Traditional recipes

Moules marinières recipe

Moules marinières recipe

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Seafood
  • Shellfish
  • Mussels

Be transported to the south of France with this dish. Serve with crusty bread, and a nice chilled glass of white wine.

334 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 50 fresh mussels, scrubbed and debearded
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 5 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 spring onions, chopped
  • 3 plum tomatoes, chopped
  • 225ml (8 fl oz) white wine
  • 30g (1 oz) butter
  • 1 bunch fresh parsley, chopped
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:15min ›Ready in:25min

  1. Place mussels in a large bowl with cold water to cover. Let them soak for about 20 minutes to remove any dirt or sand.
  2. Heat olive oil in a large pot over medium-low heat. Add garlic, and sauté for one minute, but do not brown. Add the chopped spring onion and tomatoes, and cook until almost tender. Pour in the white wine, and stir in the parsley and butter. Bring to a boil, and allow to boil until the liquid has reduced by half, about 15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Add the mussels to the pot, cover and allow to cook until the shells are opened, about 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer the mussels and sauce to a large serving bowl, discarding any unopened shells. Bon appétit!

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(349)

Reviews in English (246)

Altered ingredient amounts.I halved the amount of mussels but kept the same quantities for the sauce. It was the perfect amount.-28 Feb 2010

Cooked this for my wife and myself,just adjusted the ingrediants accordingly. 3 cloves of garlic,150-175ml wine,2 spring onions,half a bunch of parsley,1 tomato and about 30 mussels,it was delicious and will be cooking it again next saturday evening-03 Feb 2013

Got to say, this was absolutely amazing Simple and cheap, but it sounds posh and tastes absolutely fab. I followed what the other commenters said cooked double the amount of sauce and it was the perfect amount.-17 Nov 2012


Raymond Blanc's moules marinière recipe

The finest of French dishes, Raymond Blanc's moules marinière combine freshly cooked mussels with onion, bay leaf, thyme, butter, parsley and a little whipping cream.

Ingredients

  • 1.8 kg best-quality mussels
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 8 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 15 g unsalted butter
  • 100 ml dry white wine
  • 2 tbsp whipping cream
  • 25 g fresh flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped
  • 4 lbs best-quality mussels
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 8 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 0.5 oz unsalted butter
  • 3.5 fl oz dry white wine
  • 2 tbsp whipping cream
  • 0.9 oz fresh flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped
  • 4 lbs best-quality mussels
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 8 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 0.5 oz unsalted butter
  • 0.4 cup dry white wine
  • 2 tbsp whipping cream
  • 0.9 oz fresh flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped

Details

  • Cuisine: French
  • Recipe Type: Starter
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Preparation Time: 20 mins
  • Cooking Time: 5 mins
  • Serves: 4

Step-by-step

  1. Cleaning the mussels: wash the mussels under cold running water, but don't scrub the shells or the colour will transfer to the juices during cooking, giving them an unappetizing grey appearance. If any of the mussels float it means they are not very fresh, so discard them (and ask your fishmonger to credit them). Press the shells of any open mussels together with your fingers if they don't close, discard them. Scrape off any barnacles from the mussels with a sharp knife and pull out the `beards', then drain well.
  2. Cooking the onion and herbs: over a medium heat, in a large pan, soften the onion, bay leaves and thyme in the butter for 1 minute.
  3. Cooking the mussels: add the mussels and white wine, cover the pan tightly with a lid and cook for 4-5 minutes, until the mussels open.
  4. Finishing the dish: stir in the cream and chopped parsley, then serve in a large dish or 4 soup plates. Give finger bowls to your guests and lots of good French bread to mop up the wonderful juices.

WWF as part of the Earth Hour campaign has teamed up with Raymond Blanc to produce this recipe. Photo taken by Jean Cazals.

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Moules mariniere

Marinières mussels (or mussels a la marinière) are mussels in white wine sauce. They are traditionally served with fries to compose moules-frites.

This dish has a story. It begins in 1235, when an Irishman named Patrick Walton, after a shipwreck in the Vendée, France, became known for the upbringing of mussels on submerged wood piles.

Charentais dispute the story that explain how the techniqhe of bouchau (a kind of valve) was invented by them in the tenth century. The frock, vest charentaise that descends below the waist, has given its name to a regional preparation where chopped panfried shallots in butter is doused with white wine.

Each year takes place in Lille, the first weekend of September, the famous flea market known internationaly.The most famous dish is mussels and frites.More than 400 tonnes of mussels in 2 days!

The advantage with mussels is that you can consume them all year round!
Belgians tend to eat the mussels marinière. Spain which is the largest producer is mainly using it in the paëlla

.The French have many uses, gratin, omelette, in salad with cream in the famous mouclade, stuffed, in soup, chips, kebabs, casseroles … as the mussel is well suited to the flavors of spices and condiments of the world.

Do you know the history of the mussel? It was developed in the thirteenth century, by chance, by an Irishman who discovered that mussels were clinging to the posts where the nets were stretched to catch birds, and that they collapsed under the weight of the mussels clinging. Therefore there was invented the domestication and breeding of mussels, it is called mussel farming.

They are a high source of omega-3, are rich in iron, phosphorus and calcium.
For one person, it takes a kilo for mussels marinières. The best known is the mussel “bouchot”, small in size but rich in taste.

Before preparing one must eliminate mussels already open or broken. They will be washed carefully and especially the filaments that are attached by scraping and washing under running water.

The mussel is ready when it starts to open wide. Eliminate as mussels that remain closed during cooking.

Raymond Blanc gives his recipe for this Normandy classic. Buy mussels that have already been cleaned and de-bearded to make it even quicker.

  • 1.8kg/3lbs 8oz mussels
  • 100ml/4fl oz dry white wine
  • 1 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 1 small onion, very finely chopped
  • 4 fresh bay leaves
  • 8 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 2 tbsp whipping cream
  • 3 tbsp chopped fresh flatleaf parsley

Wash the mussels under cold running water in a sink, removing any beards and barnacles. Do not scrub the shells as the colour will transfer during cooking giving an unappetising grey colour to the dish. Discard any mussels that float or remain open when tapped against the side of the sink.

Boil the wine in a small saucepan for 30 seconds then set aside. (This is to remove the harsh taste of the alcohol and leave only the fruity acidity of the wine.)

Melt the butter in a large saucepan over a high heat, then add the onion, bay leaves and thyme. Stir for 10 seconds, then add the wine and bring to a boil.

Add the mussels, cover with a lid and cook for 2-3 minutes or until the mussels open. (Discard any mussels that do not open.)

Add the whipping cream and parsley and stir well. No seasoning is required as the mussels will release a little salt water when they open, which is enough to season the dish perfectly.

Serve the mussels in a large warmed serving dish or four soup plates. Give your guests finger bowls and plenty of good-quality French bread to mop up the juices.


  • 1.75kg mussels
  • 1 garlic clove, finely chopped
  • 2 shallots, finely chopped
  • 15g butter
  • a bouquet garni of parsley, thyme and bay leaves
  • 100ml dry white wine or cider
  • 120ml double cream
  • handful of parsley leaves, coarsely chopped
  • crusty bread, to serve
  1. Wash the mussels under plenty of cold, running water. Discard any open ones that won’t close when lightly squeezed.
  2. Pull out the tough, fibrous beards protruding from between the tightly closed shells and then knock off any barnacles with a large knife. Give the mussels another quick rinse to remove any little pieces of shell.
  3. Soften the garlic and shallots in the butter with the bouquet garni, in a large pan big enough to take all the mussels – it should only be half full.
  4. Add the mussels and wine or cider, turn up the heat, then cover and steam them open in their own juices for 3-4 minutes. Give the pan a good shake every now and then.
  5. Remove the bouquet garni, add the cream and chopped parsley and remove from the heat.
  6. Spoon into four large warmed bowls and serve with lots of crusty bread.

Julia Child’s Mussels Mariniere

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs mussels
  • 2 Tb flour
  • 1/2 shallot chopped finely
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 parsley sprigs + more for garnish
  • 3 thyme sprigs leaves removed and chopped
  • 4 Tb butter
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

This post may contain amazon affiliate links which means if you make a purchase after clicking one of those links, I will receive a small commission. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Filed Under: Dinner, French Recipes, Seafood Recipes

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Ahoy There! Moules Marinières - French Sailor's Mussels

I adore moules, mussels, and this is the classic French recipe for them. Moules Marini&egraveres is also commonly known as Sailor's mussels or Mariner's mussels. The dish consists of delicately steamed fresh mussels in a white wine, garlic, parsley, butter, onion and cream sauce. Moules Marini&egraveres can be served as an appetising starter or even a light main meal. It is delicious served with fresh crusty bread or with frites (chips/fries). There is nothing more mouth-watering than a huge bowl of artistically presented mussels, yet the fun part is eating them. The best way is to use an empty mussel shell as the &quotspoon&quot in which to pick the remaining mussels from their shells and then eat them. It's a brilliant excuse to use your fingers to eat rather than the usual knife and for - very tactile! A traditional French recipe will use butter, however the butter may be substituted for a few tablespoons of olive oil for a healthier option - I sometimes use a mix of butter and olive oil I hope you find the step-by-step photos helpful, this recipe was used in the September 2008 Cooking School for the TOTM - hopefully, the photos will debunk the myth that mussels are hard to prepare and cook, NOT so! Bon App&eacutetit!


Moules marinières recipe - Recipes

Take a large heavy-based pan with a snug-fitting lid and heat the olive oil. Add the onion and garlic and cook over low heat for about 5 minutes until soft. Pour in the wine and as it boils and the alcohol burns off, add the mussels and thyme. Cover and let the mussels steam for 3–4 minutes. They are ready when the shells have opened. Add the cream and cook for 1 minute more.

Scatter with parsley and serve immediately with crusty bread, remembering to discard any mussels that haven’t opened.

Rinse the mussels thoroughly under plenty of running water and pull off the stringy beards, throwing away any broken shells and any that don’t close tightly when you tap them.

Take a large heavy-based pan with a snug-fitting lid and heat the olive oil. Add the onion and garlic and cook over low heat for about 5 minutes until soft. Pour in the wine and as it boils and the alcohol burns off, add the mussels and thyme. Cover and let the mussels steam for 3–4 minutes. They are ready when the shells have opened. Add the cream and cook for 1 minute more.

Scatter with parsley and serve immediately with crusty bread, remembering to discard any mussels that haven’t opened.


Aromatics

Rick Stein recipe moules marinières. Photograph: Felicity Cloake

Much as I love mussels, Elizabeth David's simple cider-only take on moules marinières is rather disappointing – they can take on some bigger flavours (to be fair, she does warn the reader that this "primitive version . is only really successful with the small and tender mussels which are none too easy to find in towns"). Something else is clearly needed and I prefer the sweet, almost winey flavour of shallots to the Prawn Cocktail Years onions, although I don't think this particular dish really needs the garlic deployed by Rick Stein and Tom Aikens: it seems too Mediterranean. The simple trinity of seafood, shallots and wine should be quite enough.

That said, herbs are a nice touch: a little thyme and a bay leaf, as used by Tom Aikens, add a subtle depth of flavour, while the chopped parsley which seems to be the mandatory garnish is pleasantly peppery, as well as providing a touch of colour.


Moules marinières recipe - Recipes

Add half of the butter. When sizzling, add the onions, celery and garlic, sweat for a few minutes. Then add the wine, cream and black pepper.

Stir this before adding the remaining butter. Pop the mussels in, and give everything a big stir and pop on a lid.

Cook for 4 minutes and sprinkle over some chopped parsley.

To char the bread, drizzle in olive oil and toast until charred. Serve this alongside the mussels!

Heat a large casserole dish until hot.

Add half of the butter. When sizzling, add the onions, celery and garlic, sweat for a few minutes. Then add the wine, cream and black pepper.

Stir this before adding the remaining butter. Pop the mussels in, and give everything a big stir and pop on a lid.

Cook for 4 minutes and sprinkle over some chopped parsley.

To char the bread, drizzle in olive oil and toast until charred. Serve this alongside the mussels!

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Ingredients

  • 50g butter
  • 1 onion peeled and diced
  • 2 sticks celery diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed to a paste
  • 2k mussels, cleaned
  • 250ml white wine
  • 250ml double cream
  • 4 thick slices of white crusty bread
  • 2 tbs olive oil
  • 1 small bunch of parsley

Method

Add half of the butter. When sizzling, add the onions, celery and garlic, sweat for a few minutes. Then add the wine, cream and black pepper.

Stir this before adding the remaining butter. Pop the mussels in, and give everything a big stir and pop on a lid.

Cook for 4 minutes and sprinkle over some chopped parsley.

To char the bread, drizzle in olive oil and toast until charred. Serve this alongside the mussels!

Heat a large casserole dish until hot.

Add half of the butter. When sizzling, add the onions, celery and garlic, sweat for a few minutes. Then add the wine, cream and black pepper.

Stir this before adding the remaining butter. Pop the mussels in, and give everything a big stir and pop on a lid.

Cook for 4 minutes and sprinkle over some chopped parsley.

To char the bread, drizzle in olive oil and toast until charred. Serve this alongside the mussels!


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