Traditional recipes

Charleston Oyster Roasts

Charleston Oyster Roasts

Charleston is acclaimed for its delectable seafood and soul-swelling comfort food. Charleston, S.C., is emerging as one of the top culinary destinations in the country because of its seaside location and Southern roots.

Charleston is known in particular for its oysters, which have a unique briny flavor. Popular oyster events in Charleston include oyster shucking festivals and oyster roasts, where guests come together to steam, shuck, and savor the city's most celebrated shellfish.

Where to Try a Charleston Oyster Roast:

Bowens Island Restaurant is notorious for its family-friendly oyster roasts and their oyster preparation in which oysters are steamed on a steel plate rather than served on a half roast.

Check out The Daily Meal’s Bowens Island What Is an Oyster Roast video. Bowens Island Restaurant owner Robert Barber discusses the flavors and uses of oysters from the South's Low Country while roasting the Southern delicacy.

Steaming oysters not only allows the shellfish to retain its scrumptious, salty taste but also makes it easier for diners to open, suck, and eat them, according to Barber.

"An oyster roast is a very communal event. It involves fellowship. You're standing around or sitting around a table," said Barber. "It does make people slow down a little bit and enjoy the fellowship here."

Must-Try Charleston Southern Comfort Food:

Other must-try restaurants in Charleston can be found on our list of the Best of Charleston's Southern Cooking, where diners can find the best spots to sample an array of Southern eats, such as fried green tomatoes, she-crab soup, squash casserole, collard greens, and fried pork chops.

Make Charleston Oysters at Home:

For those who wish to recreate their Charleston dining experience back home, try The Daily Meal's recipe for Oyster Casserole Charleston Style or Oyster Shooter provided by Charleston's Pearlz Oyster Bar.


Oysters

(White Point Gardens retains a nod to the moniker.) Colonists paved roads with shells and crushed them to make tabby for building houses and fortifications. Today, locals are still on intimate terms with the bivalve, but we’re betting you don’t know all of these tasty facts.

Thanks, guys:
These filter feeders ingest plankton and algae by opening and closing their shells (hinged together by an extremely strong adductor muscle), flushing an astounding 50 gallons of sea water a day through their gills. This not only provides the oyster with nutrients but helps cleanse the habitat of harmful pollutants.

Sex & the Single Oyster:
In a spawning season, one oyster can eject as many as 100 million eggs into the water, but only a small percentage of them reach maturity. The eggs become larvae that attach to other oyster shells and grow quickly into small oysters called ”spats.”

Roasting ritual:
Oyster roasts have been popular since the days of the early coastal Indians, who used the razor-sharp shells as knives for tasks such as tanning animal hides. They also created shell rings, likely for ceremonial purposes, and the Lowcountry boasts two of the largest remaining—one at Fig Island near the mouth of the North Edisto River and the Great Sewee Shell Ring near Awendaw, some 225 feet in diameter.

And So To Bed:
The shells have an extremely high (95%) calcium carbonate makeup and secrete a substance that acts as an adhesive that bonds them together in tight clusters, forming colonies known as “beds.“ These colonies provide a habitat for other marine life, help prevent erosion, and create barriers against storm-driven seas.

Lucky Charm:
Also called a “pea crab,” this tiny soft-shelled crustacean (Pinnotheres ostreum) lives symbiotically in the oyster and is considered a delicacy by gourmands when found in a steamed bivalve. Some believe that discovering one brings good luck.

Local Flavor:
Lowcountry oysters grow in clusters—with young oysters piling atop older ones in intertidal areas of creeks and sounds that are left exposed by high tide.

For a brown oyster stew recipe by chef Robert Stehling of Hominy Grill, click here.


Oysters

(White Point Gardens retains a nod to the moniker.) Colonists paved roads with shells and crushed them to make tabby for building houses and fortifications. Today, locals are still on intimate terms with the bivalve, but we’re betting you don’t know all of these tasty facts.

Thanks, guys:
These filter feeders ingest plankton and algae by opening and closing their shells (hinged together by an extremely strong adductor muscle), flushing an astounding 50 gallons of sea water a day through their gills. This not only provides the oyster with nutrients but helps cleanse the habitat of harmful pollutants.

Sex & the Single Oyster:
In a spawning season, one oyster can eject as many as 100 million eggs into the water, but only a small percentage of them reach maturity. The eggs become larvae that attach to other oyster shells and grow quickly into small oysters called ”spats.”

Roasting ritual:
Oyster roasts have been popular since the days of the early coastal Indians, who used the razor-sharp shells as knives for tasks such as tanning animal hides. They also created shell rings, likely for ceremonial purposes, and the Lowcountry boasts two of the largest remaining—one at Fig Island near the mouth of the North Edisto River and the Great Sewee Shell Ring near Awendaw, some 225 feet in diameter.

And So To Bed:
The shells have an extremely high (95%) calcium carbonate makeup and secrete a substance that acts as an adhesive that bonds them together in tight clusters, forming colonies known as “beds.“ These colonies provide a habitat for other marine life, help prevent erosion, and create barriers against storm-driven seas.

Lucky Charm:
Also called a “pea crab,” this tiny soft-shelled crustacean (Pinnotheres ostreum) lives symbiotically in the oyster and is considered a delicacy by gourmands when found in a steamed bivalve. Some believe that discovering one brings good luck.

Local Flavor:
Lowcountry oysters grow in clusters—with young oysters piling atop older ones in intertidal areas of creeks and sounds that are left exposed by high tide.

For a brown oyster stew recipe by chef Robert Stehling of Hominy Grill, click here.


Oysters

(White Point Gardens retains a nod to the moniker.) Colonists paved roads with shells and crushed them to make tabby for building houses and fortifications. Today, locals are still on intimate terms with the bivalve, but we’re betting you don’t know all of these tasty facts.

Thanks, guys:
These filter feeders ingest plankton and algae by opening and closing their shells (hinged together by an extremely strong adductor muscle), flushing an astounding 50 gallons of sea water a day through their gills. This not only provides the oyster with nutrients but helps cleanse the habitat of harmful pollutants.

Sex & the Single Oyster:
In a spawning season, one oyster can eject as many as 100 million eggs into the water, but only a small percentage of them reach maturity. The eggs become larvae that attach to other oyster shells and grow quickly into small oysters called ”spats.”

Roasting ritual:
Oyster roasts have been popular since the days of the early coastal Indians, who used the razor-sharp shells as knives for tasks such as tanning animal hides. They also created shell rings, likely for ceremonial purposes, and the Lowcountry boasts two of the largest remaining—one at Fig Island near the mouth of the North Edisto River and the Great Sewee Shell Ring near Awendaw, some 225 feet in diameter.

And So To Bed:
The shells have an extremely high (95%) calcium carbonate makeup and secrete a substance that acts as an adhesive that bonds them together in tight clusters, forming colonies known as “beds.“ These colonies provide a habitat for other marine life, help prevent erosion, and create barriers against storm-driven seas.

Lucky Charm:
Also called a “pea crab,” this tiny soft-shelled crustacean (Pinnotheres ostreum) lives symbiotically in the oyster and is considered a delicacy by gourmands when found in a steamed bivalve. Some believe that discovering one brings good luck.

Local Flavor:
Lowcountry oysters grow in clusters—with young oysters piling atop older ones in intertidal areas of creeks and sounds that are left exposed by high tide.

For a brown oyster stew recipe by chef Robert Stehling of Hominy Grill, click here.


Oysters

(White Point Gardens retains a nod to the moniker.) Colonists paved roads with shells and crushed them to make tabby for building houses and fortifications. Today, locals are still on intimate terms with the bivalve, but we’re betting you don’t know all of these tasty facts.

Thanks, guys:
These filter feeders ingest plankton and algae by opening and closing their shells (hinged together by an extremely strong adductor muscle), flushing an astounding 50 gallons of sea water a day through their gills. This not only provides the oyster with nutrients but helps cleanse the habitat of harmful pollutants.

Sex & the Single Oyster:
In a spawning season, one oyster can eject as many as 100 million eggs into the water, but only a small percentage of them reach maturity. The eggs become larvae that attach to other oyster shells and grow quickly into small oysters called ”spats.”

Roasting ritual:
Oyster roasts have been popular since the days of the early coastal Indians, who used the razor-sharp shells as knives for tasks such as tanning animal hides. They also created shell rings, likely for ceremonial purposes, and the Lowcountry boasts two of the largest remaining—one at Fig Island near the mouth of the North Edisto River and the Great Sewee Shell Ring near Awendaw, some 225 feet in diameter.

And So To Bed:
The shells have an extremely high (95%) calcium carbonate makeup and secrete a substance that acts as an adhesive that bonds them together in tight clusters, forming colonies known as “beds.“ These colonies provide a habitat for other marine life, help prevent erosion, and create barriers against storm-driven seas.

Lucky Charm:
Also called a “pea crab,” this tiny soft-shelled crustacean (Pinnotheres ostreum) lives symbiotically in the oyster and is considered a delicacy by gourmands when found in a steamed bivalve. Some believe that discovering one brings good luck.

Local Flavor:
Lowcountry oysters grow in clusters—with young oysters piling atop older ones in intertidal areas of creeks and sounds that are left exposed by high tide.

For a brown oyster stew recipe by chef Robert Stehling of Hominy Grill, click here.


Oysters

(White Point Gardens retains a nod to the moniker.) Colonists paved roads with shells and crushed them to make tabby for building houses and fortifications. Today, locals are still on intimate terms with the bivalve, but we’re betting you don’t know all of these tasty facts.

Thanks, guys:
These filter feeders ingest plankton and algae by opening and closing their shells (hinged together by an extremely strong adductor muscle), flushing an astounding 50 gallons of sea water a day through their gills. This not only provides the oyster with nutrients but helps cleanse the habitat of harmful pollutants.

Sex & the Single Oyster:
In a spawning season, one oyster can eject as many as 100 million eggs into the water, but only a small percentage of them reach maturity. The eggs become larvae that attach to other oyster shells and grow quickly into small oysters called ”spats.”

Roasting ritual:
Oyster roasts have been popular since the days of the early coastal Indians, who used the razor-sharp shells as knives for tasks such as tanning animal hides. They also created shell rings, likely for ceremonial purposes, and the Lowcountry boasts two of the largest remaining—one at Fig Island near the mouth of the North Edisto River and the Great Sewee Shell Ring near Awendaw, some 225 feet in diameter.

And So To Bed:
The shells have an extremely high (95%) calcium carbonate makeup and secrete a substance that acts as an adhesive that bonds them together in tight clusters, forming colonies known as “beds.“ These colonies provide a habitat for other marine life, help prevent erosion, and create barriers against storm-driven seas.

Lucky Charm:
Also called a “pea crab,” this tiny soft-shelled crustacean (Pinnotheres ostreum) lives symbiotically in the oyster and is considered a delicacy by gourmands when found in a steamed bivalve. Some believe that discovering one brings good luck.

Local Flavor:
Lowcountry oysters grow in clusters—with young oysters piling atop older ones in intertidal areas of creeks and sounds that are left exposed by high tide.

For a brown oyster stew recipe by chef Robert Stehling of Hominy Grill, click here.


Oysters

(White Point Gardens retains a nod to the moniker.) Colonists paved roads with shells and crushed them to make tabby for building houses and fortifications. Today, locals are still on intimate terms with the bivalve, but we’re betting you don’t know all of these tasty facts.

Thanks, guys:
These filter feeders ingest plankton and algae by opening and closing their shells (hinged together by an extremely strong adductor muscle), flushing an astounding 50 gallons of sea water a day through their gills. This not only provides the oyster with nutrients but helps cleanse the habitat of harmful pollutants.

Sex & the Single Oyster:
In a spawning season, one oyster can eject as many as 100 million eggs into the water, but only a small percentage of them reach maturity. The eggs become larvae that attach to other oyster shells and grow quickly into small oysters called ”spats.”

Roasting ritual:
Oyster roasts have been popular since the days of the early coastal Indians, who used the razor-sharp shells as knives for tasks such as tanning animal hides. They also created shell rings, likely for ceremonial purposes, and the Lowcountry boasts two of the largest remaining—one at Fig Island near the mouth of the North Edisto River and the Great Sewee Shell Ring near Awendaw, some 225 feet in diameter.

And So To Bed:
The shells have an extremely high (95%) calcium carbonate makeup and secrete a substance that acts as an adhesive that bonds them together in tight clusters, forming colonies known as “beds.“ These colonies provide a habitat for other marine life, help prevent erosion, and create barriers against storm-driven seas.

Lucky Charm:
Also called a “pea crab,” this tiny soft-shelled crustacean (Pinnotheres ostreum) lives symbiotically in the oyster and is considered a delicacy by gourmands when found in a steamed bivalve. Some believe that discovering one brings good luck.

Local Flavor:
Lowcountry oysters grow in clusters—with young oysters piling atop older ones in intertidal areas of creeks and sounds that are left exposed by high tide.

For a brown oyster stew recipe by chef Robert Stehling of Hominy Grill, click here.


Oysters

(White Point Gardens retains a nod to the moniker.) Colonists paved roads with shells and crushed them to make tabby for building houses and fortifications. Today, locals are still on intimate terms with the bivalve, but we’re betting you don’t know all of these tasty facts.

Thanks, guys:
These filter feeders ingest plankton and algae by opening and closing their shells (hinged together by an extremely strong adductor muscle), flushing an astounding 50 gallons of sea water a day through their gills. This not only provides the oyster with nutrients but helps cleanse the habitat of harmful pollutants.

Sex & the Single Oyster:
In a spawning season, one oyster can eject as many as 100 million eggs into the water, but only a small percentage of them reach maturity. The eggs become larvae that attach to other oyster shells and grow quickly into small oysters called ”spats.”

Roasting ritual:
Oyster roasts have been popular since the days of the early coastal Indians, who used the razor-sharp shells as knives for tasks such as tanning animal hides. They also created shell rings, likely for ceremonial purposes, and the Lowcountry boasts two of the largest remaining—one at Fig Island near the mouth of the North Edisto River and the Great Sewee Shell Ring near Awendaw, some 225 feet in diameter.

And So To Bed:
The shells have an extremely high (95%) calcium carbonate makeup and secrete a substance that acts as an adhesive that bonds them together in tight clusters, forming colonies known as “beds.“ These colonies provide a habitat for other marine life, help prevent erosion, and create barriers against storm-driven seas.

Lucky Charm:
Also called a “pea crab,” this tiny soft-shelled crustacean (Pinnotheres ostreum) lives symbiotically in the oyster and is considered a delicacy by gourmands when found in a steamed bivalve. Some believe that discovering one brings good luck.

Local Flavor:
Lowcountry oysters grow in clusters—with young oysters piling atop older ones in intertidal areas of creeks and sounds that are left exposed by high tide.

For a brown oyster stew recipe by chef Robert Stehling of Hominy Grill, click here.


Oysters

(White Point Gardens retains a nod to the moniker.) Colonists paved roads with shells and crushed them to make tabby for building houses and fortifications. Today, locals are still on intimate terms with the bivalve, but we’re betting you don’t know all of these tasty facts.

Thanks, guys:
These filter feeders ingest plankton and algae by opening and closing their shells (hinged together by an extremely strong adductor muscle), flushing an astounding 50 gallons of sea water a day through their gills. This not only provides the oyster with nutrients but helps cleanse the habitat of harmful pollutants.

Sex & the Single Oyster:
In a spawning season, one oyster can eject as many as 100 million eggs into the water, but only a small percentage of them reach maturity. The eggs become larvae that attach to other oyster shells and grow quickly into small oysters called ”spats.”

Roasting ritual:
Oyster roasts have been popular since the days of the early coastal Indians, who used the razor-sharp shells as knives for tasks such as tanning animal hides. They also created shell rings, likely for ceremonial purposes, and the Lowcountry boasts two of the largest remaining—one at Fig Island near the mouth of the North Edisto River and the Great Sewee Shell Ring near Awendaw, some 225 feet in diameter.

And So To Bed:
The shells have an extremely high (95%) calcium carbonate makeup and secrete a substance that acts as an adhesive that bonds them together in tight clusters, forming colonies known as “beds.“ These colonies provide a habitat for other marine life, help prevent erosion, and create barriers against storm-driven seas.

Lucky Charm:
Also called a “pea crab,” this tiny soft-shelled crustacean (Pinnotheres ostreum) lives symbiotically in the oyster and is considered a delicacy by gourmands when found in a steamed bivalve. Some believe that discovering one brings good luck.

Local Flavor:
Lowcountry oysters grow in clusters—with young oysters piling atop older ones in intertidal areas of creeks and sounds that are left exposed by high tide.

For a brown oyster stew recipe by chef Robert Stehling of Hominy Grill, click here.


Oysters

(White Point Gardens retains a nod to the moniker.) Colonists paved roads with shells and crushed them to make tabby for building houses and fortifications. Today, locals are still on intimate terms with the bivalve, but we’re betting you don’t know all of these tasty facts.

Thanks, guys:
These filter feeders ingest plankton and algae by opening and closing their shells (hinged together by an extremely strong adductor muscle), flushing an astounding 50 gallons of sea water a day through their gills. This not only provides the oyster with nutrients but helps cleanse the habitat of harmful pollutants.

Sex & the Single Oyster:
In a spawning season, one oyster can eject as many as 100 million eggs into the water, but only a small percentage of them reach maturity. The eggs become larvae that attach to other oyster shells and grow quickly into small oysters called ”spats.”

Roasting ritual:
Oyster roasts have been popular since the days of the early coastal Indians, who used the razor-sharp shells as knives for tasks such as tanning animal hides. They also created shell rings, likely for ceremonial purposes, and the Lowcountry boasts two of the largest remaining—one at Fig Island near the mouth of the North Edisto River and the Great Sewee Shell Ring near Awendaw, some 225 feet in diameter.

And So To Bed:
The shells have an extremely high (95%) calcium carbonate makeup and secrete a substance that acts as an adhesive that bonds them together in tight clusters, forming colonies known as “beds.“ These colonies provide a habitat for other marine life, help prevent erosion, and create barriers against storm-driven seas.

Lucky Charm:
Also called a “pea crab,” this tiny soft-shelled crustacean (Pinnotheres ostreum) lives symbiotically in the oyster and is considered a delicacy by gourmands when found in a steamed bivalve. Some believe that discovering one brings good luck.

Local Flavor:
Lowcountry oysters grow in clusters—with young oysters piling atop older ones in intertidal areas of creeks and sounds that are left exposed by high tide.

For a brown oyster stew recipe by chef Robert Stehling of Hominy Grill, click here.


Oysters

(White Point Gardens retains a nod to the moniker.) Colonists paved roads with shells and crushed them to make tabby for building houses and fortifications. Today, locals are still on intimate terms with the bivalve, but we’re betting you don’t know all of these tasty facts.

Thanks, guys:
These filter feeders ingest plankton and algae by opening and closing their shells (hinged together by an extremely strong adductor muscle), flushing an astounding 50 gallons of sea water a day through their gills. This not only provides the oyster with nutrients but helps cleanse the habitat of harmful pollutants.

Sex & the Single Oyster:
In a spawning season, one oyster can eject as many as 100 million eggs into the water, but only a small percentage of them reach maturity. The eggs become larvae that attach to other oyster shells and grow quickly into small oysters called ”spats.”

Roasting ritual:
Oyster roasts have been popular since the days of the early coastal Indians, who used the razor-sharp shells as knives for tasks such as tanning animal hides. They also created shell rings, likely for ceremonial purposes, and the Lowcountry boasts two of the largest remaining—one at Fig Island near the mouth of the North Edisto River and the Great Sewee Shell Ring near Awendaw, some 225 feet in diameter.

And So To Bed:
The shells have an extremely high (95%) calcium carbonate makeup and secrete a substance that acts as an adhesive that bonds them together in tight clusters, forming colonies known as “beds.“ These colonies provide a habitat for other marine life, help prevent erosion, and create barriers against storm-driven seas.

Lucky Charm:
Also called a “pea crab,” this tiny soft-shelled crustacean (Pinnotheres ostreum) lives symbiotically in the oyster and is considered a delicacy by gourmands when found in a steamed bivalve. Some believe that discovering one brings good luck.

Local Flavor:
Lowcountry oysters grow in clusters—with young oysters piling atop older ones in intertidal areas of creeks and sounds that are left exposed by high tide.

For a brown oyster stew recipe by chef Robert Stehling of Hominy Grill, click here.


Watch the video: The Right Way to Eat Oysters - Stop Eating it Wrong, Episode 8 (December 2021).