Traditional recipes

The Daily Meal’s Guide to Thanksgiving Treats

The Daily Meal’s Guide to Thanksgiving Treats

Bring some sweets to your host or hostess this Turkey Day

Jane Bruce

Gear up for Thanksgiving with these confections!

If you’re not hosting the biggest eating holiday of the year this time around, you’re going to want to bring a gift. And whether that gift is a nice bottle of wine or a homemade pie, it’s the thought that counts.

We have to admit, though, we’re suckers for sweets, especially when they're gifts. With all of the wonderful flavors that fall brings — pumpkin, maple, pecan, etc. — these bites, from chocolates to macarons and even marshmallows, will make for a grand finale at your Thanksgiving dinner.

So flip through our favorite treat picks and see which tickle your sweet tooth, and then pick some up for a perfect host or hostess gift this year.

For more turkey talk, visit The Daily Meal's Guide to Thanksgiving!


Ariane Threads

Best Thanksgiving Themed Appetizer Recipes / Best Thanksgiving Appetizers - Food.com | Cheese ball . : More thanksgiving recipes at food.com.. From thanksgiving classics to modern new favorites, find test kitchen guaranteed recipes for hosting the best start preparing for thanksgiving now with our ultimate thanksgiving recipe collection. Just like a stuffed mushroom, this finger food has a delicious filling of bread crumbs, parmesan, and minced garlic. Pick from this list of thanksgiving side dish recipes, main dish ideas, desserts. Here are all the best thanksgiving recipes to add to your table! If you're serving a late dinner or.

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30 Of the Best Ideas for Thanksgiving themed Appetizers . from www.dinneratthezoo.com Appetizer recipes food recipes roundups thanksgiving recipes. But the overwhelming theme here? From nibbles to dips, we'll keep your gang from getting hangry on turkey day! Just like a stuffed mushroom, this finger food has a delicious filling of bread crumbs, parmesan, and minced garlic. I made these ahead of time, froze them wonderful little appetizers! This roasted carrots recipe makes extra dressing, which is good because you'll want to use it on your next burger, over broiled salmon, or in a grain salad. Best appetizers for thanksgiving from easy thanksgiving appetizers 11 simple recipes and ideas. Featuring vegan sides, appetizers, main meals & delicious dessert ideas for a whole menu.

Now readingthe best thanksgiving dinner recipes in the universe.

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What do you serve before thanksgiving dinner? These are the festive appetizers that will please any crowd and get your guests ready for the main. Thanksgiving appetizers thanksgiving fruit thanksgiving decorations food themes appetizers for kids thanksgiving kids 25 unbelievably good thanksgiving appetizer recipes. This hearty fall recipe from feasting at home is the satisfying start your thanksgiving feast begs for, complete with a savory filling made of seasonal goodness (think apples and pecans). Thanksgiving appetizer recipes is a group of recipes collected by the editors of nyt cooking.

33 Easy Thanksgiving Appetizers - Best Recipes for . from hips.hearstapps.com We had the best results when we first roasted the seeds until lightly toasted and then tossed them with egg white, which makes the seasonings stick, and cinnamon sugar. Get the recipe from delish. Featuring vegan sides, appetizers, main meals & delicious dessert ideas for a whole menu. Discover more thanksgiving recipes in our thanksgiving cocktail and drink recipes collection. Thanksgiving appetizer recipes is a group of recipes collected by the editors of nyt cooking. I made these ahead of time, froze them wonderful little appetizers! Try out this braided loaf from flour+spice. Thanksgiving appetizer recipes and easy cocktails to start the feast off right.

We had the best results when we first roasted the seeds until lightly toasted and then tossed them with egg white, which makes the seasonings stick, and cinnamon sugar.

Best thanksgiving themed appetizers from cuisine thanksgiving inspired appetizers. Now readingthe best thanksgiving dinner recipes in the universe. Dips are also really easy, especially as you can prepare them in advance. Just like a stuffed mushroom, this finger food has a delicious filling of bread crumbs, parmesan, and minced garlic. The best appetizers are definitely sweet + salty. I made them for a thanskgiving appetizer and everyone loved them. Melting the butter and mixing everything together, rather than cutting the butter into the flour, was a change i welcomed. Appetizer recipes food recipes roundups thanksgiving recipes. Plus, appetizer recipes from star chefs. One of the healthy thanksgiving appetizer recipes that you may consider in this holiday season. This roasted carrots recipe makes extra dressing, which is good because you'll want to use it on your next burger, over broiled salmon, or in a grain salad. But the overwhelming theme here? Here are all the best thanksgiving recipes to add to your table!

This recipe could easily be changed up to suit your taste. Melting the butter and mixing everything together, rather than cutting the butter into the flour, was a change i welcomed. Featuring vegan sides, appetizers, main meals & delicious dessert ideas for a whole menu. Best appetizers for thanksgiving from easy thanksgiving appetizers 11 simple recipes and ideas. Thanksgiving appetizers thanksgiving fruit thanksgiving decorations food themes appetizers for kids thanksgiving kids 25 unbelievably good thanksgiving appetizer recipes.

100 Best-Ever Party Appetizers | Appetizer recipes, Party . from i.pinimg.com Here are all the best thanksgiving recipes to add to your table! Use a mandoline with the shredder attachment, or slice it very thinly into planks and then crosswise into very thin strips. Most of these thanksgiving appetizers are easy to prepare, which means you. Tyler florence wraps brie in foil and bakes it in the oven for about 20 minutes, until the cheese is gooey like fondue. Dips are also really easy, especially as you can prepare them in advance. If you're serving a late dinner or. Appetizer recipes food recipes roundups thanksgiving recipes. Before you bring out the bird (find the best turkey preparation tips by downloading our complete guide), these deliciously simple recipes will keep the hungry crowd happy while you finish the meal.

So why not give them a little something and the best part:

From nibbles to dips, we'll keep your gang from getting hangry on turkey day! Use our menu of easy thanksgiving appetizers and side dish. Plus, appetizer recipes from star chefs. I made them for a thanskgiving appetizer and everyone loved them. Appetizers are way more fun to make and to eat (and eat, and eat). These thanksgiving appetizers are the perfect light bites to tide you over until it's time for the let's face it, people get hungry, especially on thanksgiving day. This hearty fall recipe from feasting at home is the satisfying start your thanksgiving feast begs for, complete with a savory filling made of seasonal goodness (think apples and pecans). What do you serve before thanksgiving dinner? From thanksgiving classics to modern new favorites, find test kitchen guaranteed recipes for hosting the best start preparing for thanksgiving now with our ultimate thanksgiving recipe collection. Best appetizers for thanksgiving from easy thanksgiving appetizers 11 simple recipes and ideas. Melting the butter and mixing everything together, rather than cutting the butter into the flour, was a change i welcomed. Best appetizers for thanksgiving from simple thanksgiving appetizers 3 ingre nt recipes. Over 75 of the best thanksgiving recipes all in one spot from appetizers, sides and desserts!

Dips are also really easy, especially as you can prepare them in advance. If not, here are our 50 best thanksgiving appetizer recipes (because options are essential!). What do you serve before thanksgiving dinner? Most of these thanksgiving appetizers are easy to prepare, which means you. This roasted carrots recipe makes extra dressing, which is good because you'll want to use it on your next burger, over broiled salmon, or in a grain salad.

Turkey is fine, but let's be honest: Just like a stuffed mushroom, this finger food has a delicious filling of bread crumbs, parmesan, and minced garlic. Fill up mushroom caps with the stuffing leftovers, sprinkle on a little cheese and pop them in the oven for a quick bite. If you're serving a late dinner or. These are the festive appetizers that will please any crowd and get your guests ready for the main.

If not, here are our 50 best thanksgiving appetizer recipes (because options are essential!). Each recipe is absolutely, undeniably delicious. Use our menu of easy thanksgiving appetizers and side dish. Featuring vegan sides, appetizers, main meals & delicious dessert ideas for a whole menu. (tom mccorkle for the washington post/food styling by lisa cherkasky for the washington post.)

I made these ahead of time, froze them wonderful little appetizers! Each recipe is absolutely, undeniably delicious. Fill up mushroom caps with the stuffing leftovers, sprinkle on a little cheese and pop them in the oven for a quick bite. It's easy to get caught up in planning the thanksgiving dinner and your dessert spread, so here's your friendly reminder to not forget the appetizers. Here are all the best thanksgiving recipes to add to your table!

(tom mccorkle for the washington post/food styling by lisa cherkasky for the washington post.) Which means its time for my annual thanksgiving round up which has grown from 25 to 50 to 75 thanksgiving recipes all from carlsbad cravings all in one place to make your. More thanksgiving recipes at food.com. Best thanksgiving themed appetizers from cuisine thanksgiving inspired appetizers. We had the best results when we first roasted the seeds until lightly toasted and then tossed them with egg white, which makes the seasonings stick, and cinnamon sugar.

This hearty fall recipe from feasting at home is the satisfying start your thanksgiving feast begs for, complete with a savory filling made of seasonal goodness (think apples and pecans). (via a pumpkin and a princess). Best appetizers for thanksgiving from easy thanksgiving appetizers 11 simple recipes and ideas. Turkey is fine, but let's be honest: These thanksgiving appetizers are the perfect light bites to tide you over until it's time for the let's face it, people get hungry, especially on thanksgiving day.

Pick from this list of thanksgiving side dish recipes, main dish ideas, desserts. Each recipe is absolutely, undeniably delicious. From nibbles to dips, we'll keep your gang from getting hangry on turkey day! Best appetizers for thanksgiving from simple thanksgiving appetizers 3 ingre nt recipes. Get the recipe from delish.

Use a mandoline with the shredder attachment, or slice it very thinly into planks and then crosswise into very thin strips. The best appetizers are definitely sweet + salty. Dips are also really easy, especially as you can prepare them in advance. Thanksgiving appetizers thanksgiving fruit thanksgiving decorations food themes appetizers for kids thanksgiving kids 25 unbelievably good thanksgiving appetizer recipes. Try out this braided loaf from flour+spice.

Looking for a thanksgiving appetizer that looks seriously impressive? These are the festive appetizers that will please any crowd and get your guests ready for the main. These fresh and healthy spins on the classics are absolutely full of flavor. Pick from this list of thanksgiving side dish recipes, main dish ideas, desserts. (tom mccorkle for the washington post/food styling by lisa cherkasky for the washington post.)

(via a pumpkin and a princess).

Get the recipe from delish.

Best appetizers for thanksgiving from easy thanksgiving appetizers 11 simple recipes and ideas.

Before you bring out the bird (find the best turkey preparation tips by downloading our complete guide), these deliciously simple recipes will keep the hungry crowd happy while you finish the meal.

Use our menu of easy thanksgiving appetizers and side dish.

Most of these thanksgiving appetizers are easy to prepare, which means you.

Include this thanksgiving appetizer recipes for delicious light bites that will set the mood this holiday season.

Looking for a thanksgiving appetizer that looks seriously impressive?

From thanksgiving classics to modern new favorites, find test kitchen guaranteed recipes for hosting the best start preparing for thanksgiving now with our ultimate thanksgiving recipe collection.

Here are all the best thanksgiving recipes to add to your table!

Over 75 of the best thanksgiving recipes all in one spot from appetizers, sides and desserts!

(via a pumpkin and a princess).

So why not give them a little something and the best part:

Thanksgiving appetizer recipes is a group of recipes collected by the editors of nyt cooking.

Source: www.dinneratthezoo.com

Before you bring out the bird (find the best turkey preparation tips by downloading our complete guide), these deliciously simple recipes will keep the hungry crowd happy while you finish the meal.

Here are all the best thanksgiving recipes to add to your table!

Source: thedecoratedcookie.com

Get the recipe from delish.

These fresh and healthy spins on the classics are absolutely full of flavor.

So why not give them a little something and the best part:

Turkey is fine, but let's be honest:

Use our menu of easy thanksgiving appetizers and side dish.

(tom mccorkle for the washington post/food styling by lisa cherkasky for the washington post.)

Turkey is fine, but let's be honest:

Most of these thanksgiving appetizers are easy to prepare, which means you.


Traditional Alaska Thanksgiving recipes

Food writer and cookbook author John Hadamuscin once wrote the following: "There are four unbroken rules when it comes to Thanksgiving -- there must be turkey and dressing, cranberries, mashed potatoes, and pumpkin pie."

Apparently Hadamuscin has never spent a Thanksgiving in Alaska, where instead of turkey, polar bear, whale steak and pickled maktak might well be the table centerpiece.

Indeed, the only real rule throughout the state so far as dining goes is to remember what another famous chef, Julia Child, once said about the universal eating experience: "Dining with one's friends and beloved family is certainly one of life's primal and most innocent delights, one that is both soul-satisfying and eternal."

In that spirit, Alaska Dispatch has compiled some soul-satisfying recipes from across the state, some of which have been passed down from generation to generation, and will, hopefully, remain eternal.

Thanksgiving in the Aleutian Islands

From the Aleutian Islands and the community of Sand Point, we bring you a traditional spin on crab cakes. In this recipe, Octopus provides the meat source, rich in Omega-3s and iodine. This recipe, and the ones that follow, are compliments of Store Outside Your Door, a wellness and prevention initiative of the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium. The project features the harvest and preparation of traditional foods, presented in recipes from contemporary chefs.

Watch how octopus are harvested from a tide pool here as traditional foods expert Peter Devine Jr. takes you hunting on the beach, then preps the octopus for chef Flora Deacon's inspired cuisine.

Octopus Patties or Burgers

3/4 cup red onion, small dice

3/4 cup red, green and yellow bell pepper, small dice

Sea salt and black pepper

Cook partially skinned octopus in plenty of water in large pot (keep the suckers on to add color). It takes one and a half hours to cook octopus until tender. Cool until it's safe to handle. Cut in small pieces, small enough to fit in grinder. Grind using the smallest grinding blade. Set aside.

Save a few teaspoons each diced vegetable, set aside for salad. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in sauté pan add onion, celery, carrot and bell peppers. Cook until translucent, about 5 minutes.

Add mix to ground octopus, mix well. Add sea salt and pepper to taste. Use an ice cream scoop to measure burgers.

Heat additional 1-2 tablespoons oil in same sauté pan.

Add octopus burgers, cook until browned on both sides.

Serve with Sea Lettuce salad and Sesame Rice Wine Vinaigrette.

Sea Lettuce and Sesame Rice Wine Vinaigrette

4-6 pieces cleaned and dried sea lettuce, sliced in ½ inch pieces

2 teaspoons red onion, fine dice

2 teaspoons carrot, fine dice

2 teaspoons red, yellow and green bell pepper, fine dice

Wash and dry sea lettuce with paper towels. Make vinaigrette by mixing vinegar and honey. Add sesame oil. Mix well. Add diced raw vegetables. Pour over sea lettuce, toss well. Season with sea salt and pepper to taste. Serve with octopus burgers.

Badarkis with Marinated Kelp Salad

Also from the community of Sand Point comes a recipe for a snail-like creature, Badarki. Badarki is a type of Chiton and a member of the mollusk family, found on rocky beaches where it can dine on algae. With eight protective plates covering it's body, it looks like an overturned boat, hence the name Bidarki, a Russian word for the boats used to hunt, fish and travel in.

In this recipe, chef Flora Deacon prepares a boiled version of the marine delicacy served over a salad made with marinated kelp.

1 tablespoon red onion, fine dice

2 tablespoons red, yellow and green bell pepper, fine dice

1 tablespoon rice vinegar

Cook badarki's in water till tender about a half hour to 45 minutes. Let cool.

Peel black skin off and remove guts, discard. Dice or shred meat, set aside.

Wash and dry kelp. Remove ribs from kelp and dice. Chop the leaves.

Make vinaigrette from the vinegar, sesame oil and honey add the sesame seeds and diced vegetables.

Pour over kelp, toss well. Serve salad with bidarkis.

Puffin with Quinoa

Farther west in the Aleutian Chain lies Akutan, a small community located near prime fishing waters and close to a Trident Seafoods fish processing plant for cod, crab and pollock. Akutan is also the site of a traditional Unangan village.

In this recipe, chef Flora Deacon shows how to prepare sauteed Puffin breast in olive oil served over a bed of beef broth-infused quinoa.

Puffin Breast with Quinoa Pilaf with Local Greens

Debone puffin breast, sprinkle lightly with sea salt and black pepper.

Sauté in olive oil. Set aside.

Saute carrot, celery and onion in olive oil.

Add 1 cup quinoa and 2 cups water or beef broth. Cook 15 minutes until quinoa is done.

Add beach lovage and other beach greens to pilaf. Serve pilaf with sliced puffin over top.

Thanksgiving in the Bering Strait

Little Diomede

On an Alaska island so remote it's closer to Russia than the North American mainland, villagers from Little Diomede will spend Thanksgiving cooking up holiday meals at home, since the school where the communitywide feast is usually held is under construction.

A steep and rocky outcropping rising from the frigid Bering Strait, Little Diomede Island villagers -- Ingalikmiut Eskimos -- survive off the land and sea, eating what is readily available just outside their doorstep: seal, polar bear, blue crab and whale.

This year they all have turkeys to roast, compliments of the school. But you can also expect to find polar bear, walrus and a traditional berry dessert on the menu. Here are recipes from Little Diomede resident and tribal coordinator Frances Ozenna.

Polar Bear Prepared Two Ways

Diced: Dice polar bear meat, leaving fat on some chunks of meat. Season pieces with bouillon, onion, Mrs. Dash Seasoning Blend and salt. Boil.

(Chef's note: Polar bear fat is drier than walrus or seal blubber. It is neither fatty nor runny and is subtle in taste and very tender.)

Diced variation: Cook polar bear meat with frozen, sliced fermented walrus flipper.

(Chef's note: When you eat the two together it sweetens the bear meat, and the bear takes away the greasy taste of the fermented flipper.)

Serve with: mixed greens and oil.

Stew: For choice cuts, choose meat form the back polar bear shoulder blade. Dice meat. Marinate in refrigerator for one to two days with beef bouillon, Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce, garlic, onion and Mrs. Dash Seasoning Blend. After marinating, rinse well to remove some of the blood.

(Chef's note: a small amount of brown sugar can also be added to the seasoning.)

Boil a pot of water and add onion, Mrs. Dash, bouillon, salt, Worcestershire sauce. Add meat and simmer for 1.5 to 2 hours. Add rice, potatoes and carrots, if available. Thicken with flour, corn starch or elbow macaroni about ten minutes before the soup is done. Let stew rest, then serve.

Serve with: homemade corn bread or biscuits.

Walrus Stew

Stew: Dice and salt meat, and bring to a boil in a pot of water. The mixture will bubble up as it cooks, creating its own thick broth. Add rice and onions.

Variation: Add diced seaweed or wild potatoes and consider adding a little bit of walrus fat to enhance flavor of the broth.

Serve with: walrus coak (an Inupiaq word), which is walrus skin with a about an inch of blubber still attached cooked with salt and water, similar to muktuk from a whale.

(Chef's note: Eat this combo by taking a bite of coak, then taking a spoonful of stew. Also, this walrus stew is a very traditional recipe, unlike the recipe for polar bear stew, which represents a newer interpretation of an otherwise traditional meal.)

Diomede Dessert

Berries with reindeer fat: This is Little Diomede's regional variation on akutaq, more commonly known among non-Alaska Natives as Eskimo ice cream -- a dish that literally means "mix them together." In Diomede, salmonberries are the main berry used in this recipe, although people with relatives on the mainland are also able to import blackberries.

Mix together: Berries, sugar, water, a little bit of seal or Wesson oil, and reindeer fat.

(Chef's note: for an added burst of flavor, add in a can of strawberry or cherry pie filling at the end.)

Thanksgiving at the top of the world

Barrow

As in many Alaska communities, families in Barrow -- the northernmost town in the United States -- have traditional recipes that grace Thanksgiving tables, alongside the quintessential staple of the holiday: turkey.

In this Arctic community where the Chukchi Sea hugs the village shoreline, residents hail from generations of Inupiat Eskimo whalers. Barrow is the economic center of the North Slope Borough, which is also home to the nation's largest oil field, Prudhoe Bay. Many in the region hunt and fish, harvesting whale, seal, polar bear, walrus, duck, caribou, grayling and whitefish. The following recipes reflect this tradition:

Whale Steak

1 steak-size slice of whale meat of your preference (bowhead is often used)

Seasoning of your choice to taste

Slice the whale meat, roll in flour, salt, pepper and seasoning mixture.

Heat frying pan with oil of choice.

Place meat with flour mixture in pan and add sliced onions.

Pickled Muktuk (variation 1)

(Muktuk, or maktak, is whale skin with blubber)

How to make brine:

Cut maktak in small pieces. Boil 30 minutes.

Add plenty of salt and pepper while muktuk boils.

Put muktuk in jar with lots of onions.

Pour cooled brine over maktak and keep in refrigerator for 4-to-7 days.

Pickled Muktuk (variation 2)

Cut muktuk into bite sizes.

Add 1 cup Apple Cider vinegar.

Chill overnight and enjoy.

Thanksgiving in Southeast Alaska

Indian Village in Juneau

Percy Kunz, who lives with her husband in Juneau's historic Indian Village -- a place throughout the years that's been whittled down to only a few buildings -- doesn't prepare a Thanksgiving meal herself. She lets her niece do the cooking, and a turkey normally takes up the center of the table.

But sometimes a side dish with more traditional foods is also served. The one that Kunz fancies in particular is a salad made from herring eggs. Kunz said her family gathers the eggs in Sitka in spring, usually around Easter, by cutting down a tree and submerging it in the water. Then they wait a few days and, hopefully, the tree becomes covered in eggs.

"You can see very little of the tree," she said. "It's like the tree is covered in little beads stuck together."

Percy Kunz's Herring Egg Salad

A couple of handfuls of fresh spinach

1/4 cup of mayonnaise, or until salad is moist

Calling around Southeast Alaska, it was a little hard to find a main dish that deviated from turkey. But the folks at SeaAlaska Heritage Institute had a few choice recipes. The first, a traditional seagull egg pie, might sound a little off-putting to those who haven't dined on the eggs. But in Britain, at least, they're all the haute-cuisine rage.

A 2009 Telegraph story notes that at Le Gavroche in central London, seagull eggs are served "poached, either with artichokes, smoked salmon and caviar, or with chicken, truffles and foie gras." The New York Times notes that gull eggs taste "surprisingly un-oceanic -- subtle in flavor, and very good, especially the yolks, which are rich and, well, eggy and have an excellent creamy texture . "

Seagull Egg Pie

Beat eggs, sugar salt vanilla together. Add milk and beat for 5 minutes.

Place in unbaked pie shell and sprinkle with nutmeg.

Bake for 45 minutes in an oven preheated to 400 degrees.

Thanksgiving in Interior Alaska

Kandik River

Mark Richards, who lives on the remote Kandik River in Northeast Alaska with his wife Lori, makes those long, cold winter nights tastier with this rolled moose rib roast. "We always bring everything back on the bone," Richards said of the moose. "The sinew is taken from the long length of backstrap meat -- one wide long piece and you then are able to peel off thinner lengths of sinew to use for cordage."

To get the meat off the ribs, cut along each rib bone to peel the meat off so it comes off in one large piece. "We had a very rough moose hunt this year and only got a yearling bull, which is not enough meat," Richards said.

Consequently, some butt-end rings of beaver that Richards trapped earlier this year might have to substitute. But Richards may also end up buying a turkey on his next trip to town and bringing it back to his cabin for what he calls "a real treat." Lori's homemade highbush cranberry sauce goes on top. Also on the table will be cabbage salad, potatoes, homemade sourdough bread, blueberry pie (from blueberries jarred up in August), with "snowcream" (ice cream made from snow).

Rolled moose rib roast tied with backstrap sinew

Sprinkle both sides with salt, pepper, summer savory, garlic and onions.

Roll tight. Tie and bake for approximately 2 hours.

Cover with cranberry glaze. To get the meat off the ribs, cut along each rib bone to peel off the meat in one large piece.

Thanksgiving in Western Alaska

From the seashores of Western Alaska comes a recipe for Geese soup, which will dress up a traditional Thanksgiving meal of turkey, cranberry sauce and yams.

Unalakleet is the first checkpoint along the coast in the famous Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Racers reach it after travelling hundreds of miles across Alaska's interior and the Yukon River westward from Anchorage on their way Nome. The village is located on the eastern side of Norton Bay, fed by the Bering Sea. This recipe is compliments of Crystal Kaleak via her sister, Cheryl McKay. McKay also included a special appetizer. Enjoy!

Appetizer

Unalik (fresh-boiled muktuk) -- serve on toothpicks.

Nigliq ("Geese") Soup Recipe from Crystal McKay Kaleak

1 Speckle-breasted Nigliq (Greater White Fronted Goose) plucked, and cut up

4 large potatoes or 6 small potatoes quartered

3 tablespoons of white flour dissolved in 1/2 cup water

Fill a large soup pot with water.

Add the cut up goose and all its parts, including the head, feet, heart and other organs. Make sure you wash the gizzard well and peel away, and discard the yellow, leathery piece on the flat side of the gizzard. Also, remove the green-colored bile sac located next to the liver and discard. Cut the head from the neck and add them to the soup. Keep the heart and lungs together where they are attached, and add to the soup. (If you do not want to add the lungs to the soup, then pull the heart out and add to the soup, and discard the lungs).

When you get to the breast meat, cut it away from the bone and cut it into 4 even pieces. Add the breast bone, back bone, and wings to the soup. Cut the feet off at the joint, and add the feet and legs to the soup. Every part of the goose should be added to the soup, including the clotted blood which adds to the flavor.

Next, add the cut up potatoes, onion, minced onions, and salt and pepper.

Bring the soup to a boil then turn down heat to a low-medium level and cook for 45 minutes. Stir the soup every 10 minutes or so.

The last 10 minutes of cooking, add 3 tablespoons of flour whisked into a half-cup of water with a fork or a whisk to thicken the soup.

If the soup is already thick from the potatoes, it's up to you how much flour water you want to add. Enjoy! Aarigaa!


The 20 Best Instagram Recipes From 2020

When we’re looking to gauge what our readers are craving, we check out the most-liked recipes on the HuffPost Taste Instagram account. Though this year started off relatively normal, the foods we ate starting in March gave an indication of how our lives were changing.

In March, the most popular recipes were pantry-friendly rice dishes and deep-dish cookie bowls that can be eaten in one’s pajamas. Then in April, whipped Dalgona coffee was everywhere. America’s collective sweet tooth got the best of readers in May and June, with chocolate cake, strawberry cobbler and a cake/cheesecake mashup making the list. Peaches were in high demand in July and August, but in September and October cravings turned to lemon butter pasta, chicken fingers, a burrata-topped ragu and more comforting fare. And then once November came, it was all about Thanksgiving and holiday food.

Below, take a stroll through the 20 most-loved recipes from 2020. It may have been a difficult year, but it was still a delicious one (well, maybe not every day).


50 Stuffing Recipes

Everyone knows that stuffing is the best part of Thanksgiving. Choose the perfect one (or two) for your feast.

Related To:

How to make stuffing:
1. Cook vegetables, fruits, herbs and/or meat in butter, then add broth.
2. Toss with beaten eggs and cubed bread.
3. Transfer to a buttered baking dish and dot with butter or drippings. Bake, covered, at 375 degrees F, 30 minutes uncover and bake until golden, about 30 more minutes (or cook the cooled stuffing in the turkey).

Yield: Each recipe serves eight and is enough to fill a 12-14 pound turkey.

1. Classic Melt 1 stick butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add 2 cups each diced onions and celery and 1 tablespoon each minced sage and thyme add salt and pepper and cook 5 minutes. Add 3 cups turkey or chicken broth and bring to a simmer. Beat 2 eggs with 1/4 cup chopped parsley in a large bowl add 16 cups cubed stale white bread, then pour in the vegetable-broth mixture and toss. Transfer to a buttered baking dish and dot with butter. Cover and bake 30 minutes at 375 degrees F uncover and bake until golden, 30 more minutes. (Or stuff in your turkey and bake.)

2. Apple-Herb Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1), cooking 2 chopped apples with the onions.

3. Cranberry-Apple Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1), cooking 2 chopped apples and 1 cup dried cranberries with the onions.

4. Cranberry-Nut Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1), cooking 2 chopped pears and 1 cup dried cranberries with the onions. Toss in 1 cup chopped toasted walnuts or pecans with the bread.

5. Apricot-Hazelnut Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1) with chopped leeks instead of onions. Toss in 1 1/2 cups diced dried apricots and 1 cup chopped toasted hazelnuts with the bread.

6. Caramelized Onion Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1), tossing in 2 cups caramelized onions and 3/4 cup grated Parmesan with the bread. Top with more Parmesan before baking.

7. Bourbon-Pecan Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1), adding 2 chopped pears, 1 cup chopped pecans and 1/2 cup bourbon to the cooked vegetables simmer 2 minutes before adding the broth.

8. Potato Bread Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1) with cubed potato bread instead of white bread.

9. Apple-Fennel Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1) with potato bread. Use diced fennel bulb instead of celery. Cook 1 cup each chopped apples and dried cranberries with the onions and fennel.

10. Oyster Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1) with potato bread. Add 1 tablespoon Old Bay instead of sage add 1/4 cup dry vermouth and 1/2 cup oyster juice with the broth. Toss in 1 pound shucked oysters with the bread.

11. Chestnut Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1), cooking 1 1/2 cups chopped chestnuts with the onions.

12. Giblet Simmer the turkey neck and giblets (except the liver) in 3 cups turkey or chicken broth until tender, 1 hour. Add the liver and cook 5 minutes. Strain and reserve the broth, then chop the giblets (including the liver) and the neck meat. Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1), adding the giblets and neck with the onions and using the reserved broth.

13. Mushroom-Leek Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1) with 3 cups chopped leeks instead of onions. Cook 1 pound sliced cremini mushrooms with the leeks and celery.

14. Porcini Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1) with shallots instead of onions and rosemary instead of sage. Cook 4 ounces chopped prosciutto and 1 pound sliced porcini mushrooms with the shallots and celery.

15. Wild Mushroom Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1) with 3 cups chopped leeks instead of onions and rosemary instead of sage cook with 1 pound sliced mixed wild mushrooms.

16. Spinach-Gruyere Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1) with 3 cups chopped leeks instead of onions cook with 1 pound sliced cremini mushrooms. Let the broth mixture cool slightly. Add 6 cups chopped spinach and 1 cup diced Gruyère with the bread.

17. Roasted Vegetable Roast 8 cups diced winter squash, carrots, parsnips and red onion at 400 degrees F until golden, about 25 minutes. Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1), substituting the roasted vegetables for half of the bread.

18. Stuffing Muffins Line 12 jumbo muffin cups with paper liners and fill with your favorite bread stuffing (we used Mushroom-Leek, No. 13). Bake, uncovered, at 375 degrees F until golden, about 45 minutes.

19. Sourdough Make Classic Stuffing (No. 1) with sourdough. Use rosemary instead of sage.

20. Sausage Brown 1 pound crumbled sausage in 6 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add 2 cups each diced onions and celery and 1 tablespoon each minced sage and thyme add salt and pepper and cook 5 minutes. Add 3 cups chicken broth and bring to a simmer. Beat 2 eggs with 1/4 cup chopped parsley in a bowl add 16 cups cubed stale white bread, then pour in the vegetable-broth mixture and toss. Transfer to a buttered baking dish and dot with butter. Cover and bake at 375 degrees F, 30 minutes uncover and bake until golden, 30 more minutes.

21. Sausage-Apple Make Sausage Stuffing (No. 20) with Italian fennel sausage. Cook 2 diced apples with the onions.

22. Squash-Pancetta Make Sausage Stuffing (No. 20) with diced pancetta instead of sausage. Cook 1 pound diced peeled butternut squash with the onions.

23. Chestnut-Semolina Make Sausage Stuffing (No. 20) with diced pancetta instead of sausage. Cook 1 1/2 cups chopped chestnuts with the onions. Use semolina bread.

24. Polish-Style Make Sausage Stuffing (No. 20) with diced kielbasa. Cook 1 pound drained, rinsed sauerkraut and 2 teaspoons paprika with the onions.

25. Kale-Garlic Make Sausage Stuffing (No. 20), adding 4 cups chopped kale and 1 head peeled roasted garlic cloves with the broth. Use semolina bread.

26. Squash-Prosciutto Make Sausage Stuffing (No. 20) with diced prosciutto instead of sausage. Cook 1 pound diced peeled butternut squash with the onions. Toss in 1/2 cup pine nuts with the bread.

27. Chorizo Make Sausage Stuffing (No. 20) with fresh chorizo and use oregano instead of sage.

28. Chorizo-Manchego Make Sausage Stuffing (No. 20) with fresh chorizo and sourdough bread. Use oregano instead of sage. Toss in 1 cup chopped dates and 1/2 cup cubed manchego cheese with the bread.

29. Sun-Dried Tomato Make Sausage Stuffing (No. 20) with spicy sausage and semolina bread. Toss in 1 cup sliced sun-dried tomatoes with the bread. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup grated Parmesan before baking.

30. Focaccia Make Sausage Stuffing (No. 20) with diced pancetta instead of sausage. Use 1 tablespoon rosemary instead of sage and thyme, and diced fennel bulb instead of celery. Use focaccia bread toss in 2 cups halved grapes with the bread

31. Cornbread Melt 1 stick butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add 2 cups each diced onion and celery and 1 tablespoon each minced sage and thyme add salt and pepper and cook 5 minutes. Add 3 cups chicken or turkey broth and bring to a simmer. Beat 2 eggs with 1/4 cup chopped parsley in a large bowl add 6 cups cubed stale cornbread and 8 cups white bread, then pour in the vegetable-broth mixture and toss. Transfer to a buttered baking dish and dot with butter. Cover and bake at 375 degrees F, 30 minutes uncover and bake until golden, about 30 more minutes.

32. Ham-Cornbread Make Cornbread Stuffing (No. 31) with chopped scallions instead of onions. Use ham broth and add 2 cups shredded stewed ham hock or country ham with the bread.

33. Creole Cornbread Make Cornbread Stuffing (No. 31) and cook 1 green pepper and a pinch of cayenne with the onions. Add 1 1/2 cups each sliced okra and cooked wild rice with the broth.

34. Cornbread-Sausage Make Cornbread Stuffing (No. 31) but cook 1 pound crumbled sausage in 6 tablespoons butter before adding the vegetables.

35. Mustard-Ham Make Cornbread Stuffing (No. 31), but cook 1 pound diced ham in 6 tablespoons butter before adding the vegetables. Use rosemary instead of sage. Add 1/4 cup whole-grain mustard with the broth.

36. Crab Make Cornbread Stuffing (No. 31), but cook 1 pound diced ham in 6 tablespoons butter before adding the vegetables, including 1 chopped green pepper and 1/2 teaspoon Old Bay. Add 1 pound crabmeat with the bread.

37. Spicy Bacon Make Cornbread Stuffing (No. 31) but cook 1/2 pound diced bacon in 6 tablespoons butter before adding the vegetables, including 1 sliced jalapeno. Add 2 cups diced pepper jack cheese with the bread.


Rhode Island clam chowder

Note that the salt content of clam broth and linguica can vary significantly, so use your sense of taste to guide seasoning. Frozen chopped clams are available at most local Whole Foods. Linguica, a Portuguese sausage, can be difficult to find in the Midwest Paulina Market, 3501 N. Lincoln Ave., typically carries it.

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 pound linguica sausage

4 cups chopped sea clams

4 cups bottled clam broth

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

4 russet potatoes, peeled and cut into ¾-inch dice

1. In a large Dutch oven or stock pot, heat oil over medium flame. Brown sausage on all sides. Remove from pot and slice into ¼-inch-thick coins.

2. Meanwhile, saute onions until softened in remaining oil and sausage fat.

3. Add clams, broth, water, butter and bay leaf to pot and turn up the heat to high. Bring to a boil.

4. Stir in potatoes and sausage return to a boil. Taste the broth and add pepper and salt as necessary. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 40 minutes, or until the potatoes are tender, but not falling apart.

5. Remove ½ cup of the potatoes and place them in a bowl. Mash with a fork and stir them back into the chowder. Remove bay leaf and adjust seasonings as necessary.

Nutrition information per serving: 328 calories, 15 g fat, 5 g saturated fat, 62 mg cholesterol, 22 g carbohydrates, 1 g sugar, 24 g protein, 1,162 mg sodium, 2 g fiber

Mashed potatoes with a magic touch

Perhaps I’m going to out-Midwest myself when I say that these potatoes are a major part of why I look forward to Thanksgiving each year. My mom has always been committed to cooking this glorious, rich side dish only once a year, thanks to the heaps of butter, sour cream and cream cheese folded in. As kids, my sister and I would race to peel our bags of potatoes, and then eagerly await the moment when we’d be called upon as taste testers to sample the result.

My mom grew up in the same idyllic small town in Ohio that I did, the rascally youngest of four living just down the street from her Czech immigrant grandparents. The culinary heritage passed down to me centered on hearty soups and lashings of gravy — any cousin that asked for just a light dousing on her turkey was lovingly teased as probably adopted.

While my mom has spent years trying to replicate her grandmother’s chicken paprikash, she told me recently that her Thanksgiving mashed potatoes originated from a Martha Stewart recipe. She has tweaked it over the years, adapting it for larger and larger holidays as our family expands, and given me the recipe — although her pink 4x6 index card contains only ingredients, no steps. Luckily, it’s a fairly simple process, and she’s only a call away. In the couple of times I’ve made these mashed potatoes, they’ve never quite had the same magic touch that only mothers know. Maybe in a few years I’ll have it down pat.

Thanksgiving mashed potatoes

2 teaspoons olive oil

10 pounds Idaho or russet potatoes

1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter

8 ounces cream cheese

2 to 2½ teaspoons salt, to taste

1. In a large stock pot or Dutch oven, boil 6 quarts water, or enough to cover potatoes.

2. Meanwhile, heat your oven to 375 degrees. Chop off the top ½ inch of a head of garlic before wrapping in aluminum foil. Drizzle the olive oil over the garlic cloves, close the bundle of foil, and roast in the oven for 15 to 20 minutes, until garlic is fragrant, golden and soft. Remove and let cool. Remove the cloves out of the skins by squeezing them through the cut ends with your fingers.

3. Peel potatoes and dice into ¾- to 1-inch cubes. Add to boiling water, allowing the water to return to boiling before lowering to a simmer for about 15 minutes.

4. Once potatoes give easily when poked with a fork, drain in a colander. Let cool for 10 minutes, or until potatoes can be easily handled.

5. Using a potato ricer, shred diced potatoes for lightest, fluffiest results. If you don’t have a ricer, a pastry blender or fork can be used to mash them.

6. Using either the rinsed-out stock pot or Dutch oven, or a slow cooker for easy transport and serving, add butter (use the ricer again for easier blending), cream cheese, sour cream and garlic.

7. Add riced potatoes and mix, gently heating the combined mixture over the stovetop or in your slow cooker. Potatoes can stay in the slow cooker on low heat for several hours. Serve with gravy, an extra pat of butter and additional salt and pepper to taste.

Nutrition information per serving: 669 calories, 31 g fat, 19 g saturated fat, 87 mg cholesterol, 90 g carbohydrates, 5 g sugar, 10 g protein, 595 mg sodium, 8 g fiber

Bringing Italian flavor to the American table

Looking back, it seems surprising to me to have a baking dish full of cannelloni on the already overachieving Thanksgiving table. But mom was Italian, born and raised, so at some point in our childhood it joined the turkey, stuffing, creamed corn and other dishes. Maybe she wanted something from her own family memories on that Midwestern menu as we gathered with my dad’s parents in our small Ohio village.

Cannelloni are crepes (crespelle in Italian), filled, sauced and baked. Hers were stuffed with ricotta, and I loved them. But it’s been years since I have had them, and I had never made them. But this strange year, I keep thinking about them.

With Mom long gone, I turned to my brother, Paul, the only one among us four kids who had the recipe — typed up on an index card in mom’s clumsy hunt-and-peck style, and cryptic to the point of consternation. For the crespelle (which she titled “shells”), she typed: “Mix all ingredients, make a very thin pancake.” That’s it, the totality of her directions to mix AND cook them. Fortunately, Paul has worked on the recipe over time, refining the ingredient amounts and working out the how-tos — which he gladly shared with me. My crespelle-making lacks style and finesse, but the finished cannelloni? They remind me of Mom’s — and of the whole family.

Cannelloni

1 can (28 ounces) whole Italian plum tomatoes

Freshly ground black pepper

3 large eggs, lightly beaten

5 ounces mozzarella, freshly grated, about 2 cups

¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano

¼ cup finely chopped Italian parsley

Freshly ground black pepper

1. For the tomato sauce, remove the tomatoes from the can, leaving the juice behind, but reserving it. Chop the tomatoes on a board until fine, but still with texture. Or pulse in a food processor.

2. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet add the garlic. Cook until the garlic becomes aromatic, 1 minute. Pour in the chopped tomatoes. Cook, stirring occasionally, until sauce thickens a bit, 10 minutes. (Add some reserved juice if you like a looser sauce.) Season with salt. Reserve.

3. For the crespelle, whisk the eggs together lightly in a bowl. Whisk in the flour, water, salt and pepper to taste, taking care to break up any lumps.

4. For the filling, stir ricotta, eggs, mozzarella, ¼ cup Parmigiano, parsley, salt and pepper to taste together in a bowl until well combined. Set aside.

5. Heat a small skillet over medium-high. Holding the butter with your fingers, run it over the bottom of the hot pan so that it melts and coats it with a thin film. Pour about 3 tablespoons batter into the skillet, immediately swirling the pan to spread the batter into a thin round, 6 to 7 inches wide. Cook until it sets, about 1 minute. Flip. Cook the other side just until firm, 1 minute or less. Transfer to a plate repeat with remaining batter, coating skillet lightly with more butter as needed.

6. Heat oven to 350. To fill the crespelle, place one in front of you on a work surface. Spoon a generous amount of filling (about 3 tablespoons) onto one end. Roll the crespella around the filling, tucking the other end underneath the roll. Ladle about ½ cup tomato sauce into the bottom of a large baking dish. Put the filled crespella into the dish. Repeat with remaining crespelle and filling, tucking the rolls snugly together in a single later. Ladle the remaining sauce over the top evenly. Sprinkle with remaining 2 tablespoons Parmigiano.

7. Bake until hot and the sauce bubbles and cheese melts, 30 to 35 minutes.

Nutrition information per serving: 512 calories, 30 g fat, 15 g saturated fat, 290 mg cholesterol, 32 g carbohydrates, 3 g sugar, 28 g protein, 1,244 mg sodium, 3 g fiber

Finally grateful for grandma’s devotion

I’m pretty sure, before she died, my grandmother cut corners whenever she made Indian pudding for Thanksgiving. The recipe required standing at a stove for what seemed like six days. Actual baking time was a more reasonable 14 hours. At least I felt that was reasonable, and whenever her pudding appeared before it should have, if I suspected my grandmother was not pulling her weight, I complained. I was not thankful for the work and patience she devoted. (Truth is, the baking time for most contemporary Indian pudding recipes is closer to three hours.)

But then, the dish itself, a New England stalwart, always felt like a meal out of time. It’s made with molasses, served at a temperature best described as lava and that name, Indian pudding — it’s so 1645. If it tastes like warm nostalgia, that’s because Indian pudding was nostalgia. Colonists in New England, uptight and uncertain of the future, missed the hasty puddings of their English childhoods. But they lacked the flour. What they had was a cracked Rhode Island cornmeal harvested by the Narragansetts.

The colonists improvised a literal mash of cultures into a rich, wiggly, molten gruel. My family sometimes added ginger. A friend whose blood was pure Brahmin swore pumpkin and maple syrup were key. Either way, it’s dessert, best when topped by a single scoop of coffee ice cream. Try it. Do your best. But without my grandmother to stand at your stove all day, the results may be varied.


Easy Meal Prep: The Ultimate Guide for Healthy, Delicious and Quick Meals

Guys, there&rsquos a secret to eating healthy, home-cooked meals that won&rsquot waste hours after work &mdash and no, it's not investing in a personal chef. It&rsquos meal prepping, or creating a few meals or dishes and portioning them out throughout the week. This can be as easy as stocking up on cottage cheese for breakfast, or as complicated as making a bunch of meals on Sunday and saving them for the rest of the week. Either way, it will save you time and money &mdash and it'll ensure that you stick to a healthy diet.

Need help getting started? We&rsquove outlined the basics and provided some tips to make it a bit less overwhelming.

1) Calculate how many meals you need.

Think about how many breakfasts, lunches, snacks and dinners you&rsquoll need throughout the week. Technically, if you want enough breakfast, lunches and dinners for the workweek, you would need 15 meals, but you don't have to cook 15 separate dishes. Instead, prepare a few large batches of meat and vegetables that can be used in various ways throughout the week.

Check out this downloadable template from The Kitchn to plan for the week. Or try one of our easy protein-packed recipes. And one additional tip: be sure to factor in things like dates and meals with clients. That way, you can plan more efficiently and avoid wasting food.

2) Keep it simple.

If you&rsquore new to cooking, Registered Dietitian and health coach at StrongerU, Jessica Bachman, PhD, MS-MPH, recommends staying away from recipes that require too many ingredients. Instead, &ldquothink of a meal as a veggie, a protein and a starch,&rdquo she says. So for instance, a quick dinner could be roasted pork loin, broccoli, and sweet potato.

3) Utilize leftovers.

Bachman&rsquos clients often struggle with planning both lunch and dinner. &ldquoJust choose one meal to start with. Then once you get a handle on that, start adding in more,&rdquo she says. Plus, you can make extra for dinner and eat the leftovers for lunch. &ldquoThat&rsquos so much easier than trying to take a different meal for lunch every day,&rdquo she explains.

4) Opt for easy cooking methods.

Sure, you may love the grill marks on that chicken, but cooking on the grill or stove requires more attention. Bachman recommends using an oven or slow cooker, since you can throw food in for a designated amount of time and simply monitor its progress. Plus, it&rsquos easier to cook large batches of food with both of these methods.

Just as good as Chipotle, but way healthier.

It's amazing on top of baked sweet potatoes.

It's time to up your snack game.

Swap rice for cauli rice for a Paleo-approved meal.

Your favorite Indian dish made Paleo-friendly.

You'll love this beanless chili.

You'll be making this hearty chili on repeat.

The ultimate cold weather comfort food.

5) Rely on frozen foods.

There&rsquos no need to prepare every single item on your plate. Instead of washing, cutting and steaming that side of broccoli, buy frozen vegetables instead. Additionally, many frozen fruits and vegetables, like broccoli, have just as many vitamins and minerals as their fresh counterparts.

6) Keep breakfast simple.

Mornings can be hectic, which is why Bachman recommends having the same breakfast every day. Just chop up some fruit so it can be thrown in the blender for smoothies, or pair it with Greek yogurt for a change of pace.

7) Have a go-to snack.

Similarly, Bachman advises choosing one snack, like pre-portioned nuts or a batch of hard-boiled eggs, that you can eat every day. That way, you won't have to hit up the vending machine when you're hit with the munchies.

8) Get creative.

Eating chicken every night doesn&rsquot have to be boring. Bachman says she makes a big batch of shredded chicken every week and uses it for a variety of dishes, like salads or fajitas. She recommends having a variety of sauces and seasonings on-hand, such as barbeque, buffalo, etc., to make each meal feel unique.

9) Buy budget-friendly staples.

There&rsquos no need to spend money on organic, grass-fed beef if you can&rsquot afford it. There are plenty of affordable, filling and nutrient-dense foods like eggs, quinoa and sweet potatoes, according to Bachman. For example, one large egg has 6.3 grams of protein, is loaded with vitamins A, D, E, and K and will only set you back $2 for one dozen (on average). Bachman recommends whipping up a veggie-loaded cauliflower fried rice with eggs for a budget-conscious and well-balanced meal.

Other economical picks that have plenty of protein include canned tuna, beans and salmon. Keep them on-hand to pair with meal-prepped salads, veggies or whole wheat pasta dishes.

Bachman also recommends buying seasonally. Opt for brussels sprouts and broccoli when they&rsquore in season during the fall because prices will be lower. In winter, switch them out for turnips and winter squash.

Check out this list of seasonal produce from the United States Department of Agriculture before hitting up the grocery store.

10) Write out your list and go shopping.

With your meals lined up, it&rsquos time to make a grocery list and head to the store. Try to do your big weekly shop on Saturday or early Sunday, so you have time to prep your ingredients before the work week begins. To get in and out as fast as possible, organize your grocery list by section (produce, meat, dairy, etc.).

11) Keep track of how long your items are in the fridge.

Cooked meat can safely be stored for three to four days in your fridge. After that, it&rsquos time to freeze.

12) Choose the best products to prep and pack your food.

It&rsquos worth blocking out time on the weekend to get your ingredients ready for weekday meal assembly. &ldquoOnce the week starts, there&rsquos a greater chance that the prep just won&rsquot happen,&rdquo Roussell says. Invest in a good set of clear glass or plastic containers so you know exactly how much you have. Here are some of the products we love:

Say goodbye to soggy salads with this container that keeps your ingredients separate.

A good set of containers is vital for work lunches. This set from Rubbermaid is sturdy, never leaks, and contains a variety of sizes.

The ideal container for yogurt bowls, this container keeps fruit and toppings fresh&mdashnot soggy.

This pack contains everything you need for a a day's worth of meals. One container holds your salad and the other is perfect for snacks, like fruit, crackers, or veggies.

Keep produce fresh for longer periods of time with these containers that include a crisp tray to reduce moisture and soggy vegetables.

Stop lugging around that bottle of sriracha. Instead, use this squeeze bottle that's perfect for transporting condiments.


Giada De Laurentiis Just Gifted Us With 5 Thanksgiving Dinner Menus & There’s Something for Everyone

Everyone’s Thanksgiving is bound to look significantly different this year. Some of us will be enjoying a delicious solo dinner while others may have a small group of family or friends over. However, whatever your holiday will look like, there’s no reason you shouldn’t have a fantastic meal served at your dinner table. Our favorite chef, Giada De Laurentiis, definitely understands this &mdash which is why she has launched five different Thanksgiving dinner menus that are customizable to your Thanksgiving experience.

The five Thanksgiving menus included in the chef’s guide are entitled: Italian Thanksgiving (because, how could our Italian food queen not include this?), A Little Lighter (featuring &mdash you guessed it! &mdash healthier dishes), First Time Turkey (for us novice cooks), Turkey For Two (for smaller holiday celebrations), and Virtual Thanksgiving Party of 1 (treat yourself!).

Included in each guide are appetizers, drinks, sides, and desserts. All you have to do is click on your appropriate guide and you’re presented with recipes from start to finish. In the mood for a sweet baked dessert with Limoncello Zabaglione? De Laurentiis has it. Craving a crispy side dish? she’s got that, too.

De Laurentiis has jam-packed the recipes needed to ensure all of her followers have a memorable Thanksgiving. And even if your dinner will be more low key than in year’s past, there’s no reason it shouldn’t be as festive as possible. After all, t here’s enough to be stressed about right now &mdash figuring out your Thanksgiving menu shouldn’t be one of them.

Make sure you bookmark Giada De Laurentiis’ full Thanksgiving menu. And if you need more guidance in the party planning area, check out these tips from celebrity party planner Mindy Weiss.

Need more celebrity-chef inspo? Check out Ina Garten’s easy weeknight dinner recipes below:


We highly recommend downloading the Food Monster App — with over 15,000 delicious recipes it is the largest meatless, vegan and allergy-friendly recipe resource to help you get healthy! it’s a brilliant food app for anyone looking to cut out or reduce allergens like meat, dairy, soy, gluten, eggs, grains, and more! You can also make meal plans, add bookmarks, read feature stories, and browse recipes across hundreds of categories like diet, cuisine, meal type, occasion, ingredient, popular, seasonal, and so much more!

For more Animal, Earth, Life, Vegan Food, Health, and Recipe content published daily, subscribe to the One Green Planet Newsletter !

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Courtesy of How Sweet Eats

Adding that leftover turkey to a regular sandwich is beginner's work. If you really want to spice up your Black Friday meals, add mashed potatoes and cranberry sauce to an egg sandwich for a morning-after-Thanksgiving breakfast that just might be better than the main meal.

Get the recipe from How Sweet Eats.


Roast Turkey With Garlic and Anchovies

Christopher Testani for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Barrett Washburne. Prop Stylist: Courtney de Wet.

In this flavorful recipe, a whole roasted turkey is seasoned like a Provençal leg of lamb, with rosemary, anchovies and plenty of garlic. Cutting tiny slits into the turkey’s legs helps distribute the garlic-anchovy paste, which perfumes the meat. You’ll need to start marinating the turkey at least a day ahead, although, if you have the space in your refrigerator and the time, starting two or three days ahead is even better. Chilling the turkey uncovered helps dry out the skin, yielding a particularly crisp and golden bird.