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Lotus C-01 Futuristic Motorcycles Ready to Tear Up Asphalt

Lotus C-01 Futuristic Motorcycles Ready to Tear Up Asphalt

As a producer of some of the most unique supercars to ever hit the road, Lotus has extended licensing to Kodewa Performance Motorcycles to produce the C-01, which will be the first motorcycle in the brand's line of vehicles. Designed by Daniel Simon who has previously worked with manufacturers like Bugatti and Volkswagen (as well as for Hollywood concepts appearing in flicks like Captain America, Tron and Oblivion), the C-01 is an elegant bike that fuses the eye-catching design of futuristic movie vehicles with the power and agility of the Lotus brand.

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On the strikingly unique aesthetic of the bike, Simon said, “The design process of the C-01 was a labour of love, there were many challenges, ensuring that the bike not only touches your visual senses with its timeless blend of classic appeal and modern execution, but that is safe and ergonomically sound was critical to me."

Constructed with carbon fiber, aerospace-quality steel and titanium, the C-01 should be remarkably light and responsive on the road. The Kodewa-engineered V-twin, 2-cylinder 4-stroke engine is more than sufficient to earn the C-01 the classification of a superbike, as it apparently puts out 200hp.

Anyone interested in getting a C-01 will need to act fast the moment the superbike is released, because only 100 of them will be produced, making them instant and incredible collector's items. Dr. Colin Kolles of Kodewa noted, "Over the years I have seen my fair share of style over substance, what this bike brings to the market is a unique combination of both: state of the art technology with a truly jaw-dropping aesthetic."

In regards to Kolles' remark on aesthetics, we couldn't agree more. But, as far as substance is concerned, we'll have to withhold judgment until this marvelous machine is commercially available.


Declared a city only in 1994, Johor Bahru is a rapidly growing city. Latest census figures indicates that it is Malaysia's third largest city, with city center and metropolitan populations numbering 497,000 and 1.8 million respectively. Given its relatively large land space, the town is not as dense as other cities around Malaysia.

Due to its proximity to Singapore, it unavoidably suffers from comparison with its neighbour. Recent clean-up initiatives like greening the city and covering the open sewers that until a few years ago ran through the center of the city have made it a more pleasant place to live. However, even up to now, there has been little efforts in maintaining buildings and public facilities and even the city center may seem run-down to some. Though appreciably less organised and much more messy compared to the glitz of Singapore, shopping and eating in the city can be a real adventure, with many shopping complexes and a wide variety of food establishments offering budget to fine dining.

Johor Bahru is probably more well known as an industrial city rather than a tourist-friendly town. Many of the world's top electronics manufacturers have at least one plant in Johor Bahru, and after the tough times after the 1997 economic crisis the town is stirring to life again.

A new immigration and customs checkpoint - the Sultan Iskandar Customs, Immigration and Quarantine Complex - was opened in Dec 2008. An almost straight, 600-metre long flyover now links this gigantic complex with the Causeway.

Orientation [ edit ]

Johor Bahru's metropolitan area can be easily divided into four parts - North, South, East and West.

South - The main city centre is located on the southern part of the city which has a link to Singapore via the causeway. It is an area with housing estates which have been around for more than three decades. Important estates include Taman Pelangi, Taman Century and Taman Sentosa.

North - Its main centre is Taman Johor Jaya, and it can be accessed via the trunk road, Jalan Tebrau. There can be a relatively frequent peak hour jam along this road. Recently, the Austin area has been a hive for construction activities with the latest Jusco Tebrau City locating in its vicinity.

West - Probably one of the largest areas of the four, its hub is Skudai and important housing estates such as Taman Ungku Tun Aminah, Taman Skudai Baru, Taman Bukit Indah, Taman Perling and Taman Nusa Bestari are located here.

East - The main hubs here are Pasir Gudang which is both a port city as well as a manufacturing hub, and Masai.


Declared a city only in 1994, Johor Bahru is a rapidly growing city. Latest census figures indicates that it is Malaysia's third largest city, with city center and metropolitan populations numbering 497,000 and 1.8 million respectively. Given its relatively large land space, the town is not as dense as other cities around Malaysia.

Due to its proximity to Singapore, it unavoidably suffers from comparison with its neighbour. Recent clean-up initiatives like greening the city and covering the open sewers that until a few years ago ran through the center of the city have made it a more pleasant place to live. However, even up to now, there has been little efforts in maintaining buildings and public facilities and even the city center may seem run-down to some. Though appreciably less organised and much more messy compared to the glitz of Singapore, shopping and eating in the city can be a real adventure, with many shopping complexes and a wide variety of food establishments offering budget to fine dining.

Johor Bahru is probably more well known as an industrial city rather than a tourist-friendly town. Many of the world's top electronics manufacturers have at least one plant in Johor Bahru, and after the tough times after the 1997 economic crisis the town is stirring to life again.

A new immigration and customs checkpoint - the Sultan Iskandar Customs, Immigration and Quarantine Complex - was opened in Dec 2008. An almost straight, 600-metre long flyover now links this gigantic complex with the Causeway.

Orientation [ edit ]

Johor Bahru's metropolitan area can be easily divided into four parts - North, South, East and West.

South - The main city centre is located on the southern part of the city which has a link to Singapore via the causeway. It is an area with housing estates which have been around for more than three decades. Important estates include Taman Pelangi, Taman Century and Taman Sentosa.

North - Its main centre is Taman Johor Jaya, and it can be accessed via the trunk road, Jalan Tebrau. There can be a relatively frequent peak hour jam along this road. Recently, the Austin area has been a hive for construction activities with the latest Jusco Tebrau City locating in its vicinity.

West - Probably one of the largest areas of the four, its hub is Skudai and important housing estates such as Taman Ungku Tun Aminah, Taman Skudai Baru, Taman Bukit Indah, Taman Perling and Taman Nusa Bestari are located here.

East - The main hubs here are Pasir Gudang which is both a port city as well as a manufacturing hub, and Masai.


Declared a city only in 1994, Johor Bahru is a rapidly growing city. Latest census figures indicates that it is Malaysia's third largest city, with city center and metropolitan populations numbering 497,000 and 1.8 million respectively. Given its relatively large land space, the town is not as dense as other cities around Malaysia.

Due to its proximity to Singapore, it unavoidably suffers from comparison with its neighbour. Recent clean-up initiatives like greening the city and covering the open sewers that until a few years ago ran through the center of the city have made it a more pleasant place to live. However, even up to now, there has been little efforts in maintaining buildings and public facilities and even the city center may seem run-down to some. Though appreciably less organised and much more messy compared to the glitz of Singapore, shopping and eating in the city can be a real adventure, with many shopping complexes and a wide variety of food establishments offering budget to fine dining.

Johor Bahru is probably more well known as an industrial city rather than a tourist-friendly town. Many of the world's top electronics manufacturers have at least one plant in Johor Bahru, and after the tough times after the 1997 economic crisis the town is stirring to life again.

A new immigration and customs checkpoint - the Sultan Iskandar Customs, Immigration and Quarantine Complex - was opened in Dec 2008. An almost straight, 600-metre long flyover now links this gigantic complex with the Causeway.

Orientation [ edit ]

Johor Bahru's metropolitan area can be easily divided into four parts - North, South, East and West.

South - The main city centre is located on the southern part of the city which has a link to Singapore via the causeway. It is an area with housing estates which have been around for more than three decades. Important estates include Taman Pelangi, Taman Century and Taman Sentosa.

North - Its main centre is Taman Johor Jaya, and it can be accessed via the trunk road, Jalan Tebrau. There can be a relatively frequent peak hour jam along this road. Recently, the Austin area has been a hive for construction activities with the latest Jusco Tebrau City locating in its vicinity.

West - Probably one of the largest areas of the four, its hub is Skudai and important housing estates such as Taman Ungku Tun Aminah, Taman Skudai Baru, Taman Bukit Indah, Taman Perling and Taman Nusa Bestari are located here.

East - The main hubs here are Pasir Gudang which is both a port city as well as a manufacturing hub, and Masai.


Declared a city only in 1994, Johor Bahru is a rapidly growing city. Latest census figures indicates that it is Malaysia's third largest city, with city center and metropolitan populations numbering 497,000 and 1.8 million respectively. Given its relatively large land space, the town is not as dense as other cities around Malaysia.

Due to its proximity to Singapore, it unavoidably suffers from comparison with its neighbour. Recent clean-up initiatives like greening the city and covering the open sewers that until a few years ago ran through the center of the city have made it a more pleasant place to live. However, even up to now, there has been little efforts in maintaining buildings and public facilities and even the city center may seem run-down to some. Though appreciably less organised and much more messy compared to the glitz of Singapore, shopping and eating in the city can be a real adventure, with many shopping complexes and a wide variety of food establishments offering budget to fine dining.

Johor Bahru is probably more well known as an industrial city rather than a tourist-friendly town. Many of the world's top electronics manufacturers have at least one plant in Johor Bahru, and after the tough times after the 1997 economic crisis the town is stirring to life again.

A new immigration and customs checkpoint - the Sultan Iskandar Customs, Immigration and Quarantine Complex - was opened in Dec 2008. An almost straight, 600-metre long flyover now links this gigantic complex with the Causeway.

Orientation [ edit ]

Johor Bahru's metropolitan area can be easily divided into four parts - North, South, East and West.

South - The main city centre is located on the southern part of the city which has a link to Singapore via the causeway. It is an area with housing estates which have been around for more than three decades. Important estates include Taman Pelangi, Taman Century and Taman Sentosa.

North - Its main centre is Taman Johor Jaya, and it can be accessed via the trunk road, Jalan Tebrau. There can be a relatively frequent peak hour jam along this road. Recently, the Austin area has been a hive for construction activities with the latest Jusco Tebrau City locating in its vicinity.

West - Probably one of the largest areas of the four, its hub is Skudai and important housing estates such as Taman Ungku Tun Aminah, Taman Skudai Baru, Taman Bukit Indah, Taman Perling and Taman Nusa Bestari are located here.

East - The main hubs here are Pasir Gudang which is both a port city as well as a manufacturing hub, and Masai.


Declared a city only in 1994, Johor Bahru is a rapidly growing city. Latest census figures indicates that it is Malaysia's third largest city, with city center and metropolitan populations numbering 497,000 and 1.8 million respectively. Given its relatively large land space, the town is not as dense as other cities around Malaysia.

Due to its proximity to Singapore, it unavoidably suffers from comparison with its neighbour. Recent clean-up initiatives like greening the city and covering the open sewers that until a few years ago ran through the center of the city have made it a more pleasant place to live. However, even up to now, there has been little efforts in maintaining buildings and public facilities and even the city center may seem run-down to some. Though appreciably less organised and much more messy compared to the glitz of Singapore, shopping and eating in the city can be a real adventure, with many shopping complexes and a wide variety of food establishments offering budget to fine dining.

Johor Bahru is probably more well known as an industrial city rather than a tourist-friendly town. Many of the world's top electronics manufacturers have at least one plant in Johor Bahru, and after the tough times after the 1997 economic crisis the town is stirring to life again.

A new immigration and customs checkpoint - the Sultan Iskandar Customs, Immigration and Quarantine Complex - was opened in Dec 2008. An almost straight, 600-metre long flyover now links this gigantic complex with the Causeway.

Orientation [ edit ]

Johor Bahru's metropolitan area can be easily divided into four parts - North, South, East and West.

South - The main city centre is located on the southern part of the city which has a link to Singapore via the causeway. It is an area with housing estates which have been around for more than three decades. Important estates include Taman Pelangi, Taman Century and Taman Sentosa.

North - Its main centre is Taman Johor Jaya, and it can be accessed via the trunk road, Jalan Tebrau. There can be a relatively frequent peak hour jam along this road. Recently, the Austin area has been a hive for construction activities with the latest Jusco Tebrau City locating in its vicinity.

West - Probably one of the largest areas of the four, its hub is Skudai and important housing estates such as Taman Ungku Tun Aminah, Taman Skudai Baru, Taman Bukit Indah, Taman Perling and Taman Nusa Bestari are located here.

East - The main hubs here are Pasir Gudang which is both a port city as well as a manufacturing hub, and Masai.


Declared a city only in 1994, Johor Bahru is a rapidly growing city. Latest census figures indicates that it is Malaysia's third largest city, with city center and metropolitan populations numbering 497,000 and 1.8 million respectively. Given its relatively large land space, the town is not as dense as other cities around Malaysia.

Due to its proximity to Singapore, it unavoidably suffers from comparison with its neighbour. Recent clean-up initiatives like greening the city and covering the open sewers that until a few years ago ran through the center of the city have made it a more pleasant place to live. However, even up to now, there has been little efforts in maintaining buildings and public facilities and even the city center may seem run-down to some. Though appreciably less organised and much more messy compared to the glitz of Singapore, shopping and eating in the city can be a real adventure, with many shopping complexes and a wide variety of food establishments offering budget to fine dining.

Johor Bahru is probably more well known as an industrial city rather than a tourist-friendly town. Many of the world's top electronics manufacturers have at least one plant in Johor Bahru, and after the tough times after the 1997 economic crisis the town is stirring to life again.

A new immigration and customs checkpoint - the Sultan Iskandar Customs, Immigration and Quarantine Complex - was opened in Dec 2008. An almost straight, 600-metre long flyover now links this gigantic complex with the Causeway.

Orientation [ edit ]

Johor Bahru's metropolitan area can be easily divided into four parts - North, South, East and West.

South - The main city centre is located on the southern part of the city which has a link to Singapore via the causeway. It is an area with housing estates which have been around for more than three decades. Important estates include Taman Pelangi, Taman Century and Taman Sentosa.

North - Its main centre is Taman Johor Jaya, and it can be accessed via the trunk road, Jalan Tebrau. There can be a relatively frequent peak hour jam along this road. Recently, the Austin area has been a hive for construction activities with the latest Jusco Tebrau City locating in its vicinity.

West - Probably one of the largest areas of the four, its hub is Skudai and important housing estates such as Taman Ungku Tun Aminah, Taman Skudai Baru, Taman Bukit Indah, Taman Perling and Taman Nusa Bestari are located here.

East - The main hubs here are Pasir Gudang which is both a port city as well as a manufacturing hub, and Masai.


Declared a city only in 1994, Johor Bahru is a rapidly growing city. Latest census figures indicates that it is Malaysia's third largest city, with city center and metropolitan populations numbering 497,000 and 1.8 million respectively. Given its relatively large land space, the town is not as dense as other cities around Malaysia.

Due to its proximity to Singapore, it unavoidably suffers from comparison with its neighbour. Recent clean-up initiatives like greening the city and covering the open sewers that until a few years ago ran through the center of the city have made it a more pleasant place to live. However, even up to now, there has been little efforts in maintaining buildings and public facilities and even the city center may seem run-down to some. Though appreciably less organised and much more messy compared to the glitz of Singapore, shopping and eating in the city can be a real adventure, with many shopping complexes and a wide variety of food establishments offering budget to fine dining.

Johor Bahru is probably more well known as an industrial city rather than a tourist-friendly town. Many of the world's top electronics manufacturers have at least one plant in Johor Bahru, and after the tough times after the 1997 economic crisis the town is stirring to life again.

A new immigration and customs checkpoint - the Sultan Iskandar Customs, Immigration and Quarantine Complex - was opened in Dec 2008. An almost straight, 600-metre long flyover now links this gigantic complex with the Causeway.

Orientation [ edit ]

Johor Bahru's metropolitan area can be easily divided into four parts - North, South, East and West.

South - The main city centre is located on the southern part of the city which has a link to Singapore via the causeway. It is an area with housing estates which have been around for more than three decades. Important estates include Taman Pelangi, Taman Century and Taman Sentosa.

North - Its main centre is Taman Johor Jaya, and it can be accessed via the trunk road, Jalan Tebrau. There can be a relatively frequent peak hour jam along this road. Recently, the Austin area has been a hive for construction activities with the latest Jusco Tebrau City locating in its vicinity.

West - Probably one of the largest areas of the four, its hub is Skudai and important housing estates such as Taman Ungku Tun Aminah, Taman Skudai Baru, Taman Bukit Indah, Taman Perling and Taman Nusa Bestari are located here.

East - The main hubs here are Pasir Gudang which is both a port city as well as a manufacturing hub, and Masai.


Declared a city only in 1994, Johor Bahru is a rapidly growing city. Latest census figures indicates that it is Malaysia's third largest city, with city center and metropolitan populations numbering 497,000 and 1.8 million respectively. Given its relatively large land space, the town is not as dense as other cities around Malaysia.

Due to its proximity to Singapore, it unavoidably suffers from comparison with its neighbour. Recent clean-up initiatives like greening the city and covering the open sewers that until a few years ago ran through the center of the city have made it a more pleasant place to live. However, even up to now, there has been little efforts in maintaining buildings and public facilities and even the city center may seem run-down to some. Though appreciably less organised and much more messy compared to the glitz of Singapore, shopping and eating in the city can be a real adventure, with many shopping complexes and a wide variety of food establishments offering budget to fine dining.

Johor Bahru is probably more well known as an industrial city rather than a tourist-friendly town. Many of the world's top electronics manufacturers have at least one plant in Johor Bahru, and after the tough times after the 1997 economic crisis the town is stirring to life again.

A new immigration and customs checkpoint - the Sultan Iskandar Customs, Immigration and Quarantine Complex - was opened in Dec 2008. An almost straight, 600-metre long flyover now links this gigantic complex with the Causeway.

Orientation [ edit ]

Johor Bahru's metropolitan area can be easily divided into four parts - North, South, East and West.

South - The main city centre is located on the southern part of the city which has a link to Singapore via the causeway. It is an area with housing estates which have been around for more than three decades. Important estates include Taman Pelangi, Taman Century and Taman Sentosa.

North - Its main centre is Taman Johor Jaya, and it can be accessed via the trunk road, Jalan Tebrau. There can be a relatively frequent peak hour jam along this road. Recently, the Austin area has been a hive for construction activities with the latest Jusco Tebrau City locating in its vicinity.

West - Probably one of the largest areas of the four, its hub is Skudai and important housing estates such as Taman Ungku Tun Aminah, Taman Skudai Baru, Taman Bukit Indah, Taman Perling and Taman Nusa Bestari are located here.

East - The main hubs here are Pasir Gudang which is both a port city as well as a manufacturing hub, and Masai.


Declared a city only in 1994, Johor Bahru is a rapidly growing city. Latest census figures indicates that it is Malaysia's third largest city, with city center and metropolitan populations numbering 497,000 and 1.8 million respectively. Given its relatively large land space, the town is not as dense as other cities around Malaysia.

Due to its proximity to Singapore, it unavoidably suffers from comparison with its neighbour. Recent clean-up initiatives like greening the city and covering the open sewers that until a few years ago ran through the center of the city have made it a more pleasant place to live. However, even up to now, there has been little efforts in maintaining buildings and public facilities and even the city center may seem run-down to some. Though appreciably less organised and much more messy compared to the glitz of Singapore, shopping and eating in the city can be a real adventure, with many shopping complexes and a wide variety of food establishments offering budget to fine dining.

Johor Bahru is probably more well known as an industrial city rather than a tourist-friendly town. Many of the world's top electronics manufacturers have at least one plant in Johor Bahru, and after the tough times after the 1997 economic crisis the town is stirring to life again.

A new immigration and customs checkpoint - the Sultan Iskandar Customs, Immigration and Quarantine Complex - was opened in Dec 2008. An almost straight, 600-metre long flyover now links this gigantic complex with the Causeway.

Orientation [ edit ]

Johor Bahru's metropolitan area can be easily divided into four parts - North, South, East and West.

South - The main city centre is located on the southern part of the city which has a link to Singapore via the causeway. It is an area with housing estates which have been around for more than three decades. Important estates include Taman Pelangi, Taman Century and Taman Sentosa.

North - Its main centre is Taman Johor Jaya, and it can be accessed via the trunk road, Jalan Tebrau. There can be a relatively frequent peak hour jam along this road. Recently, the Austin area has been a hive for construction activities with the latest Jusco Tebrau City locating in its vicinity.

West - Probably one of the largest areas of the four, its hub is Skudai and important housing estates such as Taman Ungku Tun Aminah, Taman Skudai Baru, Taman Bukit Indah, Taman Perling and Taman Nusa Bestari are located here.

East - The main hubs here are Pasir Gudang which is both a port city as well as a manufacturing hub, and Masai.


Declared a city only in 1994, Johor Bahru is a rapidly growing city. Latest census figures indicates that it is Malaysia's third largest city, with city center and metropolitan populations numbering 497,000 and 1.8 million respectively. Given its relatively large land space, the town is not as dense as other cities around Malaysia.

Due to its proximity to Singapore, it unavoidably suffers from comparison with its neighbour. Recent clean-up initiatives like greening the city and covering the open sewers that until a few years ago ran through the center of the city have made it a more pleasant place to live. However, even up to now, there has been little efforts in maintaining buildings and public facilities and even the city center may seem run-down to some. Though appreciably less organised and much more messy compared to the glitz of Singapore, shopping and eating in the city can be a real adventure, with many shopping complexes and a wide variety of food establishments offering budget to fine dining.

Johor Bahru is probably more well known as an industrial city rather than a tourist-friendly town. Many of the world's top electronics manufacturers have at least one plant in Johor Bahru, and after the tough times after the 1997 economic crisis the town is stirring to life again.

A new immigration and customs checkpoint - the Sultan Iskandar Customs, Immigration and Quarantine Complex - was opened in Dec 2008. An almost straight, 600-metre long flyover now links this gigantic complex with the Causeway.

Orientation [ edit ]

Johor Bahru's metropolitan area can be easily divided into four parts - North, South, East and West.

South - The main city centre is located on the southern part of the city which has a link to Singapore via the causeway. It is an area with housing estates which have been around for more than three decades. Important estates include Taman Pelangi, Taman Century and Taman Sentosa.

North - Its main centre is Taman Johor Jaya, and it can be accessed via the trunk road, Jalan Tebrau. There can be a relatively frequent peak hour jam along this road. Recently, the Austin area has been a hive for construction activities with the latest Jusco Tebrau City locating in its vicinity.

West - Probably one of the largest areas of the four, its hub is Skudai and important housing estates such as Taman Ungku Tun Aminah, Taman Skudai Baru, Taman Bukit Indah, Taman Perling and Taman Nusa Bestari are located here.

East - The main hubs here are Pasir Gudang which is both a port city as well as a manufacturing hub, and Masai.


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