you really understand opinions from the other side? You don’t have to understand, just respect that others have an opinion different than yours.

There are two paths. Some insecure people seek power as a route to freedom. these people end up with out-of-touch sociopathic behavior & ideas. Other insecure people seek freedom first & these people retain their healthy, natural & humble compassion.
There are two paths, I think, and seeking power is the path which can lead to our collective misery. Those who wrote the constitution would be appalled by the seeking of power (corruption).
They were very much concerned with seeking liberty.

So. back to the topic of voter laws the question is really whether the law helps free people remain free. or submissive people remain submissive. I can pack my own lunch and bring a water bottle and identification. That's not an act of submission. But letting people vote with no ID. that's an act of submission. This opens a Pandoras box of integrity/ illegitimacy questions. It's fake freedom.

On top of Brush Mountain, Pa.

Garden Rebel. I hear you. I have always supported this country. Have you fought for your country? Have you ever served? Hell, I am a combat veteran. I actually fought for it. But, to get back on topic, you did not really answer my question. You talked about a lot of things but never the answer to the question. I respect everyone's opinion, just want to know why they have that opinion, you included.

Thank you for your support, Marv. And thank you for your service. I have not been in the armed forces but would have been if called upon. I was to young at the time and did not feel the desire to be a volunteer

On top of Brush Mountain, Pa.

Garden Rebel, I apologize. Let's just agree that we don't agree. Nothing will change here. You have your opinion and I have mine. Let's all get back to growing something big. I am still trying to get past the 1000 pound mark. Maybe this year. I wish you good luck in your patch and I am hoping for the same in mine. God bless America.

You guys are all good people. As long as we can respectfully express our opinions on here I’m good. This is one of the few places left we can. Most of us will never meet and I wish you all the best.

I’m not growing this year. After all the Oregon fires last year I’m worried for this summer. After someone tried to set fire to our property during the fires I’m clearing brush and cutting trees.

Marv!, thank you for your service. I’m assuming it’s Vietnam. I lived in Guam as a child and remember the B-52s taking off and landing flying a hundred feet above our apartment. My dad was Korean War, and I grew up with him trying to convince me to go to college instead of going to war. “We wouldn’t be where we are today if I didn’t go to school”. So I went to school. My two boys have no interest in serving. The chain was broken. Marv, I can’t answer your question because I can admit I really don’t know. I do support mail in voting. It just needs to be done correctly.