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8 Smart Lifestyle Changes

8 Smart Lifestyle Changes

Photo by Charles Wetherbee

1. Switch your cup (or cups) of coffee twice a week to green tea
This is seriously a no-brainer. Coffee has some health benefits, but green tea supersedes them by a mile. It boosts your metabolism, gives you energy, and is great for bone health and weight loss. And you can’t complain about not getting your caffeine fix because green tea has caffeine.

2. Skip meat once a week
Once a week, don’t eat meat. Saying no to meat even one day a week is the simplest way to cut out saturated fats and bad cholesterol. There are a ton of other ways to get protein, so no excuses!

Photo courtesy of Panoramio

3. Change to an interval workout
I cannot stress enough how good exercise is to not only your physical health but to your mental health while at college. A lot of young adults deal with stress and other issues that they don’t realize could be mitigated by an exercise routine. Even once or twice a week is better than none. That being said, new studies have shown that interval workouts, even if they’re shorter, are better for heart health and weight loss. If you like the treadmill, do 1-2 minutes on a high speed followed by 1-2 on a lower speed. You’ll find the results way better.

4. Swap the plates
This one may sound weird, but studies show that using bigger plates actually makes you eat more. Switching to a smaller plate can allow you to avoid some calories, prevent you from feeling too full, and allow you to save room for dessert.

Photo by Amanda Shulman

5. Eat more fish
Fish is brain food. It’s high in omega-3 fatty acids, which improve brain health, not to mention the benefits it has for your heart, skin, hair and memory. Fish also is a filling protein in any meal that can also lower your risk for many types of cancer.

Photo courtesy of Wise Geek

6. Keep a bottle of water next to your bed
Water is so good for you and it’s really underrated. If you keep a glass of bottle of water next to your bed, you’re more likely to hydrate yourself.

Photo by Marykate Surette

7. Refrain from vending machines
I know this one is annoying, especially because the library food-access at Penn is so limited and the hours are horrific. That being said, there are mostly inadequate options in vending machines that are filled with added salt and sugar. Plus, they’re really overpriced! Pack a bag of homemade popcorn, fruit or nuts instead and it will make all the difference.

Photo courtesy of Sheppard Software

8. Turn up the heat on your foods
Adding a little spice to your meal has been shown to boost your metabolism and improve your health. Chili peppers, hot sauce and even ginger are all great options. Studies also show that people consume about 75 fewer calories after eating red chili peppers!

View the original post, 8 Smart Lifestyle Changes, on Spoon University.

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7 Simple Ways to Reverse Prediabetes

Doable tweaks to your diet, movement and mindset that can improve insulin sensitivity.

Your doctor broke news you didn&apost want to hear: you have prediabetes, a condition where blood sugar is elevated, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. The thing is, with that info, you&aposre one of the lucky minority. Prediabetes is common, affecting 84 million American adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but just 10 percent are aware that they have it. Knowing that you have prediabetes can be enough to push you to make the changes you need, research shows.

While genes strongly influence whether someone develops prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, you have some control, says Jill Weisenberger, M.S., RDN, CDE, author of Prediabetes: A Complete Guide. "Even for those with a strong family history, lifestyle habits can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. And a delay can mean less medications for fewer years and fewer complications," she says. "The prediabetes stage is the best time to reverse course," Weisenberger adds. In fact, lifestyle changes have been shown to reduce the risk of prediabetes progressing to type 2, per a 2018 study in Primary Care Diabetes.

The goal: reduce insulin resistance and preserve beta cell function (beta cells are pancreatic cells that produce insulin). Minor weight loss-just 5 to 7 percent of your body weight-can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 58 percent, says the CDC, in part because a healthier weight generally means better insulin sensitivity. However, improving insulin sensitivity goes beyond the number on the scale. Here are seven ways to do just that.

Stop Focusing on Numbers

You may be prepared for a lifetime of breaking down your food by numbers (calories, fat, carbs), but "that&aposs much too simplistic and is likely to take you off course. Food quality is your best bet to improve insulin sensitivity," says Weisenberger. There&aposs no need to be scared of carbs, including whole grains (Learn more about the benefits of complex carbohydrates). What&aposs more, just because something is low-carb does not make it healthy. She recommends filling your plate with berries, vegetables, oats, barley, beans and lentils, which are all sources of high-fiber carbohydrates that help reduce risk of disease.


7 Simple Ways to Reverse Prediabetes

Doable tweaks to your diet, movement and mindset that can improve insulin sensitivity.

Your doctor broke news you didn&apost want to hear: you have prediabetes, a condition where blood sugar is elevated, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. The thing is, with that info, you&aposre one of the lucky minority. Prediabetes is common, affecting 84 million American adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but just 10 percent are aware that they have it. Knowing that you have prediabetes can be enough to push you to make the changes you need, research shows.

While genes strongly influence whether someone develops prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, you have some control, says Jill Weisenberger, M.S., RDN, CDE, author of Prediabetes: A Complete Guide. "Even for those with a strong family history, lifestyle habits can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. And a delay can mean less medications for fewer years and fewer complications," she says. "The prediabetes stage is the best time to reverse course," Weisenberger adds. In fact, lifestyle changes have been shown to reduce the risk of prediabetes progressing to type 2, per a 2018 study in Primary Care Diabetes.

The goal: reduce insulin resistance and preserve beta cell function (beta cells are pancreatic cells that produce insulin). Minor weight loss-just 5 to 7 percent of your body weight-can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 58 percent, says the CDC, in part because a healthier weight generally means better insulin sensitivity. However, improving insulin sensitivity goes beyond the number on the scale. Here are seven ways to do just that.

Stop Focusing on Numbers

You may be prepared for a lifetime of breaking down your food by numbers (calories, fat, carbs), but "that&aposs much too simplistic and is likely to take you off course. Food quality is your best bet to improve insulin sensitivity," says Weisenberger. There&aposs no need to be scared of carbs, including whole grains (Learn more about the benefits of complex carbohydrates). What&aposs more, just because something is low-carb does not make it healthy. She recommends filling your plate with berries, vegetables, oats, barley, beans and lentils, which are all sources of high-fiber carbohydrates that help reduce risk of disease.


7 Simple Ways to Reverse Prediabetes

Doable tweaks to your diet, movement and mindset that can improve insulin sensitivity.

Your doctor broke news you didn&apost want to hear: you have prediabetes, a condition where blood sugar is elevated, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. The thing is, with that info, you&aposre one of the lucky minority. Prediabetes is common, affecting 84 million American adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but just 10 percent are aware that they have it. Knowing that you have prediabetes can be enough to push you to make the changes you need, research shows.

While genes strongly influence whether someone develops prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, you have some control, says Jill Weisenberger, M.S., RDN, CDE, author of Prediabetes: A Complete Guide. "Even for those with a strong family history, lifestyle habits can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. And a delay can mean less medications for fewer years and fewer complications," she says. "The prediabetes stage is the best time to reverse course," Weisenberger adds. In fact, lifestyle changes have been shown to reduce the risk of prediabetes progressing to type 2, per a 2018 study in Primary Care Diabetes.

The goal: reduce insulin resistance and preserve beta cell function (beta cells are pancreatic cells that produce insulin). Minor weight loss-just 5 to 7 percent of your body weight-can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 58 percent, says the CDC, in part because a healthier weight generally means better insulin sensitivity. However, improving insulin sensitivity goes beyond the number on the scale. Here are seven ways to do just that.

Stop Focusing on Numbers

You may be prepared for a lifetime of breaking down your food by numbers (calories, fat, carbs), but "that&aposs much too simplistic and is likely to take you off course. Food quality is your best bet to improve insulin sensitivity," says Weisenberger. There&aposs no need to be scared of carbs, including whole grains (Learn more about the benefits of complex carbohydrates). What&aposs more, just because something is low-carb does not make it healthy. She recommends filling your plate with berries, vegetables, oats, barley, beans and lentils, which are all sources of high-fiber carbohydrates that help reduce risk of disease.


7 Simple Ways to Reverse Prediabetes

Doable tweaks to your diet, movement and mindset that can improve insulin sensitivity.

Your doctor broke news you didn&apost want to hear: you have prediabetes, a condition where blood sugar is elevated, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. The thing is, with that info, you&aposre one of the lucky minority. Prediabetes is common, affecting 84 million American adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but just 10 percent are aware that they have it. Knowing that you have prediabetes can be enough to push you to make the changes you need, research shows.

While genes strongly influence whether someone develops prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, you have some control, says Jill Weisenberger, M.S., RDN, CDE, author of Prediabetes: A Complete Guide. "Even for those with a strong family history, lifestyle habits can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. And a delay can mean less medications for fewer years and fewer complications," she says. "The prediabetes stage is the best time to reverse course," Weisenberger adds. In fact, lifestyle changes have been shown to reduce the risk of prediabetes progressing to type 2, per a 2018 study in Primary Care Diabetes.

The goal: reduce insulin resistance and preserve beta cell function (beta cells are pancreatic cells that produce insulin). Minor weight loss-just 5 to 7 percent of your body weight-can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 58 percent, says the CDC, in part because a healthier weight generally means better insulin sensitivity. However, improving insulin sensitivity goes beyond the number on the scale. Here are seven ways to do just that.

Stop Focusing on Numbers

You may be prepared for a lifetime of breaking down your food by numbers (calories, fat, carbs), but "that&aposs much too simplistic and is likely to take you off course. Food quality is your best bet to improve insulin sensitivity," says Weisenberger. There&aposs no need to be scared of carbs, including whole grains (Learn more about the benefits of complex carbohydrates). What&aposs more, just because something is low-carb does not make it healthy. She recommends filling your plate with berries, vegetables, oats, barley, beans and lentils, which are all sources of high-fiber carbohydrates that help reduce risk of disease.


7 Simple Ways to Reverse Prediabetes

Doable tweaks to your diet, movement and mindset that can improve insulin sensitivity.

Your doctor broke news you didn&apost want to hear: you have prediabetes, a condition where blood sugar is elevated, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. The thing is, with that info, you&aposre one of the lucky minority. Prediabetes is common, affecting 84 million American adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but just 10 percent are aware that they have it. Knowing that you have prediabetes can be enough to push you to make the changes you need, research shows.

While genes strongly influence whether someone develops prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, you have some control, says Jill Weisenberger, M.S., RDN, CDE, author of Prediabetes: A Complete Guide. "Even for those with a strong family history, lifestyle habits can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. And a delay can mean less medications for fewer years and fewer complications," she says. "The prediabetes stage is the best time to reverse course," Weisenberger adds. In fact, lifestyle changes have been shown to reduce the risk of prediabetes progressing to type 2, per a 2018 study in Primary Care Diabetes.

The goal: reduce insulin resistance and preserve beta cell function (beta cells are pancreatic cells that produce insulin). Minor weight loss-just 5 to 7 percent of your body weight-can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 58 percent, says the CDC, in part because a healthier weight generally means better insulin sensitivity. However, improving insulin sensitivity goes beyond the number on the scale. Here are seven ways to do just that.

Stop Focusing on Numbers

You may be prepared for a lifetime of breaking down your food by numbers (calories, fat, carbs), but "that&aposs much too simplistic and is likely to take you off course. Food quality is your best bet to improve insulin sensitivity," says Weisenberger. There&aposs no need to be scared of carbs, including whole grains (Learn more about the benefits of complex carbohydrates). What&aposs more, just because something is low-carb does not make it healthy. She recommends filling your plate with berries, vegetables, oats, barley, beans and lentils, which are all sources of high-fiber carbohydrates that help reduce risk of disease.


7 Simple Ways to Reverse Prediabetes

Doable tweaks to your diet, movement and mindset that can improve insulin sensitivity.

Your doctor broke news you didn&apost want to hear: you have prediabetes, a condition where blood sugar is elevated, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. The thing is, with that info, you&aposre one of the lucky minority. Prediabetes is common, affecting 84 million American adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but just 10 percent are aware that they have it. Knowing that you have prediabetes can be enough to push you to make the changes you need, research shows.

While genes strongly influence whether someone develops prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, you have some control, says Jill Weisenberger, M.S., RDN, CDE, author of Prediabetes: A Complete Guide. "Even for those with a strong family history, lifestyle habits can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. And a delay can mean less medications for fewer years and fewer complications," she says. "The prediabetes stage is the best time to reverse course," Weisenberger adds. In fact, lifestyle changes have been shown to reduce the risk of prediabetes progressing to type 2, per a 2018 study in Primary Care Diabetes.

The goal: reduce insulin resistance and preserve beta cell function (beta cells are pancreatic cells that produce insulin). Minor weight loss-just 5 to 7 percent of your body weight-can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 58 percent, says the CDC, in part because a healthier weight generally means better insulin sensitivity. However, improving insulin sensitivity goes beyond the number on the scale. Here are seven ways to do just that.

Stop Focusing on Numbers

You may be prepared for a lifetime of breaking down your food by numbers (calories, fat, carbs), but "that&aposs much too simplistic and is likely to take you off course. Food quality is your best bet to improve insulin sensitivity," says Weisenberger. There&aposs no need to be scared of carbs, including whole grains (Learn more about the benefits of complex carbohydrates). What&aposs more, just because something is low-carb does not make it healthy. She recommends filling your plate with berries, vegetables, oats, barley, beans and lentils, which are all sources of high-fiber carbohydrates that help reduce risk of disease.


7 Simple Ways to Reverse Prediabetes

Doable tweaks to your diet, movement and mindset that can improve insulin sensitivity.

Your doctor broke news you didn&apost want to hear: you have prediabetes, a condition where blood sugar is elevated, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. The thing is, with that info, you&aposre one of the lucky minority. Prediabetes is common, affecting 84 million American adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but just 10 percent are aware that they have it. Knowing that you have prediabetes can be enough to push you to make the changes you need, research shows.

While genes strongly influence whether someone develops prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, you have some control, says Jill Weisenberger, M.S., RDN, CDE, author of Prediabetes: A Complete Guide. "Even for those with a strong family history, lifestyle habits can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. And a delay can mean less medications for fewer years and fewer complications," she says. "The prediabetes stage is the best time to reverse course," Weisenberger adds. In fact, lifestyle changes have been shown to reduce the risk of prediabetes progressing to type 2, per a 2018 study in Primary Care Diabetes.

The goal: reduce insulin resistance and preserve beta cell function (beta cells are pancreatic cells that produce insulin). Minor weight loss-just 5 to 7 percent of your body weight-can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 58 percent, says the CDC, in part because a healthier weight generally means better insulin sensitivity. However, improving insulin sensitivity goes beyond the number on the scale. Here are seven ways to do just that.

Stop Focusing on Numbers

You may be prepared for a lifetime of breaking down your food by numbers (calories, fat, carbs), but "that&aposs much too simplistic and is likely to take you off course. Food quality is your best bet to improve insulin sensitivity," says Weisenberger. There&aposs no need to be scared of carbs, including whole grains (Learn more about the benefits of complex carbohydrates). What&aposs more, just because something is low-carb does not make it healthy. She recommends filling your plate with berries, vegetables, oats, barley, beans and lentils, which are all sources of high-fiber carbohydrates that help reduce risk of disease.


7 Simple Ways to Reverse Prediabetes

Doable tweaks to your diet, movement and mindset that can improve insulin sensitivity.

Your doctor broke news you didn&apost want to hear: you have prediabetes, a condition where blood sugar is elevated, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. The thing is, with that info, you&aposre one of the lucky minority. Prediabetes is common, affecting 84 million American adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but just 10 percent are aware that they have it. Knowing that you have prediabetes can be enough to push you to make the changes you need, research shows.

While genes strongly influence whether someone develops prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, you have some control, says Jill Weisenberger, M.S., RDN, CDE, author of Prediabetes: A Complete Guide. "Even for those with a strong family history, lifestyle habits can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. And a delay can mean less medications for fewer years and fewer complications," she says. "The prediabetes stage is the best time to reverse course," Weisenberger adds. In fact, lifestyle changes have been shown to reduce the risk of prediabetes progressing to type 2, per a 2018 study in Primary Care Diabetes.

The goal: reduce insulin resistance and preserve beta cell function (beta cells are pancreatic cells that produce insulin). Minor weight loss-just 5 to 7 percent of your body weight-can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 58 percent, says the CDC, in part because a healthier weight generally means better insulin sensitivity. However, improving insulin sensitivity goes beyond the number on the scale. Here are seven ways to do just that.

Stop Focusing on Numbers

You may be prepared for a lifetime of breaking down your food by numbers (calories, fat, carbs), but "that&aposs much too simplistic and is likely to take you off course. Food quality is your best bet to improve insulin sensitivity," says Weisenberger. There&aposs no need to be scared of carbs, including whole grains (Learn more about the benefits of complex carbohydrates). What&aposs more, just because something is low-carb does not make it healthy. She recommends filling your plate with berries, vegetables, oats, barley, beans and lentils, which are all sources of high-fiber carbohydrates that help reduce risk of disease.


7 Simple Ways to Reverse Prediabetes

Doable tweaks to your diet, movement and mindset that can improve insulin sensitivity.

Your doctor broke news you didn&apost want to hear: you have prediabetes, a condition where blood sugar is elevated, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. The thing is, with that info, you&aposre one of the lucky minority. Prediabetes is common, affecting 84 million American adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but just 10 percent are aware that they have it. Knowing that you have prediabetes can be enough to push you to make the changes you need, research shows.

While genes strongly influence whether someone develops prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, you have some control, says Jill Weisenberger, M.S., RDN, CDE, author of Prediabetes: A Complete Guide. "Even for those with a strong family history, lifestyle habits can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. And a delay can mean less medications for fewer years and fewer complications," she says. "The prediabetes stage is the best time to reverse course," Weisenberger adds. In fact, lifestyle changes have been shown to reduce the risk of prediabetes progressing to type 2, per a 2018 study in Primary Care Diabetes.

The goal: reduce insulin resistance and preserve beta cell function (beta cells are pancreatic cells that produce insulin). Minor weight loss-just 5 to 7 percent of your body weight-can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 58 percent, says the CDC, in part because a healthier weight generally means better insulin sensitivity. However, improving insulin sensitivity goes beyond the number on the scale. Here are seven ways to do just that.

Stop Focusing on Numbers

You may be prepared for a lifetime of breaking down your food by numbers (calories, fat, carbs), but "that&aposs much too simplistic and is likely to take you off course. Food quality is your best bet to improve insulin sensitivity," says Weisenberger. There&aposs no need to be scared of carbs, including whole grains (Learn more about the benefits of complex carbohydrates). What&aposs more, just because something is low-carb does not make it healthy. She recommends filling your plate with berries, vegetables, oats, barley, beans and lentils, which are all sources of high-fiber carbohydrates that help reduce risk of disease.


7 Simple Ways to Reverse Prediabetes

Doable tweaks to your diet, movement and mindset that can improve insulin sensitivity.

Your doctor broke news you didn&apost want to hear: you have prediabetes, a condition where blood sugar is elevated, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. The thing is, with that info, you&aposre one of the lucky minority. Prediabetes is common, affecting 84 million American adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but just 10 percent are aware that they have it. Knowing that you have prediabetes can be enough to push you to make the changes you need, research shows.

While genes strongly influence whether someone develops prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, you have some control, says Jill Weisenberger, M.S., RDN, CDE, author of Prediabetes: A Complete Guide. "Even for those with a strong family history, lifestyle habits can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. And a delay can mean less medications for fewer years and fewer complications," she says. "The prediabetes stage is the best time to reverse course," Weisenberger adds. In fact, lifestyle changes have been shown to reduce the risk of prediabetes progressing to type 2, per a 2018 study in Primary Care Diabetes.

The goal: reduce insulin resistance and preserve beta cell function (beta cells are pancreatic cells that produce insulin). Minor weight loss-just 5 to 7 percent of your body weight-can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 58 percent, says the CDC, in part because a healthier weight generally means better insulin sensitivity. However, improving insulin sensitivity goes beyond the number on the scale. Here are seven ways to do just that.

Stop Focusing on Numbers

You may be prepared for a lifetime of breaking down your food by numbers (calories, fat, carbs), but "that&aposs much too simplistic and is likely to take you off course. Food quality is your best bet to improve insulin sensitivity," says Weisenberger. There&aposs no need to be scared of carbs, including whole grains (Learn more about the benefits of complex carbohydrates). What&aposs more, just because something is low-carb does not make it healthy. She recommends filling your plate with berries, vegetables, oats, barley, beans and lentils, which are all sources of high-fiber carbohydrates that help reduce risk of disease.